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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Classical Fine ArtView Options:  |  |  |   

Classical Numismatic Fine Art

A collector of these pieces can have in the drawers of his cabinet, within reach of his hand as he sits by the fire, original pictures of Greek life, created by Greek artists, struck by Greek hands over two thousand years ago. There they lie before him, the same as they were then, after all these centuries of intervening history. They are as modern, many of them, as thought they had been struck today. They lie, genuine, unaltered examples of the most splendid art the world has known. -- Godfrey Locker Lampson, 1923


Syracuse, Sicily, Hieron II, 275 - 215 B.C., Portrait of Queen Philistis

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Hieron II placed his wife and son on coins during his long reign. Those of Queen Philistis are eagerly sought after by collectors.
SH84601. Silver 5 litrae, CCO Syracuse 221 (D2/R2), SNG ANS 893, SNG Lloyd 1546, SNG Cop 827, Dewing 959, McClean 2918, Weber 1708, HGC 2 1557 (R2) (all from the same dies), Choice aEF/gVF, toned, light marks, weight 4.441 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 180o, Syracuse mint, c. 218 - 215 B.C.; obverse veiled and diademed head of Queen Philistis left, palm frond behind; reverse Nike galloping biga left, holding reins with both hands, E in front of horses' legs, BAΣIΛIΣΣAΣ above, ΦIΛIΣTI∆OΣ in exergue; from the Lawrence Woolslayer Collection; Numismatica Ars Classica auction 27 (12 May 2004), lot 129; ex A.D.M. Collection; ex Ratto Collection, 1929 sale, lot 213; rare; $3000.00 (2670.00)


Athens, Greece, Old Style Tetradrachm, c. 454 - 404 B.C.

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The old-style tetradrachm of Athens is famous for its almond shaped eye, archaic smile and charming owl reverse. Around 480 B.C. a wreath of olive leaves and a decorative scroll were added to Athena's helmet. On the reverse a crescent moon was added.

During the period 449 - 413 B.C. huge quantities of tetradrachms were minted to finance grandiose building projects such as the Parthenon and to cover the costs of the Peloponnesian War.
SH84628. Silver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31, SNG Mnchen 49, Kroll 8, Dewing 1611, Gulbenkian 519, HGC 4 1597, Dewing 1611, SGCV I 2526, gVF, toned, light marks, weight 16.505 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 90o, Athens mint, c. 454 - 404 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse AΘE right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 47, lot 104; $1200.00 (1068.00)


Lokri Opuntii, Lokris, Greece, 360 - 340 B.C.

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Locrian Ajax (the Lesser) was a Greek mythological hero, son of Oileus, the king of Locris. He was the leader of the Lokrian contingent during the Trojan War. He was called the "lesser" or "Locrian" Ajax, to distinguish him from Ajax the Great, son of Telamon. He is a significant figure in Homer's Iliad and is also mentioned in the Odyssey and Virgil's Aeneid.
SH84346. Silver stater, BCD Lokris 58, Gulbenkian 491, HGC 4 992 var. (no star), BMC Central -, SNG Cop -, SNG UK -, aVF/F, superb classical style, high relief obverse die, well centered, light marks, light porosity, weight 11.715 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 180o, Lokri Opuntii mint, 360 - 340 B.C.; obverse head of Demeter left, wreathed in grain, wearing drop earring; reverse OΠONTIΩ−N, Ajax son of Oileus, advancing right in fighting attitude, wearing Corinthian helmet, nude, short sword in right, broken spear on ground in background, palmette above griffin right (control symbols) inside shield, eight-rayed star (control symbol) lower right; ex Pegasi Numismatics; $1170.00 (1041.30)


Neapolis, Campania, Italy, 320 - 300 B.C.

