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Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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Victory or Nike is seen with wings in most statues and paintings, with one of the most famous being the Winged Victory of Samothrace. Most other winged deities in the Greek pantheon had shed their wings by Classical times. Nike is the goddess of strength, speed, and victory. Nike was a very close acquaintance of Athena and is thought to have stood in Athena's outstretched hand in the statue of Athena located in the Parthenon. Victory or Nike is also one of the most commonly portrayed figures on Greek and Roman coins.
RS92475. Silver denarius, RIC IV 423 (S) var. (...CAE L SEV...); RSC III 696 var. (same), BMCRE V p. 98, W393 var. (same, VICT AVG); SRCV II -; Hunter III -, EF, toned, minor encrustations, die wear, some letters unstruck, edge cracks, weight 3.188 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 0o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 194 - 195 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, laureate head right; reverse VICTOR AVG, Victory advancing right holding trophy in both hands; extremely rare, this is the only example of this variety known to FORVM; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $300.00 (€264.00)


Belgic Celts, Bellovaci, c. 100 - 57 B.C.

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The Bellovaci, among the most powerful and numerous of the Belgian tribes of north-eastern Gaul, were conquered by Julius Caesar in 57 B.C. The name survives today in the French city of Beauvais, called by the Romans Caesaromagus. The Bellovaci territory extended from modern Beauvais to the Oise River, along the coast. When Caesar learned the Bellovaci intended to conquer the territory of their Suessiones neighbors, he decided to oppose them and prove Roman superiority. The Bellovaci were surprised by the arrival of Roman troops but, despite his force of about 30,000 men, Caesar was intimidated by the size of the Bellovaci forces. Neither initiated battle. The Belgic warriors set traps in the woods for Roman foragers. Caesar called for reinforcements and built a bridge across a marsh to position his troops within range of the Bellovaci camp. The Bellovaci retreated and then attempted an ambush. Caesar learned of their plan and had reinforcements ready to attack, but the Bellovaci were defeated and their general Correus killed, even before he arrived. After the battle, the Bellovaci were impressed by Caesar's clemency but some of their leaders fled to Britain. Belgae_Map

CE92095. Bronze AE 16, cf. Delestrée-Tache I 307, CCCBM III 1, Scheers Traité 601, De la Tour 7276, VF, attractive olive green patina, obverse off center, weight 2.676 g, maximum diameter 15.8 mm, die axis 270o, c. 100 - 57 B.C.; obverse figure running right, ornaments around; reverse human-headed horse galloping right, one large globule above and another below; ex CGB Numismatique Paris; rare; $230.00 (€202.40)


Gallic Celts, Sequani, c. 58 - 50 B.C., Time of Caesar's Gallic Wars

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In 71 B.C., the Sequani hired the Germanic Suebi under Ariovistus to cross the Rhine and help them defeat the Aedui. The Sequani were worse off after their victory - Ariovistus deprived them of a third of their territory, threatened to take another third, and subjugated them into semi-slavery. The Sequani appealed to Caesar, who drove back the Germanic tribesmen in 58 B.C., but at the same time obliged the Sequani to surrender all that they had gained from the Aedui. This so exasperated the Sequani that they joined in the revolt of Vercingetorix in 52 B.C. and shared in the defeat at Alesia. The Sequani refused to join the Gallic revolt against Rome in 69 A.D. and drove out rebels who invaded their territory. In recognition for their loyal service, Vesontio (Besancon) was made a Roman colony.Gaul

CE89066. Silver quinarius, CCBM II 346, Delestrée-Tache 3245, De la Tour 5405, Forrer 204, VF, toned, strike a bit flat, typical tight flan, weight 1.895 g, maximum diameter 14.1 mm, die axis 105o, Vesontio (Besancon, France) mint, c. 58 - 50 B.C.; obverse helmeted head left (Roma?), Q DOCI (Quintus Docirix) before counterclockwise; reverse bridled horse galloping left, Q DO[CI] (Quintus Docirix) above, [SAM F] (Samulali Filius, AM ligate) below; ex Frascatius Ancient Coins; $140.00 (€123.20)


Gadara, Decapolis, 64 - 63 B.C.

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This type and another similar anonymous year one of Rome type, have traditionally been attributed to Gadara. In 64/3 BC Roman troops under Pompey "liberated" the Greek cities conquered by the Judaean king Alexander Jannaeus. Pompey personally supervised reconstruction in Gadara. Commemorating these events, Gadara established the year 64/3 B.C. as the beginning of a new Pompeian era, replacing the previous Seleukid era. Hoover says the attribution to Gadara is in error; that the fabric and style suggest a mint in southern Syria. For now, at least, we retain the traditional attribution.
RP91034. Bronze AE 23, Meshorer City-Coins 217, Spijkerman 1, Rosenberg IV 1, HGC 10 381 (S), RPC I -, aVF, weight 11.043 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 0o, Gadara (Um Qais, Jordan) mint, 64 - 63 B.C.; obverse bust of Herakles left, draped with lion's skin, club on left shoulder, anepigraphic; reverse galley ram right, L A / PΩMHS (year 1 of Rome [Pompeian Era]) in two lines above, all within wreath; rare; $250.00 (€220.00)


Judaea, Marcus Ambibulus, Roman Prefect under Augustus, 9 - 12 A.D.

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In 6 A.D., Herod Archelaus, son of Herod the Great, was deposed and banished to Gaul by Augustus. Archelaus' part of his father's kingdom (including Judea, Samaria, Idumea and Archelais) was (except for Archelais) organized as a Roman procuratorial province.
JD91400. Bronze prutah, Hendin 1330, Meshorer TJC 314, RPC I 4956, aF, rough, weight 1.742 g, maximum diameter 16.4 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, 9 - 10 A.D.; obverse KAICAPOC (of Caesar), barley head curved to right; reverse eight-branched date palm tree, bearing two bunches of dates, L - M (year 40 of Augustus) divided across lower field; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection, ex Pegasi Coins; $20.00 (€17.60)


Judaea, Marcus Ambibulus, Roman Prefect under Augustus, 9 - 12 A.D.

