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Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Ascalon, Philistia, Judaea

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.,| |Ascalon,| |Philistia,| |Judaea|NEW
The Philistines conquered Canaanite Ashkelon about 1150 B.C. and it became one of the five Philistine cities that were constantly warring with the Israelites and the Kingdom of Judah. The last of the Philistine cities to hold out against Nebuchadnezzar, it finally fell in 604 B.C.; burned and destroyed, its people exiled, the Philistine era ended. Ashkelon was rebuilt, dominated by Persian culture. After the Alexander's conquest, Ashkelon was an important Hellenistic seaport. The Jews drove the Greeks out of the region during the Maccabean Revolt, which lasted from 167 to 160 B.C. In 63 B.C. the area was incorporated into the Roman Republic. Cleopatra VII used Ashkelon as her refuge when her brother and sister exiled her in 49 B.C. The city remained loyal to Rome during the First Jewish Revolt.
RY110574. Bronze AE 22, cf. Yashin 200 - 202; RPC IV.3 T10145/2 (2 spec., one with this bust); Rosenberger I 169; BMC Palestine -, Sofaer -, aF, well centered, red-brown patina, weight 11.076 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 0o, Askalon (Ashqelon, Israel) mint, 141 - 142 A.D.; obverse CEBA(?), laureate draped, and cuirassed bust right, short beard; reverse ACKAΛW, Tyche-Astarte standing slightly left on galley, turreted head left, standard in right hand, apluster in left hand, incense altar over E left, dove standing left over EMC (year 245) on right; Coin Archives records only one specimen of the type at auction in the last two decades; extremely rare; $180.00 SALE PRICE $162.00


Iberian Celts, Lot of 10 Hacksilver Fragments, c. 300 - 150 B.C.

|Hacksilver|, |Iberian| |Celts,| |Lot| |of| |10| |Hacksilver| |Fragments,| |c.| |300| |-| |150| |B.C.|NEW
Hacksilver or hacksilber, are fragments of cut and bent silver items treated as bullion, either for ease of carrying before melting down for re-use, or simply used as currency by weight. It was common in trade until the first century B.C. and again in the middle ages with the Vikings.
GA110589. Hacksilver Lot, cf. Garcia-Bellido 393, Kim and Kroll 66; Van Alfen Hacksilber 85; weights range from 0.698g - 3.960g, $320.00 SALE PRICE $288.00


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Ascalon, Philistia, Judaea

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Ascalon,| |Philistia,| |Judaea|NEW
The Philistines conquered Canaanite Ashkelon about 1150 B.C. and it became one of the five Philistine cities that were constantly warring with the Israelites and the Kingdom of Judah. The last of the Philistine cities to hold out against Nebuchadnezzar, it finally fell in 604 B.C.; burned and destroyed, its people exiled, the Philistine era ended. Ashkelon was rebuilt, dominated by Persian culture. After the Alexander's conquest, Ashkelon was an important Hellenistic seaport. The Jews drove the Greeks out of the region during the Maccabean Revolt, which lasted from 167 to 160 B.C. In 63 B.C. the area was incorporated into the Roman Republic. Cleopatra VII used Ashkelon as her refuge when her brother and sister exiled her in 49 B.C. The city remained loyal to Rome during the First Jewish Revolt.
RP110556. Bronze AE 18, RPC Online II 2213; Sofaer 82; Rosenberger 116; BMC Palestine p. 122, 129; SNG ANS -, aVF, bare toned metal, reverse a little off center, weight 5.763 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, Askalon (Ashqelon, Israel) mint, 85 - 86 A.D.; obverse laureate head left, CE (caesar) downward on left; reverse Phanebal (war god of Ascalon) standing facing, wearing military dress, raising sword above head in right hand, shield and palm frond in left hand, ΘΠP (year 189 of the Ascalon Era) downward on left, AC (Ascalon) upward on right; rare; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Persian Empire, Sidon, Phoenicia, c. 401 - 333 B.C.

