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Lysimacheia, Thracian Chersonese, c. 245 - 225 B.C.

|Lysimacheia|, |Lysimacheia,| |Thracian| |Chersonese,| |c.| |245| |-| |225| |B.C.|NEW
Lysimachia was built by Lysimachus in 309 B.C. On the isthmus, it commanded the road from Sestos and mainland Thrace. To obtain inhabitants for his new city, Lysimachus destroyed neighboring Cardia and settled the inhabitants of it and other Chersonese cities here. Lysimachus made Lysimachia the capital of his kingdom and it must have rapidly risen to great splendor and prosperity.
GB93813. Bronze AE 17, SNG Cop 914; BMC Thrace p. 195, 4; HGC 3.2 1500 (S), VF, light green patina, earthen deposits, mild porosity, weight 4.097 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 0o, Lysimacheia (Eksemil, Turkey) mint, c. 245 - 225 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion's scalp headdress; reverse Nike standing left, raising wreath in right hand crowning city name, ΛYΣIMA,XEΩN starting downward on left and ending below, AN monogram over IΣE monogram (controls) on right; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $60.00 (49.20)


Kingdom of Bithynia, Prusias II Kynegos, 185 - 149 B.C.

|Kingdom| |of| |Bithynia|, |Kingdom| |of| |Bithynia,| |Prusias| |II| |Kynegos,| |185| |-| |149| |B.C.|NEW
Prusias II, son of Prusias I, inherited his father's name but not his character. He first joined with Eumenes of Pergamon in war against Pontus, but later turned on Pergamon and invaded. He was defeated and Pergamon demanded heavy reparations. Prusias sent his son Nicomedes II to Rome to ask for aid in reducing the payments. When Nicomedes revolted, Prusias II was murdered in the temple of Zeus at Nikomedia.

Like satyrs, centaurs were notorious for being wild, lusty, overly indulgent drinkers and carousers, violent when intoxicated, and generally uncultured delinquents. Chiron, by contrast, was intelligent, civilized and kind. He was not related directly to the other centaurs. He was the son of the Titan Cronus and the Oceanid Philyr. The other centaurs were spawned by the cloud Nephele on the slopes of Mount Pelion. Apollo taught the young Chiron the art of medicine, herbs, music, archery, hunting, gymnastics and prophecy, and made him rise above his beastly nature. He became a renowned teacher who mentored many of the greatest heroes of myth including the Argonauts Jason and Peleus, the physician Asklepios, and Achilles of Troy.
GB93824. Bronze AE 20, SNG Cop 635; SNGvA 255; BMC Pontus p. 211, 15 - 17; Rec Gen II.3 p. 225, 26; HGC 7 629; SGCV II 7266, gVF, well centered on a tight flan, light marks, weight 6.161 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 0o, Nikomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, c. 180 - 150 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wreathed with ivy; reverse centaur Chiron standing right playing lyre, cloak on shoulders flying behind, right foreleg raised, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on right, ΠPOUΣIOY downward on left, no monogram or control symbols; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $130.00 (106.60)


Kingdom of Bithynia, Prusias II Kynegos, 185 - 149 B.C.

|Kingdom| |of| |Bithynia|, |Kingdom| |of| |Bithynia,| |Prusias| |II| |Kynegos,| |185| |-| |149| |B.C.|NEW
Prusias II, son of Prusias I, inherited his father's name but not his character. He first joined with Eumenes of Pergamon in war against Pontus, but later turned on Pergamon and invaded. He was defeated and Pergamon demanded heavy reparations. Prusias sent his son Nicomedes II to Rome to ask for aid in reducing the payments. When Nicomedes revolted, Prusias II was murdered in the temple of Zeus at Nikomedia.