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After Herod's death, Caesarea was the seat of the Roman procurator and capital of Roman Palestine for about 500 years. A riot in 66 A.D. between Syrians and Jews in the city led to the First Jewish Revolt. Paul was delivered to Caesarea when his life was threatened in Jerusalem (Acts 9:30). From Caesarea, Paul departed to Tarsus, his birthplace. Paul met the church in Caesarea (Acts 18:22; 21:8,16). Finally, Paul was taken prisoner (Acts 23:23,33) and returned to Caesarea where he was tried before Festus and King Agrippa (Acts 25:1-4; 24:6-13).
JD91402. Bronze prutah, Hendin 1329, Meshorer TJC 313, RPC I 4955, aVF, green patina, earthen deposits, off center, edge crack, obverse edge beveled, weight 2.151 g, maximum diameter 16.4 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, 9 A.D.; obverse KAICAPOC (of Caesar), head of barley curved right; reverse eight-branched date palm tree, bearing two bunches of dates, L - ΛΘ (year 39); $50.00 (€44.00)


Judean Kingdom, Herod Agrippa I, 37 - 44 A.D.

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Agrippa was son of Aristobulus and Bernice, a grandson of Herod the Great. He spent his boyhood at the imperial court in Rome. His friend Caligula bestowed former territories of Philip and Herod Antipas. Claudius bestowed Judaea. He had James, the brother of John, executed (Acts 12:1-2) and imprisoned Peter (Acts 12:3-5).
JD91405. Bronze prutah, Hendin 1244, Meshorer TJC 120, RPC I 4981, SNG ANS 252, Sofaer 153, VF, light corrosion, off center, obverse edge beveled, weight 2.315 g, maximum diameter 16.8 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, 41 - 42 A.D.; obverse AΓPIΠA BACIΛEWC (King Agrippa), umbrella-like canopy with fringes; reverse three heads of barley between two leaves, flanked by L - ς (year 6); from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $45.00 (€39.60)


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG X

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Antony's legion X may have been disbanded by Augustus. The famous X Fretensis ('from the Channel') fought for Octavian. In 66 A.D., Legion X Fretensis moved to Judaea to suppress the revolt. In 68, the Xth destroyed the monastery of Qumran, where the Dead Sea Scrolls originated. In 70, the Xth camped on the Mount of Olives and used war machines to hurl 25 kg stones 400 meters at the ramparts of besieged Jerusalem. After a five month siege and the horrors of starvation, the city was taken and then completely destroyed. In the autumn of 72, the Xth, auxiliary troops, and thousands of Jewish prisoners erected a wall of circumvallation around Masada, the last Jewish stronghold. The Jewish defenders chose mass suicide before the final assault. After the revolt, the Xth was the sole legion in Judaea and garrisoned at Jerusalem. X Fretensis is recorded to have existed at least until the 410s.Legion X Camp

RR91406. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/24, Sydenham 1228, BMCRR II East 202, RSC I 38, Sear CRI 361, Nice VF, nice toning, bumps and marks, light porosity, spots of corrosion on edge, reverse a little off center, weight 3.342 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 180o, Patrae(?) mint, autumn 32 - spring 31 B.C.; obverse ANT•AVG / III VIR•R•P•C, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - X, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection, ex Pegasi Coins; $450.00 (€396.00)


Judean Kingdom, Herod the Great, 37 - 4 B.C.

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Herod the Great, a Roman client king of Judea, has been described as a madman who murdered his own family and a great many rabbis, as prepared to commit any crime in order to gratify his unbounded ambition, and as the greatest builder in Jewish history. He is known for his colossal building projects throughout Judea, including his expansion of the Second Temple in Jerusalem (Herod's Temple), the construction of the port at Caesarea Maritima, the fortress at Masada and Herodium. Vital details of his life are recorded in the works of the 1st century Roman-Jewish historian Josephus.
JD91409. Bronze 2 prutot, Hendin 1178a, Meshorer TJC 49, Sofaer Collection 19, RPC I 4905 var. (closed diadem), F, broad flan, green patina, a little rough and crude, edge crack, obverse edge beveled, weight 3.402 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, c. 30 - 29 B.C.; obverse HPΩ∆OY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (of King Herod), cross surrounded by open diadem; reverse plate on tripod table, flanked by erect palm branches; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $90.00 (€79.20)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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Virtus was a specific virtue in ancient Rome. It carried connotations of valor, manliness, excellence, courage, character, and worth, perceived as masculine strengths (from Latin vir, "man"). Virtus applied exclusively to a man's behavior in the public sphere, that is to the application of duty to the res publica in the cursus honorum. Private business was no place to earn virtus, even when it involved courage or feats of arms or other good qualities. There could be no virtue in exploiting one's manliness in the pursuit of personal wealth, for example. It was thus a frequently stated virtue of Roman emperors and was personified as the deity Virtus.
RA92326. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 234, Cohen VI 857, SRCV III 12063, Hunter IV 14 var. (R*E), Choice EF, well centered on a broad flan, much silvering, excellent portrait, weight 4.185 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Rome mint, emission 2, 277 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR PROBVS P F AVG, radiate bust left in imperial mantle, scepter surmounted by eagle in right hand; reverse VIRTVS AVGVSTI (to the valor of the Emperor), Virtus standing half left, helmeted head left, resting right hand on grounded shield, spear vertical in left hand, RE in exergue; $130.00 (€114.40)




  







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