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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Animals ▸ GoatView Options:  |  |  | 

Goats on Ancient Coins

Amphipolis, Macedonia, c. 168 - 149 B.C.

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On 22 June 168 B.C., Lucius Aemilius Paullus Macedonicus won the decisive Battle of Pydna. Perseus of Macedonia was made prisoner and the Third Macedonian War ended. Paullus executed 500 Macedonians, exiled many more to Italy and confiscated their belongings in the name of Rome but according to Plutarch, keeping too much to himself. On the return to Rome in 167 BC, his legions were displeased with their share of the plunder. To keep them happy, Paullus stopped in Epirus, a kingdom suspected of sympathizing with Macedonia; 70 towns were sacked, 150,000 people enslaved, and the region was left bankrupt. Paullus' return to Rome was glorious. With the immense plunder collected in Macedonia and Epirus, he celebrated a spectacular triumph, featuring the captured king of Macedonia himself. The senate awarded him the cognomen Macedonicus.
GB83472. Bronze AE 19, BMC Macedonia p. 48, 40 - 41; AMNG III 51; SNG Cop -; SNG Evelpidis -, Nice VF, attractive style, nice green patina, weight 5.610 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, c. 168 - 149 B.C.; obverse ivy-wreathed head of Dionysos right; reverse goat standing right, AMΦIΠO/ΛEITΩN in two lines, starting above, ending in exergue; scarce; $170.00 SALE PRICE $153.00


Ainos, Thrace, c. 427 - 424 B.C.

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Aenus, Enez, Turkey today, was on the southeastern coast of Thrace, near the mouth of the Hebrus River, not far from the Melas Gulf (modern Gulf of Saros), which is formed by the Thracian Chersonesus to the east. The city was said to be founded (or at least settled) by Aeolian migrants from Lesbos. Its mythical and eponymous founder was said to be Aeneus, a son of the god Apollo and father of Cyzicus. Another mythical ruler, named Poltys, son of Poseidon, entertained Heracles when he came to Aenus. In the Iliad, Homer mentions that the leaders of Troy's Thracian allies, Acamas and Peiros, came from Aenus.
GS68735. Silver diobol, May Ainos 176 - 204, AMNG II 303, SNG Cop 405, SNG Lockett 1164, Pozzi 1033, McClean 3892, F, grainy, weight 1.167 g, maximum diameter 10.5 mm, die axis 45o, Ainos mint, c. 427 - 424 B.C.; obverse head of Hermes right, wearing petasos; reverse AIN, goat standing to right, coiled snake (control symbol) lower right; $125.00 SALE PRICE $113.00


Himera, Sicily, c. 420 - 409 B.C.

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In 409 B.C., Carthage attacked Himera. The city was unprepared; its fortifications weak. At first they were supported about 4000 auxiliaries from Syracuse, but their general, Diocles, seized with panic for the safety of Syracuse itself, abandoned Himera. The city was utterly destroyed, its buildings, even its temples, were razed to the ground. More than 3000 prisoners were put to death by General Hannibal Mago as a human sacrifice to the memory of his grandfather General Hamilcar who had been defeated at the Battle of Himera in 480 B.C.
GB67658. Bronze tetras, Calciati I, p. 42, 31; SNG ANS 1339; Laffaille 149; SNG Cop -, aF, weight 2.200 g, maximum diameter 15.2 mm, die axis 90o, Himera (Termini, Sicily, Italy) mint, c. 420 - 409 B.C.; obverse Pan on a goat prancing right, nude but for chlamys fluttering in the wind behind, preparing to blow on conch in right, thyrsus in left over shoulder, three pellets under goat between legs; reverse [IMEΠAION], Nike flying left, apluster with dangling fillets in extended right, fold of long chiton in left; $75.00 SALE PRICE $67.50


Kelenderis, Cilicia, 425 - 400 B.C.

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The land around Kelenderis was inadequate for farming but, apparently from the coins, suitable for raising goats. On the plateau behind the hills there were vineyards and olive trees, rich sources of minerals, especially iron and woods, mainly pine and cedar, which were essential for ship building. The town was connected to the Central Anatolian Plateau with suitable passages in the valleys, but it was mainly a port, connected with Cyprus and other countries lying on the Mediterranean coasts.
GS65748. Silver obol, BMC Lycaonia p. 56, 32; Gktrk 6 var. (Pegasos left); SNG BnF -; SNG Levante -; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -, VF, toned, some porosity, weight 0.797 g, maximum diameter 9.5 mm, die axis 270o, Kelenderis mint, 425 - 400 B.C.; obverse forepart of Pegasus right, curved wings, circle of dots; reverse KE (upper right), forepart of goat left, head turned back right; ex CNG e-Auction 185, lot 229 (27 Mar 2013); ex Kelly J. Krizan M.D. Collection; CNG Auction 25, lot 362 (24 Mar 1993); very rare; $65.00 SALE PRICE $58.50


Valerian II, Caesar, Early 256 - 258 A.D.

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The infant Jupiter was suckled by the goat Amaltheia on Mount Ida.
RA69007. Silver antoninianus, Gbl MIR 907e, SRCV III 10731, RIC V 3 (Lugdunum), RSC IV 26, F, some mint luster, but struck with worn dies, weight 2.903 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 180o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne) mint, 1st emission, 257 - 258 A.D.; obverse VALERIANVS CAES, radiate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse IOVI CRESCENTI, child Jupiter riding right on goat, looking back, raising right hand; $60.00 SALE PRICE $54.00


Aigai, Aiolis, 3rd Century B.C.

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Aegae (or Aigai) means place of goats and was the name of many cities of antiquity. Aegae, Aeolis was located at the mid-point between the modern cities of zmir, Manisa, Bergama and Aliaa.
GB90741. Bronze AE 9, SNG Cop 2; SNGvA 1593; BMC Troas p. 95, 7; SGCV II 4166; SNG Munchen -, VF, green patina, weight 0.880 g, maximum diameter 9.3 mm, die axis 135o, Aigai mint, 3rd century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse AIΓAE, head and neck of goat right; $45.00 SALE PRICE $40.50


Aigeai, Cilicia, c. Late 3rd - Early 2nd Century B.C.

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Aegeai (various spellings, including Aigeae) means place of goats in Greek and was the name of many cities of antiquity. Aigeai, on the north-western shore of the Gulf of Issos, was the third largest city in Cilicia. It had a very important temple of Asklepios, which was considered a great privilege and which brought many visitors to the city.
GB78012. Bronze AE 20, Bloesch 1 - 7; BMC Lycaonia p. 22, 13; SNG BnF -; SNG Levante -; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -, F, rough green patina, weight 8.128 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 0o, Aigeai mint, c. Late 3rd - Early 2nd Century B.C.; obverse head of Athena right in crested Corinthian helmet, hair in long curls on neck; reverse goat standing left, AIΓEAIΩN above; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $25.00 (22.25)







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Catalog current as of Sunday, April 23, 2017.
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Goats