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Naples is one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world. Bronze Age Greek settlements were established in the second millennium B.C. The city was refounded as Neapolis in the sixth century B.C. and became an important hub of Magna Graecia, playing a key role in the merging of Greek culture into Roman society. Naples remained influential under Rome and more so after the fall of the Western Roman Empire, serving as the capital city of the Kingdom of Naples between 1282 and 1816. Thereafter, it became the capital of the Two Sicilies until the unification of Italy in 1861.
SH79832. Silver didrachm, Historia Numorum pl. 10, 571 (same dies); Sambon 438; SNG ANS 318; BMC Italy p. 98, 47; SNG Cop -, VF, beautiful style, well centered on a tight flan, uneven toning, weight 7.362 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 0o, Neapolis (Naples, Italy) mint, 320 - 300 B.C.; obverse diademed head of nymph Parthenope right, wearing large pendant earring and pearl necklace, bunch of grapes (control symbol) behind neck, ∆IOΦANOYΣ (master engraver or magistrate name) below neck truncation (off flan); reverse man-faced bull standing right, head turned facing, Nike above flying right and placing wreath on bull's head, Π∆ monogram below, NEOΠOΛITΩN in exergue (off flan); $750.00 (667.50)


Neapolis, Campania, Italy, 320 - 300 B.C.

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Naples is one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world. Bronze Age Greek settlements were established in the second millennium B.C. The city was refounded as Neapolis in the sixth century B.C. and became an important hub of Magna Graecia, playing a key role in the merging of Greek culture into Roman society. Naples remained influential under Rome and more so after the fall of the Western Roman Empire, serving as the capital city of the Kingdom of Naples between 1282 and 1816. Thereafter, it became the capital of the Two Sicilies until the unification of Italy in 1861.
SH79834. Silver nomos, SNG ANS 325; Sambon 450; BMC Italy p. 99, 53; Head HN 571; SNG Cop -; SNG Mnchen -, VF, finest style, well centered and struck on a tight flan, toned, scratches and bumps, small edge splits, weight 7.252 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Neapolis (Naples, Italy) mint, magistrate Olympios, 320 - 300 B.C.; obverse diademed head of nymph right, wearing pendant earring and pearl necklace, no legends or symbols; reverse man-faced bull standing right, head turned facing, Nike above flying right and placing wreath on bull's head, OΛ−YM−ΠI below, NEOΠOΛITHΣ in exergue; ex Fritz Rudolf Knker GmbH & Co. KG, auction 216 (8 Oct 2012), lot 48; rare; $750.00 (667.50)


Kamarina, Sicily, c. 420 - 405 B.C.

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A Gorgoneion was a horror-creating apotropaic Gorgon head pendant. The name derives from the Greek word gorgs, which means "dreadful." The Gorgons were three sisters who had hair of living, venomous snakes, and a horrifying face that turned those who saw it to stone. Stheno and Euryale were immortal, but their sister Medusa was not, and was slain by Perseus. Zeus, Athena, Hellenistic kings and Roman emperors wore Gorgoneion for protection. Images of the Gorgons were also put upon objects and buildings for protection. A Gorgon image is at the center of the pediment of the temple at Corfu, the oldest stone pediment in Greece from about 600 B.C.
GI76363. Bronze tetras, Westermark-Jenkins, type E, 193.3; Calciati III p. 55, 19; SNG ANS 1224; SNG Cop 167; HGC 2 546, EF, well centered, nice green patina, a few light marks, nose a little flat, weight 3.341 g, maximum diameter 14.2 mm, die axis 135o, Kamarina (near Scoglitti, Sicily, Italy) mint, c. 420 - 405 B.C.; obverse facing head of Medusa (gorgoneion), radiating locks, no hair band, fierce expression, knitted eyebrows, chubby cheeks; reverse KAMA (upward on left), owl standing right, head facing, holds lizard with head downward in claw, three pellets (value mark) in exergue; $700.00 (623.00)


Kingdom of Bithynia, Prusias II Kynegos, 185 - 149 B.C.

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Prusias II, son of Prusias I, inherited his father's name but not his character. He first joined with Eumenes of Pergamon in war against Pontus, but later turned on Pergamon and invaded. He was defeated and Pergamon demanded heavy reparations. Prusias sent his son Nicomedes II to Rome to ask for aid in reducing the payments. When Nicomedes revolted, Prusias II was murdered in the temple of Zeus at Nikomedia.
SH71000. Bronze AE 22, SNG Cop 640; BMC Pontus p. 210, 8; Rec Gn I.2 p. 225, 26; SNGvA 256 var. (monogram); HGC 7 629; SGCV II 7266, Choice VF, nice style, weight 6.393 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 0o, Nikomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, c. 180 - 150 B.C.; obverse head of young Dionysos right, wreathed with ivy; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΠPOYΣIOY, centaur Chiron standing right, playing lyre, his cloak flying behind, NΦ monogram inner right under raised foreleg; $640.00 (569.60)


Syracuse, Sicily, Dionysius I, 405 - 367 B.C.

