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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Gods, Non-Olympian ▸ KoreView Options:  |  |  | 

Persephone (Kore)

Persephone, also called Kore, is the daughter of Zeus and the harvest goddess Demeter, and queen of the underworld; she was abducted by Hades, the king of the underworld.


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D., Hierapolis, Phrygia in Homonoia with Sardis

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This coin commemorates the homonoia (alliance) between Phrygia and Sardis. Cities in Thrace and Asia minor sometimes formed alliances with other cities. The competition for prestige and rivalry between cities in the East was intense. Alliances could enhance a city’s status by aligning either with many cities or with particularly important ones. Homonoia was part of civic "foreign policy" and might have involved the exchange of delegates and joint celebrations and sacrifices. At least 87 cities issued homonoia coins celebrating their alliances.
RP77248. Bronze AE 28, Franke-Nolle, type VI, 857 (Vs.C/Rs.18); cf. SNGvA 3668; SNG Tübingen 4054; Lindgren III 596, VF, tight flan, obscure countermark on obverse, weight 9.924 g, maximum diameter 28.1 mm, die axis 180o, Phrygia, Hierapolis (near Pamukkale, Turkey) mint, Oct 253 - c. Jun 260 A.D.; obverse AY• K• - ΠOY• ΛIK• OYAΛEPAN/OC, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front, round countermark on face; reverse IEPAΠOΛE/ITΩN - KE - CAP∆IANΩN, Apollo on left, standing right, plectrum in right hand, kithara in left hand; cult statue of Kore facing, wearing kalathos and veil, NEOKOPΩN downward in right field, OMONOYA in exergue; very rare; $200.00 (€170.00)
 


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Nysa, Lydia

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Diomedianos, named in the reverse legend, was a priest, probably of Pluto and Kore, and a magistrate, probably a grammateus. The celebrated Plutonion, a temple of Pluto and Kore, and the cave Charonion, were located on the territory of Nysa at Acharaka. Kore (Persephone) was innocently picking flowers when Pluto (Hades), god of the Underworld, burst through a cleft in the earth and abducted her. While Ceres (Demeter) searched desperately for her daughter she neglected the earth and caused nothing to grow. Jupiter (Zeus), pressed by the cries of hungry people, determined to force Pluto to return Kore. However, Pluto had tricked Kore into eating pomegranate seeds, and because anyone who consumed food or drink in the Underworld was doomed to spend eternity there, she is forced return to the underworld for a period each year. Explaining the seasons - when Ceres and her daughter are reunited, the Earth flourishes with vegetation and color, but for the months each year when Kore returns to the underworld, the earth becomes barren.
RP86875. Bronze AE 19, RPC I 2668 (4 spec.), Regling Nysa 60, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, BMC Lydia -, aF, dark patina, types clear but legends off flan/obscure, weight 6.166 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 0o, Lydia, Nysa (near Sultanhisar, Turkey) mint, magistrate/priest Diomedianos, Oct 54 - Jun 68; obverse NEPΩN KAIΣAP, bare head right; reverse NYΣAEΩN ∆IOMH∆IANOΣ, Pluto (Hades) standing in galloping quadriga right, abducting Kore (Persephone) held in his right arm; extremely rare - missing from most major collections, Coin Archives records only one example sold at auction in the last two decades; $180.00 (€153.00)
 


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Claudiconium (Iconium), Lycaonia

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After Alexander's empire broke up, Iconium was ruled by Seleucus I Nicator and later the kings of Pergamon. Attalus III, the last king of Pergamon, bequeathed his kingdom to the Roman Republic. Under Claudius, the name was changed to Claudioconium, and under Hadrian to Colonia Aelia Hadriana. Paul and Barnabas preached in Iconium during their 1st Missionary Journey, c. 47 - 48 A.D., and Paul and Silas probably visited it again during Paul's 2nd Missionary Journey, c. 50 A.D. After non-believers in Iconium attempted to stone him, Paul fled to Lystra and Derbe. This is also mentioned in the Second Letter to Timothy.
RP86549. Bronze AE 27, vA Lykaoniens 270; SNGvA 8647; BMC Lycaonia p. 4, 3; RPC I 3544; SNG Paris 2282; SNG Cop 4; SNG Fitzwilliam 5211, VF, toned, reverse slightly off center, light marks and scratches, weight 10.068 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 0o, Iconium (Konya, Turkey) mint, 62 - 65 A.D.; obverse NEPWN KAICAP CEBACTOC (counterclockwise from lower right), laureate head right; reverse ΠOΠΠAIA CEBACTH KΛAY∆EIKO,NIEWN (counterclockwise from lower right, ending in exergue), Poppaea (as Kore) seated left on low throne, poppy in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins, ex CNG e-auction 110 (16 Mar 2005), lot 119; scarce; $140.00 (€119.00)
 


