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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Crisis and Decline ▸ Maximinus IView Options:  |  |  | 

Maximinus I Thrax, 20 March 235 - late May 238 A.D.

Maximinus I was a giant of a man, and possessed of natural fighting ability. He rose through the ranks of the Roman army during the reign of Severus Alexander. After a successful governorship in Mesopotamia, he was sent to the Rhine frontier to oversee the regions army recruitment levies. In 235 A.D. he was proclaimed emperor by troops offended by Severus Alexander's peace loving character, and the galling fact that his mother, Julia Mamaea, was the true power in the empire. Maximinus campaigned with great success against the Germanic tribes, but his great cruelty towards the nobility whom he hated, and general ruthlessness inspired several rebellions, notably the failed Gordian rebellion and then the rebellion of Balbinus and Pupienus. Maximinus marched against the latter two, and during the abortive siege of Aquileia his troops deserted and murdered him.


Maximinus I Thrax, 20 March 235 - Late May 238 A.D., Pella, Macedonia

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Pella was founded in 399 B.C. by King Archelaus (413 - 399 B.C.) as his capital. It was the seat of Philip II and of his son, Alexander the Great. In 168 B.C., it was sacked by the Romans, and its treasury transported to Rome. Later the city was destroyed by an earthquake. By 180 A.D., Lucian could describe it in passing as "now insignificant, with very few inhabitants."
RP83513. Bronze AE 26, SNG ANS 636, Varbanov III 3742 (R4) var. (bust also draped), AMNG III / 2 p. 99, 34 var. (same); SNG Hunterian 658 var. (same); BMC Macedonia -, aVF, excellent portrait, areas not fully struck, holed, slightly off center on a tight flan, centration dimple on reverse, weight 8.921 g, maximum diameter 26.0 mm, die axis 90o, Pella mint, 20 Mar 235 - late May 238 A.D.; obverse IMP C C IVL VER MAXIMINVS, laureate and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse COL IVL AVG PELLA, Spes seated left, putting her right hand to her mouth; $135.00 (120.15)


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In 236, Pope Fabian succeeded Pope Anterus as the twentieth pope; he separated Rome into seven deaconships, and sent seven missionaries to Gaul to evangelize in the large cities.
RS77094. Silver denarius, RIC IV 19, RSC III 37, BMCRE VI 146, Hunter III 18, cf. SRCV III 8310 (obverse legend), EF, well centered, excellent portrait, edge cracks, die wear, weight 3.255 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, late 236 - Apr 238 A.D.; obverse MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse PAX AVGVSTI (to the peace of the emperor), Pax standing half left, branch in right hand, transverse scepter in left; $120.00 (106.80)


Maximinus I Thrax, 20 March 235 - Late May 238 A.D., Thessalonica, Macedonia

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The god Kabeiros is similar in appearance to Dionysos and the rites of his cult were likely similar to those of the Dionysian mysteries. The attributes of Kabeiros are a rhyton and hammer.
RP83454. Bronze AE 24, SNG ANS 875 corr. (obv. leg.); Varbanov 4500 (R4) var. (obv. leg.); BMC Macedonia p. 123, 112 var. (same), VF, fantastic portrait, centered on a tight flan, flatly struck centers, light marks, centration dimple on reverse, weight 12.268 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 0o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, 20 Mar 235 - late May 238 A.D.; obverse AVT K Γ IOVΛ OVHP MAΞIMINOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse ΘECCAΛONIKEΩN, Nike flying left, she hold Kabeiros standing left holding rhyton and hammer in her right hand, palm frond in her left hand; scarce obv. legend variety; $120.00 (106.80)







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OBVERSE LEGENDS

IMPMAXIMINVSPIVSAVG
MAXIMINVSPIVSAVGGERM


REFERENCES

Alram, A. Die Mnzprgung der Kaiser Maximinus I Thrax (235 / 238). (Wien, 1989).
Banti, A. and L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 4: Septimius Severus to Maximinus Thrax. (Paris, 1884).
Mattingly, H., E.A. Sydenham & C.H.V. Sutherland. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol IV, From Pertinax to Uranius Antoninus. (London, 1986).
Mattingly, H. & R.A.G. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 6: Severus Alexander to Pupienus. (London, 1963).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. III. Pertinax to Aemilian. (Oxford, 1977).
Seaby, H.A. & D.R. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Volume III, Pertinax to Balbinus and Pupienus. (London, 1982).
Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values III, The Accession of Maximinus I to the Death of Carinus AD 235 - AD 285. (London, 2005).
Vagi, David. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Sunday, September 24, 2017.
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Roman Coins of Maximinus I