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Recent Additions

China, Ming Dynasty, Emperor Tai Zu, 1368 - 1398 A.D.

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In the middle of the 14th century, with famine, plagues, and peasant revolts sweeping across China, Zhu Yuanzhang rose to command the force that conquered China and ended the Mongol-led Yuan dynasty, forcing the Mongols to retreat to the Central Asian steppes. Zhu claimed the Mandate of Heaven and established the Ming dynasty at the beginning of 1368 and took on the Temple name of Tai Zu, known as the Hongwu Emperor.
CH83954. Bronze 1 cash, Hartill 20.72, Schjoth 1145, Fisher 1900, F, encrustations, casting flaw hole, weight 3.344 g, maximum diameter 24.7 mm, Zhejiang province mint, 1368 - 1398 A.D.; obverse Hong Wu tong bao, cross wise, one dot tong; reverse Zhe above; $8.00 (€6.80)


China, Ming Dynasty, Emperor Tai Zu, 1368 - 1398 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In the middle of the 14th century, with famine, plagues, and peasant revolts sweeping across China, Zhu Yuanzhang rose to command the force that conquered China and ended the Mongol-led Yuan dynasty, forcing the Mongols to retreat to the Central Asian steppes. Zhu claimed the Mandate of Heaven and established the Ming dynasty at the beginning of 1368 and took on the Temple name of Tai Zu, known as the Hongwu Emperor.
CH83956. Bronze 1 cash, Hartill 20.71, Schjoth 1145, Fisher 1900, F, encrustations, weight 2.5818 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, Zhejiang province mint, 1368 - 1398 A.D.; obverse Hong Wu tong bao, cross wise, two dot tong; reverse Zhe above; $8.00 (€6.80)


China, Ming Dynasty, Emperor Tai Zu, 1368 - 1398 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In the middle of the 14th century, with famine, plagues, and peasant revolts sweeping across China, Zhu Yuanzhang rose to command the force that conquered China and ended the Mongol-led Yuan dynasty, forcing the Mongols to retreat to the Central Asian steppes. Zhu claimed the Mandate of Heaven and established the Ming dynasty at the beginning of 1368 and took on the Temple name of Tai Zu, known as the Hongwu Emperor.
CH83957. Bronze 1 cash, Hartill 20.71, Schjoth 1145, Fisher 1900, F, earthen deposits, weight 3.114 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, Zhejiang province mint, 1368 - 1398 A.D.; obverse Hong Wu tong bao, cross wise, two dot tong; reverse Zhe above; $8.00 (€6.80)


China, Ming Dynasty, Emperor Tai Zu, 1368 - 1398 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In the middle of the 14th century, with famine, plagues, and peasant revolts sweeping across China, Zhu Yuanzhang rose to command the force that conquered China and ended the Mongol-led Yuan dynasty, forcing the Mongols to retreat to the Central Asian steppes. Zhu claimed the Mandate of Heaven and established the Ming dynasty at the beginning of 1368 and took on the Temple name of Tai Zu, known as the Hongwu Emperor.
CH83958. Bronze 1 cash, Hartill 20.71, Schjoth 1145, Fisher 1900, aVF, light chalky deposits, weight 3.617 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, Zhejiang province mint, 1368 - 1398 A.D.; obverse Hong Wu tong bao, cross wise, two dot tong; reverse Zhe above; $14.00 (€11.90)


China, Qing Dynasty, Ren Zong, The Jianging Emperor, 1796 - 1820 A.D.

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The Jiaqing Emperor (9 February 1796 – 2 September 1820), personal name Yongyan, was the seventh emperor of the Manchu-led Qing dynasty, and the fifth Qing emperor to rule over China, from 1796 to 1820. He was the 15th son of the Qianlong Emperor. During his reign, he prosecuted Heshen, the corrupt favorite of his father, and attempted to restore order within the Qing Empire and curb the smuggling of opium into China. Nanchang is the capital of Jiangxi Province in southeastern China.
CH83959. Bronze 1 cash, Hartill 22.457, Fisher 2336, Schjoth 1489 var. (same); smaller type, F, dark patina, earthen deposits, weight 3.058 g, maximum diameter 23.3 mm, Peking mint, 1803 - 1815 A.D.; obverse Jia Qing tong bao, cross reading, board of revenue type, type B1 left hand stroke of qing curved, East tong; reverse Boo Chiowan left and right; $7.00 (€5.95)


China, Qing Dynasty, Ren Zong, The Jianging Emperor, 1796 - 1820 A.D.

