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Sep 07, 2018

Sep 04, 2018
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Recent Additions

Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Italica, Hispania Baetica

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Italica, Hispania Baetica was the birthplace of Trajan and Hadrian. The native Iberian town of Turdetani was refounded in 206 B.C. as Italica by Scipio Africanus to settle his victorious veterans from the Second Punic War and to control the area. The name reflected the veterans' Italian origins. Italica thrived, especially under Hadrian, who favored his birthplace. Hadrian expanded the city and elevated it to the status of colonia as Colonia Aelia Augusta Italica. He also added temples, including the enormous and unique Trajaneum in the center of the city to venerate his predecessor and adopted father, and rebuilt public buildings. The city started to dwindle as early as the 3rd century; a shift of the Guadalquivir River bed, probably due to silting, a widespread problem in antiquity that followed removal of the forest cover, left Italica's river port high and dry whilst Hispalis continued to grow nearby. The city may have been the birthplace of the emperor Theodosius I. Italica was important enough in late Antiquity to have a bishop of its own. The modern town of Santiponce overlies the pre-Roman Iberian settlement and part of the well-preserved Roman city.
RP85963. Bronze as, RPC I 65, Villaronga-Benages 3333, Burgos 1592, SNG Cop 417, aF, porous, tight flan, weight 27.6 g, maximum diameter 11.957 mm, die axis 270o, Italica (Santiponce, Spain) mint, 14 - 37 A.D.; obverse TI CAESAR AVGVSTVS PONT MAX IMP, bare head right; reverse MVNIC ITALIC PERM DIVI AVG, altar inscribed PROVIDE/NTIAE / AVGVSTI in three lines; $80.00 (68.00)


Vietnam, The Nguyen Emperors, Nguyen Canh Tong, 1885 - 1888 A.D.

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The Nguyen Dynasty was the last ruling family of Vietnam. Their rule lasted a total of 143 years. It began in 1802, when Emperor Gia Long ascended the throne after defeating the Tay Son dynasty, and ended in 1945, when Emperor Bao Dai abdicated the throne and transferred power to the Democratic Republic of Vietnam. Nguyen Canh Tong was the 9th emperor of the Nguyen dynasty and was placed on the throne by the French. He was obedient to the French and died after two years on the throne.
VN86934. Copper cash, Barker 106.5, F, flan crack, light earthen deposits, light encrustations, weight 2.275 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 0o, 1885 - 1888 A.D.; obverse Dong Khanh thong bao; reverse plain; $5.00 (4.25)


Kingdom of Vietnam, The Nguyen Emperors, Nguyen Duy Tan, 1907 - 1916 A.D.

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The Nguyen Dynasty was the last ruling family of Vietnam. Their rule lasted a total of 143 years. It began in 1802, when Emperor Gia Long ascended the throne after defeating the Ty Son dynasty, and ended in 1945, when Emperor Bao Dai abdicated the throne and transferred power to the Democratic Republic of Vietnam. Nguyen Duy Tan was the 11th emperor of the Nguyen dynasty. He was placed on the throne by the French when he was 8 years old. He was intelligent and became a nationalist with his resentment of the French occupation. A planned uprising was reported to the French and he was deposed and exiled to an African island.
VN86937. Bronze Cash (10 Phan), Barker 108.1, Novak 308, Lecompte 24, aVF, brassy alloy, areas of reddish toning, some porosity, weight 3.944 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 0o, 1907 - 1916 A.D.; obverse Duy Tan thong bao; reverse Van Shi (10,000 or 10 Van, basic currency unit); $16.00 (13.60)


Kingdom of Vietnam, The Nguyen Emperors, Nguyen Duc Tong, 1848-1883 A.D.

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The Nguyen Dynasty was the last ruling family of Vietnam. Their rule lasted a total of 143 years. It began in 1802, when Emperor Gia Long ascended the throne after defeating the Ty Son dynasty, and ended in 1945, when Emperor Bao Dai abdicated the throne and transferred power to the Democratic Republic of Vietnam. Duc Tong was the 4th Nguyen emperor, ruled for 36 years, until his death, adopting the reign title of Tu Duc. He was highly educated, cultured and a renowned poet. During his reign, the over-powering French caused great loss, losing many southern provinces in compromising concessions.
VN86938. Copper cash, Barker 103.5, F, light patina, dusting of chalky deposits, porous, weight 2.099 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 0o, 1848 - 1883 A.D.; obverse Tu Duc Thong Bao; reverse Luc Van (10,000 or 6 Van, basic currency unit); $5.00 (4.25)


Dai Viet (Vietnam), Tran Dynasty, Emperor Tran Thai Tong, 1225 - 1258

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Thai Tong was so troubled by domestic affairs that he ran away from the palace and took refuge in a pagoda, for a time refusing to reign. Learned in both Confucianism and Buddhism, he authored several profound works on Buddhism, the most famous of which is Khoa Hu Luc (Instructions on Emptiness), a Zen manual. A prodigious writer, he left behind a substantial number of works, of which only a small number survive. When the Mongols invaded in 1258, he decided not to protect his capital, but instead, with the help of his military commanders, opted for small battles and guerrilla warfare. His strategy forced the Mongols to retreat but he ultimately had to agree to pay a triennial tribute to China, which continued into modern times. Again, tired of the throne, Thai Tong abdicated in 1258 in favor of his son Thanh Tong. Small coins were issued by Thai Tong in his third reign.
VN83973. Bronze cash, Toda 17, cf. Barker 13.1 - 13.2 (seal script), aVF, dusty light green highlighting deposits, round hole, weight 1.518 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, c. 1251 - 1258; obverse Nguyen Phong Thong Bao, nguyen in running hand style; reverse plain, no rim, round hole; $10.00 (8.50)


Dai Viet (northern Vietnam), The Mac Dynasty, c. 1540 - 1590 A.D.

