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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Thrace & Moesia| ▸ |Kallatis||View Options:  |  |  | 

Kallatis, Thrace

Kallatis was founded on the Black Sea by Heraclea Pontica in the 6th century B.C. In Greek Kallatis means "the beautiful." Its first silver coinage was minted approximately 350 B.C. In 72 B.C., Kallatis was conquered by the Roman general Lucullus and was included in the Roman province of Moesia Inferior. Throughout the 2nd century A.D., the city built defensive fortifications. Kallatis suffered multiple invasions in the 3rd century A.D. but recovered in the 4th century A.D. to regain its status as an important trade hub and port city. Today Kallatis is called Mangalia, the oldest city in Romania.

Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C.

|Kallatis|, |Kingdom| |of| |Thrace,| |Lysimachos,| |305| |-| |281| |B.C.|, |AE| |13|
Lysimachus, one of Alexander the Great's personal bodyguards, was appointed strategos (general) in Thrace and Chersonesos after Alexander's death. He became one of the diadochi (successors of Alexander) who were initially generals and governors, but who continuously allied and warred with each other and eventually divided the empire. In 309, he founded his capital Lysimachia in a commanding situation on the neck connecting the Chersonesos with the mainland. In 306, he followed the example of Antigonus in taking the title of king, ruling Thrace, Asia Minor and Macedonia. In 281, he was killed in battle against Seleucus, another successor of Alexander.
GB92902. Bronze AE 13, Mller pl. XLII, 14, SNG Cop 1168, SGCV II 6822, VF, dark green patina, scratches, earthen deposits, a few patina, weight 2.733 g, maximum diameter 12.8 mm, die axis 180o, Kallatis (Mangalia, Romania) mint, c. 297 - 281 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right clad in Nemean Lion's scalp headdress; reverse BAΣI/ΛYΣI within a wreath of grain; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00


Kallatis, Thrace, c. 300 - 250 B.C.

|Kallatis|, |Kallatis,| |Thrace,| |c.| |300| |-| |250| |B.C.|, |drachm|
"Kallatis was an apoikia of Pontic Heraklea and was founded in accordance with an oracle at the time when Amyntas was the ruler of Macedonia.4 While scholars do not doubt the foundation of Kallatis by Heraklea, the date of its establishment is a matter of debate though, since it is not clear if Ps. Schymnos was writing about Amyntas I or Amyntas III. Amyntas I ruled in the second part of 6th century, while Amyntas III ruled between 393 and 370/69 BCE. Romanian scholars favor the earliest date although there is no clear archaeological evidence to prove this. When it comes to the territory of Kallatis, the earliest archaeological findings are dated in the 4th century BCE. If the earliest date is accepted, it means that Kallatis was the earliest Megarian colony on the western shore of the Black Sea."-- Greek cities on the western coast of the Black Sea:Orgame, Histria, Tomis, and Kallatis (7th to 1stcentury BCE) by Smaranda Andrews
SH34937. Silver drachm, SNG Cop 176, SNG BM 202, aEF, finest style for the issue, high relief, finder's scrape on reverse, weight 5.172 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 0o, Kallatis (Mangalia, Romania) mint, c. 300 - 250 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse stalk of grain and club with handle down on left, KAΛΛATIA upward in center, bow in bow case on right; SOLD


Kallatis, Moesia Inferior, Under Roman Rule, 2nd - 3rd Century A.D.

|Kallatis|, |Kallatis,| |Moesia| |Inferior,| |Under| |Roman| |Rule,| |2nd| |-| |3rd| |Century| |A.D.|, |AE| |20|
The Disocuri were Castor and Pollux (or Polydeuces), the twin sons of Leda and brothers of Helen of Troy. The twins shared the same mother but had different fathers. Pollux, the son of Zeus, was immortal but Castor was mortal. When Castor died, Pollux asked to let him share his own immortality with his twin to keep them together. They were transformed into the Gemini constellation and the two spend alternate days on Olympus (as gods) and in Hades (as deceased mortals). The pair were regarded as the patrons of sailors, to whom they appeared as St. Elmo's fire.
RP26691. Bronze AE 20, SNG Stancomb 865 var. (no K or torch, Dioscuri right); BMC Thrace p. 22, 9 var. (same), gVF+, minor pitting, weight 5.643 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 0o, Kallatis (Mangalia, Romania) mint, obverse bust of Demeter right, veiled and wreathed in grain, torch right, K left, all in a circle of dots; reverse Dioscuri riding left, in circle of dots; rare; SOLD







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REFERENCES|

Corpus Nummorum Thracorum - http://www.corpus-nummorum.eu/
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints. (San Mateo, 1989).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Moushmov, N. Ancient Coins of the Balkan Peninsula. (1912).
Mller, L. Die Mnzen Des Thracishen Konigs Lysimacus. (Copenhagen, 1858).
Mller, L. Numismatique d?Alexandre le Grand; Appendice les monnaies de Philippe II et III, et Lysimaque. (Copenhagen, 1855-58).
Pick, B. Die antiken Mnzen von Dacien und Moesien, Die antiken Mnzen Nord-Griechenlands Vol. I/I. (Berlin, 1898).
Poole, R.S. ed. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Thrace, etc. (London, 1877).
Price, M. J. The Coinage in the name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus. (Zurich-London, 1991).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Volume 1: Europe. (London, 1978).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Volume 2: Volume 2: Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 2: Macedonia and Thrace. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Mnchen Staatlische Mnzsammlung, Part 7: Taurische Chersonesos, Sarmatien, Dacia, Moesia superior, Moesia inferior. (Berlin, 1985).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IX, British Museum, Part 1: The Black Sea. (London, 1993).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XI, The William Stancomb Collection of Coins of the Black Sea Region. (Oxford, 2000).
Wartenberg, U. and J.H. Kagan, "Some Comments on a New Hoard from the Balkan Sea" in Travaux Le Rider.
Varbanov, I. Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Vol. I: Dacia, Moesia Superior & Moesia Inferior. (Bourgas, Bulgaria, 2005).

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