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Roman Syria-Palestina, Jewish, Lead Bulla Seal, 7 Branched Menorah, c. 5th - 6th Century A.D.

|Seals|, |Roman| |Syria-Palestina,| |Jewish,| |Lead| |Bulla| |Seal,| |7| |Branched| |Menorah,| |c.| |5th| |-| |6th| |Century| |A.D.|NEW
A bulla (plural, bullae) is a lump of clay or lead molded around a cord and stamped with a seal that identifies the sender. With a bulla in place, a container cannot be violated without visible damage to either the bulla or the cord, revealing the tampering. Bullae depicting a menorah are known but very rare and not well documented. Dattari-Savio p. 327, 3 is a 1901 rubbing of a very similar menorah sealing. Michael Still lists two menorah sealings in his thesis on Roman seals, 1696 with a Latin inscription reverse, 1765 with a Hebrew inscription reverse. The recently published catalogue of the Vossen collection by Gert Boersema and Bill Dalzell, has two Menorah seals, numbers 181 and 182, both with blank reverses. There are also a few examples known from auctions. A FORVM member posted a bulla of this exact type from his collection on the Classical Numismatic Discussion on the Forum Ancient Coins website. We received three examples of this type on consignment, all with the same fire damage, suggesting they were found together.
JD98654. Lead bulla (tag seal), VF, white lead patina, light earthen deposits, raised bumps from exposure to an ancient fire that heated and expanded air bubbles within the lead, weight 4.030 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, c. 5th - 6th Century A.D.; obverse seven branched menorah with tripod base; reverse lulav, uncertain Syriac inscription; very rare; $750.00 SALE PRICE $670.00


Roman Syria-Palestina, Jewish, Lead Bulla Seal, 7 Branched Menorah, c. 5th - 6th Century A.D.

|Seals|, |Roman| |Syria-Palestina,| |Jewish,| |Lead| |Bulla| |Seal,| |7| |Branched| |Menorah,| |c.| |5th| |-| |6th| |Century| |A.D.|NEW
A bulla (plural, bullae) is a lump of clay or lead molded around a cord and stamped with a seal that identifies the sender. With a bulla in place, a container cannot be violated without visible damage to either the bulla or the cord, revealing the tampering. Bullae depicting a menorah are known but very rare and not well documented. Dattari-Savio p. 327, 3 is a 1901 rubbing of a very similar menorah sealing. Michael Still lists two menorah sealings in his thesis on Roman seals, 1696 with a Latin inscription reverse, 1765 with a Hebrew inscription reverse. The recently published catalogue of the Vossen collection by Gert Boersema and Bill Dalzell, has two Menorah seals, numbers 181 and 182, both with blank reverses. There are also a few examples known from auctions. A FORVM member posted a bulla of this exact type from his collection on the Classical Numismatic Discussion on the Forum Ancient Coins website. We received three examples of this type on consignment, all with the same fire damage, suggesting they were found together.
JD98655. Lead bulla (tag seal), VF, chip on reverse, light earthen deposits, raised bumps from exposure to an ancient fire that heated and expanded air bubbles within the lead, weight 4.679 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, c. 5th - 6th Century A.D.; obverse seven branched menorah with tripod base; reverse lulav, uncertain Syriac inscription; very rare; $750.00 SALE PRICE $670.00


Roman Syria-Palestina, Jewish, Lead Bulla Seal, 7 Branched Menorah, c. 5th - 6th Century A.D.

|Seals|, |Roman| |Syria-Palestina,| |Jewish,| |Lead| |Bulla| |Seal,| |7| |Branched| |Menorah,| |c.| |5th| |-| |6th| |Century| |A.D.|NEW
A bulla (plural, bullae) is a lump of clay or lead molded around a cord and stamped with a seal that identifies the sender. With a bulla in place, a container cannot be violated without visible damage to either the bulla or the cord, revealing the tampering. Bullae depicting a menorah are known but very rare and not well documented. Dattari-Savio p. 327, 3 is a 1901 rubbing of a very similar menorah sealing. Michael Still lists two menorah sealings in his thesis on Roman seals, 1696 with a Latin inscription reverse, 1765 with a Hebrew inscription reverse. The recently published catalogue of the Vossen collection by Gert Boersema and Bill Dalzell, has two Menorah seals, numbers 181 and 182, both with blank reverses. There are also a few examples known from auctions. A FORVM member posted a bulla of this exact type from his collection on the Classical Numismatic Discussion on the Forum Ancient Coins website. We received three examples of this type on consignment, all with the same fire damage, suggesting they were found together.
JD98656. Lead bulla (tag seal), VF/Fair, light earthen deposits, raised bumps from exposure to an ancient fire that heated and expanded air bubbles within the lead, c. 5th - 6th Century A.D.; obverse seven branched menorah with tripod base; reverse lulav, uncertain Syriac inscription (obscure); very rare; $380.00 SALE PRICE $340.00


Judean Kingdom, Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 104 - 76 B.C.

|Alexander| |Jannaeus|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |Jannaeus| |(Yehonatan),| |104| |-| |76| |B.C.|NEW
The prutah was equal in value to 1/2 a Roman quadrans. -- Talmud Jerus., Kedushin 58d, written c. 200 A.D.
JD97685. Bronze prutah, Hendin 1145, Meshorer TJC P, Meshorer AJC E, HGC 10 638, VF, highlighting earthen deposits, irregular shape, reverse edge beveled, obv. a little off center, weight 1.958 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, 103 - 76 B.C.; obverse Paleo-Hebrew inscription: Yehonatan the High Priest and the Council of the Jews, within wreath; reverse double cornucopia adorned with ribbons, pomegranate between horns; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