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D., Hierapolis, Phrygia in Homonoia with Sardis

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This coin commemorates the homonoia (alliance) between Phrygia and Sardis. Cities in Thrace and Asia minor sometimes formed alliances with other cities. The competition for prestige and rivalry between cities in the East was intense. Alliances could enhance a city’s status by aligning either with many cities or with particularly important ones. Homonoia was part of civic "foreign policy" and might have involved the exchange of delegates and joint celebrations and sacrifices. At least 87 cities issued homonoia coins celebrating their alliances.
RP77255. Bronze AE 30, cf. Franke-Nolle, type VI, 848 ff. var. (Vs.C/Rs.-, unlisted reverse die); SNGvA 3668; SNG Tübingen 4054; Lindgren III 596, aF, obverse rough, weight 10.243 g, maximum diameter 30.3 mm, die axis 180o, Phrygia, Hierapolis (near Pamukkale, Turkey) mint, Oct 253 - c. Jun 260 A.D.; obverse AY• K• - ΠOY• ΛIK• OYAΛEPAN/OC, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front, round countermark on face; reverse IEPAΠOΛE/ITΩN - KE - CAP∆IANΩN NEWK/OPΩN, Apollo on left, standing right, plectrum in right hand, kithara in left hand; cult statue of Kore facing, wearing kalathos and veil, OMONOYA in exergue; very rare; $135.00 (€114.75)
 


Syracuse, Sicily, Hieron II, c. 275 - 215 B.C.

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Hieron II was tyrant and then king of Syracuse, c. 270 - 215 B.C. His rule brought 50 years of peace and prosperity. Syracuse became one of the most renowned capitals of antiquity. He enlarged the theater and built an immense altar. The literary figure Theocritus and the philosopher Archimedes lived under his rule. After struggling against the Mamertini, he eventually allied with Rome.
GB85340. Bronze hemilitron, Calciati II p. 347, 191; BMC Sicily p. 219, 620; SNG ANS 578 (Agathokles); SNG München 1225 (same); HGC 2 1469 (S); SNG Cop 865 var. (IA above bull), F, nice style, dark green patina, tight flan, weight 5.293 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 270o, Syracuse mint, c. 275 - 269 B.C.; obverse ΣYPAKOΣIΩN, head of Kore-Persephone left, wearing earrings and necklace, hair rolled and bound with barley wreath, poppy head behind neck; reverse bull butting left, club over I (magistrate initial) above, IE (magistrate initials) in exergue; $65.00 (€55.25)
 


Thurium (Thurioi), Lucania, Italy, 280 - 213 B.C.

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Beautiful Persephone lived a peaceful life far away from the other deities, a goddess within Nature herself before the days of planting seeds and nurturing plants. She was innocently picking flowers when Hades, god of the Underworld, burst through a cleft in the earth and abducted her. While Demeter searched desperately for her daughter she neglected the earth and caused nothing to grow. Zeus, pressed by the cries of hungry people, determined to force Hades to return Persephone. However, Hades had tricked Persephone into eating pomegranate seeds, and because anyone who consumed food or drink in the Underworld was doomed to spend eternity there, she is forced return to the underworld for a period each year. Explaining the seasons, when Demeter and her daughter are reunited, the Earth flourishes with vegetation and color, but for the months each year when Persephone returns to the underworld, the earth becomes barren.
GI84868. Bronze AE 17, SNG Cop 1513, HN Italy 1932, SNG ANS -, SNG München -, BMC Italy -, VF, centered on a tight flan, encrustation, corrosion, weight 3.567 g, maximum diameter 16.6 mm, die axis 180o, Thourioi mint, 280 - 213 B.C.; obverse ΘOYPIA, head of Kore Persephone (or Demeter) left, wreathed in grain; reverse bull butting left, IΣTI above, fish left in exergue; ex Certified Coin Exchange; rare; $60.00 (€51.00)
 







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Persephone (Kore)