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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Personifications ▸ MoneyView Options:  |  |  | 

Money (Moneta)

Coins about...money! One of our favorite collecting themes. Roman propaganda often recorded largesses (represented by Liberalitas) on coins. She is usually depicted holding what was traditionally described as an abacus, a counting board. The object is also described as a tessera, type of banner, showing a number of painted marks equal to the number of aurei or denarii offered. Curtis Clay suggested it is actually a money shovel, a wooden shovel with shallow round depressions which could extract the exact number of coins needed from a chest. Another popular type is that of Moneta holding scales. One quite interesting coin is the Republic denarius of T.Carisius depicting mint tools: an anvil, tongs, a hammer and a die.


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D..

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Overstruck over a denarius of Severus Alexander, which suggests that the new coin was worth at least as much of the old one. Otherwise, it would have made more sense to melt the denarius.
RA73221. Silver antoninianus, cf. RIC V 287 (S), Webb Carausius 336, SRCV IV 13629, VF, toned, weight 2.664 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 225o, Camulodunum (Colchester, England) mint, c. 290 - 291 A.D.; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse MONETA AVG, Moneta standing left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, mintmark obscured by over-strike effects; undertype bust (Severus Alexander?) visible; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection, ex Forum (2010); scarce; $130.00 (110.50)


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D., Magnesia ad Sipylum, Lydia

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Magnesia ad Sipylum was a city of Lydia, situated about 65 km northeast of Smyrna (now Izmir) on the river Hermus (now Gediz) at the foot of Spil Mount. Nowadays this is the location of Manisa in Turkey. It became a city of importance under the Roman dominion and, though nearly destroyed by an earthquake in the reign of Tiberius, was restored by that emperor and flourished through the Roman Empire.

Ploutos the personification of wealth is the son of Eirene, goddess of peace.
GB85348. Bronze AE 15, RPC Online VI 1330 (13 spec.); BMC Lydia p. 147, 59; SNG Cop 262; SNG Mun 268; SNG Leypold 1040; Waddington 5082; Mionnet IV 406; SNGvA -; SNG Tub -, VF, porous, die break obverse lower left, weight 2.788 g, maximum diameter 15.1 mm, die axis 180o, Magnesia ad Sipylum (Manisa, Turkey) mint, as caesar, c. 140 A.D.; obverse KAI AYPHΛIOC, bare-headed, draped bust right, slight beard; reverse MAΓNHTΩN XIΠYΛOY, child (Ploutos) standing left, clad in short chiton, which he raises in front above his waist with both hands, he carries fruit in its folds; $120.00 (102.00)


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

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Liberality is personified by the image of a woman, holding in one hand a counting board, or square tablet with a handle on which are cut a certain number of holes. These boards were used to quickly count the proper number of coins or other items for distribution to each person. It appears they were held over a container, covered with coins and the excess swept away back into the container. The proper number of coins would fill the holes and then would be dumped out to the recipient. On coins this symbol indicated the prince had given to the people money, grain, or other articles of consumption. In the other hand she holds a cornucopia, to indicate the abundance of wheat contained in the public graineries.
RS72573. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 38b, RSC IV 87, Hunter III 21, SRCV III 8937, VF, well centered, rose gold toning, weight 4.364 g, maximum diameter 21.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 245 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse LIBERALITAS AVGG II, Liberalitas standing left, counting board in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; $100.00 (85.00)


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D.

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Liberalitas coin types attest to occasions when the emperor has displayed his generosity towards the people by a distribution to them, in money, provisions, or both. The first mention of Liberalitas was on coins of Hadrian. It was a type frequently repeated by the succeeding emperors. Indeed these instances of imperial generosity are more carefully recorded on coins than they are by history. This coin advertises that Elagabalus has made his third distribution to the people. Liberality is personified by the image of a woman, holding in one hand a counting board, or square tablet with a handle on which are cut a certain number of holes. These boards were used to quickly count the proper number of coins or other items for distribution to each person. In the other hand she holds a cornucopia
RS74122. Silver denarius, RIC IV 103; RSC III 86; Hunter III 60; SRCV II 7522; BMCRE V p. 563, 216 var. (star right), VF, well centered on a tight flan, coppery spots, reverse legend weak, weight 3.032 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 221 A.D.; obverse IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse LIBERALITAS AVG III, Liberalitas standing left, counting board in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, star lower left; $70.00 (59.50)


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D.

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This type has the earliest depiction of the Three Monetae on coinage.
RB63622. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 500, Fair, weight 19.208 g, maximum diameter 30.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 187 A.D.; obverse M COMMODVS ANT P FELIX AVG BRIT, laureate head right; reverse P M TR P XII IMP VIII COS V P P (high priest, holder of Tribunitian power for 12 years, imperator the 8th time, consul the 5th time, father of the country), three Monetae standing left, each holding scale in right and cornucopia in left, MON AVG over S C in exergue; $45.00 (38.25)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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Three Monetae are depicted, one for each metal: gold, silver and copper.
RB65851. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 670, SRCV II 6404, Fine/Fair, flan crack, weight 19.409 g, maximum diameter 30.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 194 A.D.; obverse L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP III, laureate head right; reverse MONET AVG COS II P P S C, three Monetae standing facing, each with head left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left; big 30mm brass; scarce; $32.00 (27.20)







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Catalog current as of Sunday, November 19, 2017.
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