Judean Kingdom, Herod the Great, 37 - 4 B.C.

|Herod| |the| |Great|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Herod| |the| |Great,| |37| |-| |4| |B.C.|NEW
Two prutot was equal to a Roman quadrans. -- Talmud Jerus., Kedushin 58d, written c. 200 A.D.
JD97695. Bronze 2 prutot, Meshorer TJC p. 222 & pl. 44, 48a; Sofaer p. 258 & pl. 207, 20; Hendin 1178; RPC Online I 4905; HGC 10 654, aF, off center, uneven strike, edge cracks, reverse edge beveled, weight 3.846 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, Jerusalem mint, c. 30 B.C.; obverse HPΩ∆OY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (Greek: of King Herod), cross surrounded by closed diadem; reverse dish on tripod table, flanked by two straight upright palm branches; from an Israeli collection; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Herod Archelaus, Ethnarch of Samaria, Judea, and Idumea, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.

|Herod| |Archelaus|, |Herod| |Archelaus,| |Ethnarch| |of| |Samaria,| |Judea,| |and| |Idumea,| |4| |B.C.| |-| |6| |A.D.|NEW
The anchor was adopted from the Selukids, who used it to symbolize their naval strength. Anchors are often depicted upside down, as they would be seen hung on the side of a boat ready for use.
JD97705. Bronze prutah, Meshorer TJC 69b; BMC Palestine p. 235, 39; Meshorer AJC II p. 239, 2b; Hendin 1193; RPC I 4912, VF, weight 1.605 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 180o, Jerusalem mint, 4 - 6 B.C.; obverse HPω∆OY (of Herod), anchor with long slender arms; reverse EΘ/AN (Ethnarch), surrounded by oak wreath; from an Israeli collection; scarce; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


Gargara, Troas, c. 440 - 400 B.C.

|Troas|, |Gargara,| |Troas,| |c.| |440| |-| |400| |B.C.|NEW
Gargara, in Troas, was originally located on the heights of Mount Ida, but its citizens relocated to the foot of the mountain. In earlier times settlements relied on natural strongholds for protection against frequent attacks by marauding bands or pirates. As civilization took hold, the commercial opportunities afforded by easier access became more important.
GA97792. Silver hemiobol, unpublished in standard refs.; see Numismatik Naumann auction 88 (5 Apr 2020), 142; Savoca Numismatik auction 84 (30 Aug 2020), 97, VF, toned, a little rough, tiny edge chips, weight 0.319 g, maximum diameter 7.1 mm, Gargara (Ayvacik, Turkey) mint, c. 440 - 400 B.C.; obverse female head left; reverse Γ - A across field at center divided by an incuse "basketball" pattern divided into six compartments; extremely rare; $130.00 SALE PRICE $117.00


Judaea, Valerius Gratus, Roman Prefect Under Tiberius, 15 - 26 A.D., Unofficial(?)

|Valerius| |Gratus|, |Judaea,| |Valerius| |Gratus,| |Roman| |Prefect| |Under| |Tiberius,| |15| |-| |26| |A.D.,| |Unofficial(?)|NEW
The blundered obverse inscription indicates this specimen may be unofficial. Crude examples and even retrograde inscriptions are known for the type, and apparently official specimens. We were unable to find an example similarly as crude as this coin.

Julia on the obverse, refers to Livia, wife of Augustus and mother of Tiberius. Livia took the name Julia Augusta after Augustus died.
JD98158. Bronze prutah, cf. Hendin 1333b, Meshorer TJC 317a, RPC I 4959, Sofaer Collection 12 (all Jerusalem mint official specimens), VF, highlighting earthen deposits, ragged sprue cuts, edge split, weight 1.715 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 240o, Jerusalem (or unofficial?) mint, 15 A.D.; obverse OY/AIΛ (Greek: Julia, blundered) in two lines within wreath; reverse palm frond, flanked by L - B (year 2 of Tiberius); rare variant; $180.00 (€147.60)


German States, Brunswick-Lüneburg, Albert I the Tall, 1252 - 1279

|Germany|, |German| |States,| |Brunswick-Lüneburg,| |Albert| |I| |the| |Tall,| |1252| |-| |1279|NEW
Albert the Tall, a member of the House of Welf, was Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg from 1252 and the first ruler of the newly created Principality of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel from 1269 until his death on 15 August 1279.

Bracteates (a type of coin, not a denomination) were made with very thin metal and were struck using a single die with the flan placed on a leather covered block, thus giving an intaglio reverse.
ME92107. Silver bracteate, Denicke 166, Berger 707, Bonhoff 398, Welter 232 l., VF, toned, cracks, weight 0.741 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 0o, 1252 - 1279; obverse lion walking left, head turned facing, tail curving above, star (control) below between fore and back legs; reverse incuse of the obverse; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

|Antoninus| |Pius|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.|NEW
In 148, Antoninus Pius hosted a series of grand games to celebrate Rome's 900th anniversary.
RS97928. Silver denarius, RIC III 177D(g), RSC II 242, BMCRE IV 654 var. (bust left noted), Strack III 190, SRCV II -, gF, radiating flow lines, light toning, light scratches, edge ragged with small cracks, weight 2.642 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, Dec 148 - Dec 149 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XII, laureate head left; reverse COS IIII, Aequitas standing slightly left, head left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; rare bust left; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00




  







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