|Phoenicia|, |Persian| |Empire,| |Sidon,| |Phoenicia,| |c.| |401| |-| |333| |B.C.|NEW
Sidon, named for the "first-born" of Canaan, the grandson of Noah (Genesis 10:15, 19), is frequently referred to by the prophets (Isaiah 23:2, 4, 12; Jeremiah 25:22; 27:3; 47:4; Ezekiel 27:8; 28:21, 22; 32:30; Joel 3:4). The Sidonians long oppressed Israel (Judges 10:12) but Solomon entered into a matrimonial alliance with them, and thus their form of idolatrous worship found a place in the land of Israel (1 Kings 11:1, 33). Jesus visited the "coasts" of Tyre and Sidon (Matthew 15:21; Mark 7:24) where many came to hear him preach (Mark 3:8; Luke 6:17). After leaving Caesarea, Paul's ship put in at Sidon, before finally sailing for Rome (Acts 27:3, 4).
GA110565. Silver 1/16 shekel, Elayi 2004 851 ff.; HGC 10 240; Betlyon 27 (Abd'astart, Straton I); BMC Phoenicia p 146, 36 (same); SNG Cop 197 ff. (same), aF, toned, weight 0.719 g, maximum diameter 10.0 mm, die axis 0o, Sidon (Saida, Lebanon) mint, c. 401 - 333 B.C.; obverse war galley left, Phoenician letter above; reverse King of Persia (to left) standing right, slaying erect lion to right, Phoenician letter between them; $60.00 SALE PRICE $54.00


Apameia, Phrygia, c. 88 - 40 B.C.

|Apameia|, |Apameia,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |88| |-| |40| |B.C.|NEW
While playing the flute Athena saw her reflection in the water and disturbed by how her cheeks looked, puffed up while playing, threw away the instrument in disgust. The satyr Marsyas picked up the flute and since it had once been inspired by the breath of a goddess, it played beautifully on its own accord. Elated by his success, Marsyas challenged Apollo to a musical contest. For the prize, the victor could do what he pleased with the vanquished. The Muses were the umpires. Apollo played the cithara and Marsyas the flute. Only after Apollo added his voice to the music of his lyre was the contest decided in his favor. As a just punishment for the presumption of Marsyas, Apollo bound him to an evergreen tree and flayed him alive. His blood was the source of the river Marsyas, and Apollo hung up his skin, like a wine bag, in the cave out of which that river flows.
GB110567. Bronze AE 16, BMC Phrygia p. 77, 47; SNG Cop 191; SNGvA 3472; SNG Tbingen 3973; HGC 7 674; SNG Munchen -, F, tight flan, weight 3.469 g, maximum diameter 16.2 mm, die axis 0o, Phrygia, Apameia (Dinar, Turkey) mint, c. 88 - 40 B.C.; obverse turreted head of Artemis right, bow and quiver on shoulder behind; reverse satyr Marsyas walking right on a meander pattern, nude but for nebris (skin of a fawn) tied on his neck and flying behind, playing Athena's double flute, AΠAMEΩN downward on right, APIΣT / KHΦIΣ (Aristo... and Kephis...) magistrates' names in two downward lines on left; $50.00 SALE PRICE $45.00


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D.

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.|NEW
The Nilometer measured the height of the annual Nile flood. Sixteen cubits was considered the ideal height of the annual Nile flood. Less could mean drought or famine. Even in modern times, grand celebrations were held when the flood reached 16 cubits. In years when the flood failed to reach 16 cubits, the celebrations were canceled, and prayers and fasting were held instead. The peak flood occurred at the end of August, which explains why the Egyptian year began on 29 August.
RX110549. Bronze drachm, RPC Online III 4837 (6 spec.), Dattari 992, Kampmann-Ganschow 27.602, Geissen 677 var. (laureate, draped and cuirassed), F, well centered, part of obv. legend weak/unstruck, weight 14.271 g, maximum diameter 32.9 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 114 - 28 Aug 115 A.D.; obverse AYT TPAIAN CEB ΓEPM ∆AKIK (Imperator Traianus Augustus Germanicus Dacicus), laureate half-length nude bust of Trajan right, chest bare, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse Nilus reclining left on hippopotamus, trunk bare, himation around hips and legs and over left arm, reed in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, genius standing by nilometer in background on left on far side of legs, LIH (year 18) in exergue; $180.00 SALE PRICE $162.00


Tyre, Phoenicia, 104 - 105 A.D.