Like satyrs, centaurs were notorious for being wild, lusty, overly indulgent drinkers and carousers, violent when intoxicated, and generally uncultured delinquents. Chiron, by contrast, was intelligent, civilized and kind. He was not related directly to the other centaurs. He was the son of the Titan Cronus and the Oceanid Philyr. The other centaurs were spawned by the cloud Nephele on the slopes of Mount Pelion. Apollo taught the young Chiron the art of medicine, herbs, music, archery, hunting, gymnastics and prophecy, and made him rise above his beastly nature. He became a renowned teacher who mentored many of the greatest heroes of myth including the Argonauts Jason and Peleus, the physician Asklepios, and Achilles of Troy.
GB93825. Bronze AE 23, SNG Cop 636; BMC Pontus p. 211 and pl. 38, 12; Rec Gen II.3 p. 225, 26; SNGvA 256 var. (monogram); HGC 7 629; SGCV II 7266, VF, dark patina, good centering, scrapes, scratches, and bumps, scattered slight porosity, reverse die wear, small edge cracks, weight 5.491 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 0o, Nikomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, c. 180 - 150 B.C.; obverse head of young Dionysos right, wreathed with ivy; reverse centaur Chiron standing right, playing lyre, his cloak flying behind, ΠY monogram inner right under raised foreleg, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on right, ΠPOYΣIOY downward on left; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $80.00 (65.60)


Ophrynion, Troas, 350 - 300 B.C.

|Troas|, |Ophrynion,| |Troas,| |350| |-| |300| |B.C.|NEW
Hector was the Prince of Troy, the first-born son of King Priam and Queen Hecuba, and heir apparent to his father's throne. For ten years, while the Greeks besieged Troy, he commanded the Trojan army. Hector was the best Trojan warrior and his fighting prowess was admired by Trojan and Greeks alike. When Achilles approached, the Trojan army fled into the city but Hector remained outside the walls and stood his ground. Hector was slain by Achilles who then dragged his body behind his chariot.
GB93828. Bronze AE 12, SNG Cop 456; SNGvA 1559; SNG Munchen 299; BMC Troas p. 75, 4, aVF, attractive multi-colored patina, earthen deposits, some corrosion, tiny edge crack, weight 1.315 g, maximum diameter 11.8 mm, die axis 180o, Ophrynion (near Intepe, Turkey) mint, 350 - 300 B.C.; obverse bearded head of Hector, facing slightly right, wearing triple crested helmet; reverse infant Dionysos kneeling right, holding a bunch of grapes, OΦPY upward behind; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $130.00 (106.60)


Lot of 100 Bronze Ancient Trilobate Arrowheads, Hellenistic - Byzantine, c. 300 B.C. - 1000 A.D.

|Metal| |Arrowheads|, |Lot| |of| |100| |Bronze| |Ancient| |Trilobate| |Arrowheads,| |Hellenistic| |-| |Byzantine,| |c.| |300| |B.C.| |-| |1000| |A.D.|NEW
 
LT96893. Lot of 100 bronze trilobate arrowheads, mostly or all Hellenistic - Byzantine, c. 300 B.C. - 1000 A.D., c. 12 - 28 mm, some complete and intact, some with chips or bends, unattributed to type, no tags, from the same larger lot as the arrowheads in the photograph, as-is, no returns; $450.00 (369.00)


Lot of 100 Bronze Ancient Trilobate Arrowheads, Hellenistic - Byzantine, c. 300 B.C. - 1000 A.D.

|Metal| |Arrowheads|, |Lot| |of| |100| |Bronze| |Ancient| |Trilobate| |Arrowheads,| |Hellenistic| |-| |Byzantine,| |c.| |300| |B.C.| |-| |1000| |A.D.|NEW
 
LT96894. Lot of 100 bronze trilobate arrowheads, mostly or all Hellenistic - Byzantine, c. 300 B.C. - 1000 A.D., c. 12 - 28 mm, some complete and intact, some with chips or bends, unattributed to type, no tags, from the same larger lot as the arrowheads in the photograph, as-is, no returns; $500.00 (410.00)


Lot of 100 Bronze Ancient Trilobate Arrowheads, Hellenistic - Byzantine, c. 300 B.C. - 1000 A.D.

|Metal| |Arrowheads|, |Lot| |of| |100| |Bronze| |Ancient| |Trilobate| |Arrowheads,| |Hellenistic| |-| |Byzantine,| |c.| |300| |B.C.| |-| |1000| |A.D.|NEW
 
LT96895. Lot of 100 bronze trilobate arrowheads, mostly or all Hellenistic - Byzantine, c. 300 B.C. - 1000 A.D., c. 12 - 28 mm, some complete and intact, some with chips or bends, unattributed to type, no tags, from the same larger lot as the arrowheads in the photograph, as-is, no returns; $500.00 (410.00)