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In A Guide to Cash Coins, pages 142 - 143, David Hartill provides convincing evidence attributing this type to the Mac in the north, cast from c. 1540 - 1590.
VN83975. Bronze cash, Hartill Cash, small copper, distinct calligraphy group 1 (An Phap Type), 2.822; cf. Toda 17 (running script nguyen), Barker 13.1 - 13.2 (larger), aVF, dark patina, chalky highlighting deposit dusting, weight 1.245 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, 1225 - 1258; obverse Nguyen Phong Thong Bao, in seal script; reverse plain, no rim; $18.00 (15.30)


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Perinthus, Thrace

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In 46 A.D., after the death of the Thracian king Rhoemetalces III and after an unsuccessful anti-Roman revolt, the Thracian Kingdom was annexed by Claudius as the Roman province of Thracia. Perinthus was made the capital of Roman Thracia. Although the denomination is uncertain, RPC I suggests it is a sestertius.
RP87197. Brass provincial sestertius, Schnert Perinthos 233 - 235; RPC I 1754; Varbanov III 20 (R4); Muschmov 4421; BMC Thrace p. 148, 13 var. (obv. leg.); SNG Cop -, F, dark patina, some porosity, central dimples, weight 20.839 g, maximum diameter 33.2 mm, die axis 0o, Heraclea Perinthos (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 63 - 9 Jun 68 A.D.; obverse NEPΩN KΛAY∆IOΣ KAIΣAP ΣEBAΣTOΣ, laureate head left; reverse ΠEPIN/ΘIΩN in two lines within oak wreath tied at the bottom; $240.00 (204.00)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.; EQVITI Series II of Ticinum, Q XXI

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Ticinum mint EQVITI series II - click "EQVITI" to read the NumisWiki article, "Coins of Probus with Coded Markings of EQVITI Embedded in the mint mark." The letter "I" in the reverse field is the fourth letter of the codeword EQVITI. The letter "Q" in the exergue indicates this coin was struck by the fourth officina (mint workshop). The letters of the word EQVITI are coded in the mint marks of coins from all the officinae of the mint, with the specific letters of the codeword assigned to each officina in order corresponding with their officina numbers. This codeword probably refers to cavalry. It may be AEQVITI truncated because there were only six officinae in operation.
RA87271. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 508; Hunter IV 148; Pink VI-1, p. 56; Cohen VI 352; SRCV III -; Hunter IV 148; Pink VI-1, p. 56; Cohen VI 352; SRCV III -, gVF, well centered on a broad oval flan, much silvering remains, weight 3.739 g, maximum diameter 24.5 mm, die axis 0o, 4th officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, 280 A.D.; obverse IMP C PROBVS AVG, radiate mantled bust left, eagle-tipped scepter in right; reverse MARTI PACIF (to Mars the peacemaker), Mars advancing left, holding olive-branch, shield and spear, I left, QXXI in exergue; $80.00 (68.00)


Viet Nam, Nguyen Dynasty, Nguyen The To (Gia Long), 1 June 1802 - 3 February 1820

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A nephew of the last Nguyen lord who ruled southern Vietnam, at age 15, Emperor Gia Long, temple name Nguyen The To, (full name Nguyen Phuc Anh) was forced into hiding when his family was slain in the Tay Son revolt. After several changes of fortune in which his loyalists regained and again lost Saigon, he befriended the French Catholic priest Pigneau de Behaine. Pigneau recruited volunteers to help him take the throne. From 1789, he advanced north, defeating the Tay Son, reaching the Chinese border 1802, and reuniting all Vietnam, from China down to the Gulf of Siam, after centuries of feudal warfare. He took the regnal name Gia Long, moved the capital from Hanoi to Hue, and reinstated Confucian education and civil service. In return for French support, he tolerated Catholic missionaries, which was increasingly restricted under his successors. Using French expertise, he modernized Vietnam's military, gained dominance in Indochina, and made Cambodia into a vassal state.Gia Long

VN87486. Bronze Cash (1 Phan), Barker 99.3, Toda 213, Krause KM169, Schroeder 113, F, brassy alloy, minor encrustations, weight 2.215 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, 1802 - 1819 A.D.; obverse Gia Long Thong Bao; reverse blank; $4.00 (3.40)


Viet Nam, Nguyen Dynasty, Nguyen The To (Gia Long), 1 June 1802 - 3 February 1820

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A nephew of the last Nguyen lord who ruled southern Vietnam, at age 15, Emperor Gia Long, temple name Nguyen The To, (full name Nguyen Phuc Anh) was forced into hiding when his family was slain in the Tay Son revolt. After several changes of fortune in which his loyalists regained and again lost Saigon, he befriended the French Catholic priest Pigneau de Behaine. Pigneau recruited volunteers to help him take the throne. From 1789, he advanced north, defeating the Tay Son, reaching the Chinese border 1802, and reuniting all Vietnam, from China down to the Gulf of Siam, after centuries of feudal warfare. He took the regnal name Gia Long, moved the capital from Hanoi to Hue, and reinstated Confucian education and civil service. In return for French support, he tolerated Catholic missionaries, which was increasingly restricted under his successors. Using French expertise, he modernized Vietnam's military, gained dominance in Indochina, and made Cambodia into a vassal state.Gia Long

VN87487. Bronze Cash (1 Phan), Barker 99.3, Toda 213, Krause KM169, Schroeder 113, F, highlighting deposits and encrustations, weight 1.938 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, 1802 - 1819 A.D.; obverse Gia Long Thong Bao; reverse blank; $5.00 (4.25)




  







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