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The model for the head on the obverse is derived from the facing Arethusa by Kimon. This issue is usually attributed to Exakestidas with rare examples signed E or EΞ. Stylistic differences suggest other engravers also worked the issue. This example, signed EE, is of the very finest style and clearly the work of Exakestidas. EΞ was probably intended. No other examples of the type signed EE are known to Forum.
SH83659. Bronze tetras, cf. Calciati II p. 59 ff., 29 (unlisted dies); SNG ANS 385; SNG Cop 679; SNG Mn 1107; HGC 2 1432 (R1, 415-405 B.C.); SNG Tbingen -; SNG Morcom -, aEF, the finest style, nice green patina, light corrosion, edge flaws, weight 2.23 g, maximum diameter 14.7 mm, die axis 90o, Syracuse mint, c. 400 B.C.; obverse head of nymph Arethusa facing slightly left, wearing taenia, earring, and necklace, anepigraphic, EE (master engraver signature, blundered EΞ for Exakestidas) lower left below hair; reverse octopus; ex Savoca Numismatik GmbH & Co. KG, auction 6 (9 Apr 2015), lot 68; $630.00 (560.70)


Taras, Calabria, Italy, c. 272 - 240 B.C.

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Taras, the only Spartan colony, was founded in 706 B.C. The founders were Partheniae ("sons of virgins"), sons of unmarried Spartan women and Perioeci (free men, but not citizens of Sparta). These out-of-wedlock unions were permitted to increase the prospective number of soldiers (only the citizens could be soldiers) during the bloody Messenian wars. Later, however, when they were no longer needed, their citizenship was retroactively nullified and the sons were obliged to leave Greece forever. Their leader, Phalanthus, consulted the oracle at Delphi and was told to make the harbor of Taranto their home. They named the city Taras after the son of Poseidon, and of a local nymph, Satyrion. The reverse depicts Taras being saved from a shipwreck by a dolphin sent to him by Poseidon. This symbol of the ancient Greek city is still the symbol of modern Taranto today.
SH75331. Silver nomos, SNG Cop 927, Vlasto 890, HN Italy 1037, gVF, fine style, well centered on a tight flan, toned, some marks, scratches, and light corrosion, weight 6.332 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, Taras (Taranto, Italy) mint, c. 272 - 240 BC; obverse |−HPAK/ΛHTOΣ below, helmeted and cuirassed warrior on horseback right, shield on his back, transverse spear downward in right hand; reverse TAPAΣ, Phalanthos on dolphin left, flower in extended right, cornucopia in left hand, EΓ monogram and thymiaterion (incense burner) behind; $600.00 (534.00)


Thebes, Boiotia, c. 363 - 338 B.C.

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The largest city in Boeotia, leader of the Boeotian confederacy, and rival of Athens, Thebes sided with Persia during Xerxes' invasion in 480 B.C. Thebes ended Sparta's power of at the Battle of Leuctra in 371. The Sacred Band of Thebes famously fell to Philip II at Chaeronea in 338. After a revolt in 335, Alexander the Great destroyed the city, except, according to tradition, the house of the poet Pindar.
GS84245. Silver stater, BCD Boiotia 556; Hepworth 90; SNG Cop 325; Head Boeotia p. 66; BMC Central p. 84, 164, VF, toned, light bumps and marks, obverse a little off center, small obverse die cracks, weight 12.358 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, Thebes mint, magistrate Timo..., c. 363 - 338 B.C.; obverse Boeotian ox-hide shield; reverse ornate amphora, TI-MO divide across field below center, all within a round concave incuse; ex Jencek Historical Enterprise; $550.00 (489.50)




  



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While most of the coins on this page will be from the Classical Period, 480 - 323 B.C., some later Hellenistic coins with superb portraits may also be included


Catalog current as of Thursday, January 19, 2017.
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Classical Numismatic Fine Art