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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Provincial| ▸ |Roman Arabia||View Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Provincial Coins of Arabia
Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Charachmoba, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Elagabalus,| |16| |May| |218| |-| |11| |March| |222| |A.D.,| |Charachmoba,| |Arabia|, |AE| |23|
Coins of Charachmoba (Kerak, Jordan today) were struck only for Elagabalus and are very rare. Kerak has been inhabited since at least the Iron Age. It was an important city for the Moabites. In the Bible it is called Qer Harreseth or Kir of Moab and was subject to the Assyrian empire; in the Books of Kings (16:9) and Book of Amos (1:5, 9:7), it is mentioned as the place where the Syrians went before they settled in the regions north of Palestine, and to which Tiglath-Pileser III sent the prisoners after the conquest of Damascus. It became important in the late Hellenistic Period, and eventually fell under Nabataean rule. Rome took it in 105 A.D., with support from the Arab Ghassanid tribe (who still live in there). Today Karak is best known for the crusader's Kerak Castle.
RP72143. Bronze AE 23, Spijkerman 1; Rosenberger 1; BMC Arabia p. 27, 1; Sofaer p. 157 and pl. 134, 1; Meshorer City-Coins 276 var. (retrograde rev leg); SNG ANS -, VF, nice green patina, a few pits, weight 7.750 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 135o, Charachmoba (Kerak, Jordan) mint, 16 May 218 - 11 Mar 222 A.D.; obverse AV K M AV ANTWNINO, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind, flower (star?) in right field; reverse XAPAX MWBA, Tyche standing facing, head left, wearing kalathos, chiton, and mantle, holding rudder by tiller in right, cornucopia in left; none of the references mention the flower (or star) on the obverse, but it may have originally been present on most specimens; very rare; SOLD


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Charachmoba, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Elagabalus,| |16| |May| |218| |-| |11| |March| |222| |A.D.,| |Charachmoba,| |Arabia|, |AE| |20|
Coins of Charachmoba (Kerak, Jordan today) were struck only for Elagabalus and are very rare. Kerak has been inhabited since at least the Iron Age. It was an important city for the Moabites. In the Bible it is called Qer Harreseth or Kir of Moab and was subject to the Assyrian empire; in the Books of Kings (16:9) and Book of Amos (1:5, 9:7), it is mentioned as the place where the Syrians went before they settled in the regions north of Palestine, and to which Tiglath-Pileser III sent the prisoners after the conquest of Damascus. It became important in the late Hellenistic Period, and eventually fell under Nabataean rule. Rome took it in 105 A.D., with support from the Arab Ghassanid tribe (who still live in there). Today Karak is best known for the crusader's Kerak Castle.
RP63100. Bronze AE 20, Meshorer City-Coins 275, Spijkerman 5, Rosenberger 2, SNG ANS -, F/aF, weight 5.235 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 180o, Charachmoba (Kerak, Jordan) mint, 16 May 218 - 11 Mar 222 A.D.; obverse A K M AV ANTΩNINO, laureate head right; reverse XAPAXMΩBA, priest (Elagabalus?) on right, seated left facing a high platform with steps (the Altar of Dusares?), on top of the platform: a column flanked by baetyls all on a low base and a wall or panel behind about half as high as the column; green patina with desert earthen highlighting, interesting type; very rare; SOLD


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Rabbathmoba, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Rabbathmoba,| |Arabia|, |AE| |27|
Rabbathmoba, probably the Biblical Ir-Moab, was conquered by Alexander Jannaeus. Its ruins are 18 kilometers north of Kerak in Jordan.
SH52129. Bronze AE 27, Spijkerman 6, SNG ANS 1414 var. (laureate head), VF, weight 15.163 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rabbathmoba mint, undated variety, c. 209 - 211 A.D.; obverse AVT KΛC - CEOVHPU, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse PABAΘ−MΩBA, cult statue of Ares standing facing in military dress on decorated base, sword erect in right, spear and round shield in left, flanked by torch-like flaming altars; rare; SOLD







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REFERENCES

Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (1992 - ).
Hill, G.F. Catalogue of the Greek Coins in the British Museum: Arabia, Mesopotamia and Persia. (London, 1922).
Kindler, A. The Coinage of Bostra. (Oxford, 1983).
Lindgren, H.C. and F.L. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coins of Asia Minor and the Levant. (1985).
Lindgren, H.C. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins from the Lindgren Collection. (1993).
Meshorer, Y. City-Coins of Eretz Israel and the Decapolis in the Roman Period. (Jerusalem, 1985).
Meshorer, Y. Nabataean Coins. Qedem 3. (Jerusalem, 1975).
Metcalf, W.E. "The Tell Kalak Hoard and Trajan's Arabian Mint" in ANSMN 20 (1975).
Rosenberger, M. The Rosenberger Israel Collection Volume IV: The Coinage of Eastern Palestine, and legionary countermarks, Bar-Kochba overstruck. (Jerusalem, 1978).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Spijkerman, A. The Coins of the Decapolis and Provincia Arabia. (Jerusalem, 1978).
Sydenham, E. The Coinage of Caesarea in Cappadocia, with supplement by A. Malloy. (New York, 1978).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Volume 7: Cyprus to India. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain, Volume IV, Fitzwilliam Museum, Leake and General Collections, Part 8: Syria-Nabataea. (London, 1971).(London, 1940-1971).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, University of Glasgow, Part 2: Roman Provincial Coins: Cyprus-Egypt. (Oxford, 2008).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Schweiz II, Katalog der Sammlung Jean-Pierre Righetti im Bernischen Historischen Museum. (Bern, 1993).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, USA, The Collection of the American Numismatic Society, Part 6: Palestine - South Arabia. (New York, 1981).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).
van Alfen, Peter. "A Die Study of the Eastern Arabian Abiel Coinage," in Coinage of the Caravan Kingdoms. American Numismatic Society (New York, 2010) pp. 549-594.

Catalog current as of Monday, September 28, 2020.
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