Marathos, Phoenicia, 157 - 156 B.C.

|Phoenicia|, |Marathos,| |Phoenicia,| |157| |-| |156| |B.C.|NEW
Marathos (Amrit) was the most northern coastal town in Phoenicia. In 259 B.C. Arados increased her autonomy and dominated a federation of nearby cities including Gabala, Karne, Marathos and Simyra. Thus began the era of Arados, to which the subsequent coins of Marathos are dated. The federation of cities was not completely independent. The Seleukids retained overlordship. This type was issued intermittently from era of Arados year 38 (222 - 221 B.C.) to year 108 (152 - 151 B.C.). Arados destroyed Marathos, c. 145 B.C., but later rebuilt it as a colony.
GF93780. Bronze AE 22, Duyrat Ateliers 134 - 138 var. (controls); SNG Cop 166 var. (same); BMC Phoenicia p. 121, 9 var. (same); Cohen DCA 830/103; HGC 10 193, VF, green patina, small earthen encrustations, weak strike reverse center, weight 8.841 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 0o, Marathos (near Tartus, Syria) mint, 157 - 156 B.C.; obverse veiled bust of Astarte right; reverse Marathos standing left, aphlaston in right hand, left arm resting on column behind, Phoenician year 103 left, Phoenician ethnic (MRT) right, Phoenician control letters he over mem inner left and shin lower right; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $90.00 (73.80)


Dia, Bithynia, 85 - 65 B.C.

|Bithynia|, |Dia,| |Bithynia,| |85| |-| |65| |B.C.|NEW
Mithradates VI Eupator "the Great"expanded his Pontic Kingdom through conquest, which inevitably brought him into conflict with Rome. Mithradates regarded himself as the champion of the Greeks against Rome, however, after three years of war, he was defeated by Pompey the Great.
GB93821. Bronze AE 20, SNG Stancomb 805; SNG BM Black Sea 1560; SNGvA 345; Rec Gen p. 342, 2; HGC 7 453 (S), aVF, green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, weight 6.771 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 0o, Dias mint, under Mithradates VI of Pontos, 85 - 65 B.C.; obverse laureate, bearded head of Zeus right; reverse eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head right, wings open, monogram left, ∆IAΣ below; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare city; $90.00 (73.80)


Kingdom of Bithynia, Prusias II Kynegos, 185 - 149 B.C.

|Kingdom| |of| |Bithynia|, |Kingdom| |of| |Bithynia,| |Prusias| |II| |Kynegos,| |185| |-| |149| |B.C.|NEW
Prusias II, son of Prusias I, inherited his father's name but not his character. He first joined with Eumenes of Pergamon in war against Pontus, but later turned on Pergamon and invaded. He was defeated and Pergamon demanded heavy reparations. Prusias sent his son Nicomedes II to Rome to ask for aid in reducing the payments. When Nicomedes revolted, Prusias II was murdered in the temple of Zeus at Nikomedia.

Chiron was immortal but sacrificed his immortality. Herakles and the centaur Pholus were dining in Pholus' cave when Pholus opened a bottle of sacred wine given to him by Dionysus. The smell attracted other centaurs who attacked to take the wine. Heracles killed many of them using arrows poisoned with Hydra-venom. One of those arrows hit Chiron by mistake. Chiron could not die, but the wound was incurable and caused unbearable pain. Chiron gave up his immortality in exchange for Prometheus' freedom, when suggested by Heracles. Zeus then placed him amongst the stars as the constellation Sagittarius or Centaurus.
GB93822. Bronze AE 23, SNG Cop 640; BMC Pontus p. 210, 8; Rec Gen II.3 p. 225, 26; SNGvA 256 var. (monogram); HGC 7 629; SGCV II 7266, F, brown patina, well centered, corrosion, rough, flan adjustment marks, flan crack, weight 6.157 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 0o, Nikomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, c. 180 - 150 B.C.; obverse head of young Dionysos right, wreathed with ivy; reverse centaur Chiron standing right, playing lyre, his cloak flying behind, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on right, ΠPOUΣIOY downward on left, NΦ monogram inner right under raised foreleg; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $60.00 (49.20)




  







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