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The Jiaqing Emperor (9 February 1796 – 2 September 1820), personal name Yongyan, was the seventh emperor of the Manchu-led Qing dynasty, and the fifth Qing emperor to rule over China, from 1796 to 1820. He was the 15th son of the Qianlong Emperor. During his reign, he prosecuted Heshen, the corrupt favorite of his father, and attempted to restore order within the Qing Empire and curb the smuggling of opium into China. Nanchang is the capital of Jiangxi Province in southeastern China.
CH83960. Bronze 1 cash, Hartill 22.466, Fisher 2336, Schjoth 1489 var. (same), F, smaller, dark patina, highlighting encrustations, weight 3.798 g, maximum diameter 23.5 mm, Peking mint, 1803 - 1815 A.D.; obverse Jia Qing tong bao, cross reading, board of revenue type, type C2 left hand stroke of qing straight, South tong; reverse Boo Chiowan left and right; $6.00 (€5.10)


China, Northern Song Dynasty, Emperor Hui Zong, 1101 - 1126 A.D.

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Huizong, one of the most famous Song Dynasty emperors, spent most of his life surrounded by luxury, sophistication, and art, but ended in tragedy. An artist, Huizong neglected the army, and Song China became increasingly weak. On Jan 18, 1126, after the forces of the Jin had crossed the Yellow River and came in sight of the Song capital, Kaifeng, Huizong abdicated in favor of his son Emperor Qinzong. The Jin entered Kaifeng on Jan 9, 1127, and many days of looting, rapes, and massacre followed. Huizong and Qinzong were captured and demoted to commoner. Huizong was deported to northern Manchuria, where he spent the last eight years of his life as a captive.
CH83977. Bronze 10 cash, Hartill 16.407, Schjoth 622, Fisher 1050, VF, dark patina, light earthen deposits, flaw on left edge of hole, weight 9.846 g, maximum diameter 34.1 mm, 1102 - 1106 A.D.; obverse Chong Ning zhong bao (coinage of greater reverence), li script, large characters; reverse plain; $22.00 (€18.70)


China, Northern Song Dynasty, Emperor Hui Zong, 1101 - 1126 A.D.

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Huizong, one of the most famous Song Dynasty emperors, spent most of his life surrounded by luxury, sophistication, and art, but ended in tragedy. An artist, Huizong neglected the army, and Song China became increasingly weak. On Jan 18, 1126, after the forces of the Jin had crossed the Yellow River and came in sight of the Song capital, Kaifeng, Huizong abdicated in favor of his son Emperor Qinzong. The Jin entered Kaifeng on Jan 9, 1127, and many days of looting, rapes, and massacre followed. Huizong and Qinzong were captured and demoted to commoner. Huizong was deported to northern Manchuria, where he spent the last eight years of his life as a captive.
CH83978. Bronze 10 cash, Hartill 16.407, Schjoth 622, Fisher 1050, aVF, earthen encrustations, weight 9.752 g, maximum diameter 33.5 mm, 1102 - 1106 A.D.; obverse Chong Ning zhong bao (coinage of greater reverence), li script, large characters; reverse plain; $22.00 (€18.70)


China, Northern Song Dynasty, Emperor Hui Zong, 1101 - 1126 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Huizong, one of the most famous Song Dynasty emperors, spent most of his life surrounded by luxury, sophistication, and art, but ended in tragedy. An artist, Huizong neglected the army, and Song China became increasingly weak. On Jan 18, 1126, after the forces of the Jin had crossed the Yellow River and came in sight of the Song capital, Kaifeng, Huizong abdicated in favor of his son Emperor Qinzong. The Jin entered Kaifeng on Jan 9, 1127, and many days of looting, rapes, and massacre followed. Huizong and Qinzong were captured and demoted to commoner. Huizong was deported to northern Manchuria, where he spent the last eight years of his life as a captive.
CH83979. Bronze 10 cash, Hartill 16.407, Schjoth 622, Fisher 1050, aVF, dark green patina, light earthen deposits, weight 11.075 g, maximum diameter 34.5 mm, 1102 - 1106 A.D.; obverse Chong Ning zhong bao (coinage of greater reverence), li script, large characters; reverse plain; $20.00 (€17.00)


China, Northern Song Dynasty, Emperor Hui Zong, 1101 - 1126 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Huizong, one of the most famous Song Dynasty emperors, spent most of his life surrounded by luxury, sophistication, and art, but ended in tragedy. An artist, Huizong neglected the army, and Song China became increasingly weak. On Jan 18, 1126, after the forces of the Jin had crossed the Yellow River and came in sight of the Song capital, Kaifeng, Huizong abdicated in favor of his son Emperor Qinzong. The Jin entered Kaifeng on Jan 9, 1127, and many days of looting, rapes, and massacre followed. Huizong and Qinzong were captured and demoted to commoner. Huizong was deported to northern Manchuria, where he spent the last eight years of his life as a captive.
CH83981. Bronze 5 cash, Hartill 16.406, Schjoth 622, Fisher 1050, VF, weight 5.478 g, maximum diameter 30.9 mm, 1102 A.D.; obverse Chong Ning zhong bao (coinage of greater reverence), li script, smaller size; reverse plain; $25.00 (€21.25)




  







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