|Phoenicia|, |Tyre,| |Phoenicia,| |104| |-| |105| |A.D.|NEW
Astarte, called "Ashtroth" in Scripture, was the favorite goddess of the Sidonians, Tyrians, Philistines, and Syro-Phoenicians generally. She was associated with the Greek Aphrodite and Roman Venus Genetrix, being believed by the ancients to be the goddess of generation, as well as of beauty. Astarte was chiefly worshiped and appears on the coins of Berytus, Bostra, Sidon, and Tyre. Her image is of a young woman, wearing a tall headdress; and clothed in a tunic, high in the neck- sometimes, not reaching lower than the knees, or sometimes with a longer dress, but with one knee exposed, and one foot planted on a galley's prow.
RP110571. Bronze AE 12, RPC Online III 3883; Rouvier 2251; BMC Phoenicia p. 260, 305; SNG Cop 356; Baramki AUB 169, VF, black patina, reverse off center, porosity, light corrosion, weight 1.768 g, maximum diameter 12.3 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre (Lebanon) mint, 104 - 105 A.D.; obverse turreted and veiled head of Tyche right, palm frond behind; reverse Astarte standing left on galley left, turreted, wreath in right hand, transverse cruciform scepter in left, volute on prow, aphlaston at stern, ΛΣ (year 230) above galley left, (metropolis Tyre monogram) above galley right, Phoenician inscription "of Tyre" in exergue; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Judean Kingdom, Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 104 - 76 B.C.

|Alexander| |Jannaeus|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |Jannaeus| |(Yehonatan),| |104| |-| |76| |B.C.|NEW
Lead tesserae (tokens) were issued by the monarch to the poor to be redeemed for food and other commodities. Meshorer reports the lead tesserae of Alexander Jannaeus are found almost exclusively in Transjordan
JD110536. Lead tessera, Hendin 6192 (S), Meshorer TJC M, Meshorer AJC D, HGC 10 645, aF, heavy example, weight 5.154 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, Transjordan mint, 95 - 76 B.C.; obverse Aramaic inscription: King Alexander Year 25, anchor (upside-down as if hanging on the side of a boat) inside circle; reverse traces of Aramaic inscription, King Alexander, with a border of dots; very scarce; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Attaea, Mysia

|Other| |Mysia|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Attaea,| |Mysia|NEW
Attaea appears to be known only from its coinage. Its site is uncertain but, based on coin finds, may be Dikeliky, Turkey.
RP110211. Bronze AE 26, SNG BnF 154; SNGvA 1083; BMC Mysia p. 17, 12; AMNG IV 407; SNG Cop -, F, near centered, dark green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, mild porosity, weight 10.071 g, maximum diameter 26.4 mm, die axis 0o, Attaea (Dikeliky, Turkey?) mint, 28 Jan 198 - 8 Apr 217 A.D.; obverse AYT KAI M AYP ANTΩNEINOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse CTP POY AN∆PONOC ATTAITΩN, Youthful male figure on left, standing right, nude, left foot resting on large rock, both arms resting on left knee, bearded male figure (Zeus or Demos), on right, standing facing, wearing himation, left hand reaching toward youth, long scepter vertical in left hand; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Prymnessos, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Nero,| |13| |October| |54| |-| |9| |June| |68| |A.D.,| |Prymnessos,| |Phrygia|NEW
Prymnessos in central Phrygia on a junction of important trading-routes between Synnada and Docimaeum. Today it is Sln, Turkey.
RP110213. Bronze AE 21, RPC Online I 3207 (14 spec.), vA Phryg. II 102231, SNGvA 2308, Nice aVF, green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, light marks, weight 6.718 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 0o, Prymnessos (near Sln, Turkey) mint, 63 - 68 A.D.; obverse NEPΩNA KAIΣAPA ΠPYMNHΣΣEIΣ (counterclockwise from lower right), laureate head right; reverse EΠI TI IOYΛIOY ΠPOKΛOY (struck under Ti. Ioulios Proklos [magistrate], clockwise from upper right), Dikaiosyne standing left, scales in right hand, two ears of grain in left hand; this is the first specimen of this type handled by FORVM, Coin Archives records only one specimen of the type at auction in the last two decades; rare; $170.00 SALE PRICE $153.00




  







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