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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Greece| ▸ |Other Greece||View Options:  |  |  |   

Other or Uncertain Greece

Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus or Antigonus II Gonatus, 306 - 270 B.C.

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Unpublished in the standard references and not yet fully attributed, this is only the second specimen of this extremely rare and important drachm known to Forum. Both specimens were struck with the same reverse die. Gorny & Mosch wrote of their specimen: "Troxell recorded a very rare issue of Alexandrine tetradrachms in the name of Gonatas (The Peloponnesian Alexanders, ANSMN 17, 1971, 75-6, note 68), which through hoard evidence was conclusively proven to be struck at Pella circa 272 (see R. W. Mathisen, Antigonus Gonatas and the Silver Coinages of Macedon circa 280-270 BC, ANSMN 26, 1981, pp. 79-123, esp. p. 104). However, this unique drachm has no controls that would explicitly tie it to the Pella mint tetradrachms, and even more perplexing is the style of the engraving, which is clearly dissimilar to the tetradrachms as well. One might suppose that it is in fact not a coin of Gonatas at all, but rather a hitherto unknown drachm of his grandfather, Antigonos I Monophthalmos. However, this also does not sit well, again for reasons of style, which is inconsistent with the period of Monophthalmos' reign. For the time being, therefore, this coin must remain a numismatic enigma until further evidence can shed additional light on it."

There are two auction records for the Gorny & Mosch specimen: Roma Numismatics auction 7 (22 Mar 2014), lot 454, sold for £ 4,800 plus fees; and Gorny & Mosch auction 203 (5 Mar 2012), lot 150, sold for € 3,200 plus fees. Our coin sold at Gitbud & Naumann auction 16, (4 May 2014), lot 152, apparently slipping through unnoticed by all but our astute consignor for € 575 plus fees.
SH71048. Silver drachm, unpublished in standard refs; cf. Roma Numismatics auction 7, lot 454 (same rev die) = Gorny & Mosch auction 203, lot 150, VF, reverse struck a bit flat, weight 3.845 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Greece or Macedonia mint, 306 - 270 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIΓONOY, Zeus Aetophoros enthroned left, throne with high back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back; ex Gitbud & Naumann auction 16, lot 152; extremely rare, only two know specimens; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Kassander - Antigonos II Gonatas, c. 310 - 275 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Born a leader, Alexander the Great's genius and charisma led the Macedonian army to create an empire covering most of the then-known world, from Greece to India. His reign begins the Hellenistic Age, a time when civilization flourished. He was regarded as a god and his fame grew even greater after his premature death at thirty-two.
GS52072. Silver drachm, Price 862, SNG Cop 975, SNG München 397, SNG Alpha Bank 565, Meydancikkale 522 ff., Müller Alexander 283 var. (throne with high back), aVF, porous, weight 4.037 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Greece or Macedonia mint, c. 310 - 275 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on throne throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, apluster in left field; SOLD


Aetolian League, Aetolia, Greece, c. 205 - 150 B.C.

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The Aetolian League was a confederation of tribal communities and cities centered in central Greece, probably established to oppose Macedon and the Achaean League. Other Greeks considered Aetolians to be semi-barbaric, but their league had an effective political and administrative structure and a powerful army. By the end of the 3rd century B.C., it controlled the whole of central Greece outside Attica. At its height, the league included Locris, Malis, Dolopes, part of Thessaly, Phocis, and Acarnania. Some Mediterranean city-states, such as Kydonia on Crete, joined. As the first Greek ally of the Roman Republic, the league helped defeat Philip V of Macedon. Roman meddling in Greek affairs shifted opinion and a few years later the league sided with Antiochus III, the anti-Roman Seleucid king. Antiochus' defeat in 189 B.C. forced the league to sign a treaty that allowed it to exist but made it an feeble pawn of the Roman Republic.
GS32219. Silver triobol, Tsangari 1153, aVF, toned, weight 2.326 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 135o, Aitolian mint, obverse head of Aetolia right, wearing kausia; reverse AITΩΛΩN, the Calydonian boar standing right, monogram below, spearhead in ex; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Kassander - Antigonos II Gonatas, c. 310 - 275 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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When Antipater transferred the regency of Macedon to Polyperchon, Kassander rejected his father's decision, obtained support from Antigonus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, defeated Polyperchon, and in 317 B.C. declared himself Regent. After Olympias had Philip III assassinated later that year, Kassander besieged her in Pydna. The city fell two years later, Olympias was killed, and Alexander IV and Roxanne were imprisoned. To associate himself with the Argead dynasty Kassander married Alexander's half-sister, Thessalonica. About 310 B.C. he had Alexander IV and Roxanne poisoned. Kassander proclaimed himself King in 305 B.C. After Antigonus was killed at the Battle of Ipsus in 301 B.C., Kassander held undisputed rule of Macedonia. He had little time to savor the fact, dying of dropsy in 297 B.C.
GS75270. Silver drachm, Price 862A, Müller Alexander 283, SNG Cop 976, Meydancikkale 520, SNG München 397 var. (throne with no back), SNG Alpha Bank 565 var. (same), VF, fine style, dark toning, obverse slightly off-center, light marks and scratches, weight 4.174 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Greece or Macedonia mint, c. 310 - 275 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on throne with high back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, apluster in left field; SOLD


Uncertain (Ionia or Aegean Islands?), c. 550 - 450 B.C.

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We received this coin attributed to Kythnos, Cyclades Islands, Greece, but neither the boar's head nor the incuse punch share the same style with specimens from Kythnos known to Forum. The origin of this coin is uncertain. If it is a great rarity of high value, please let us know so we can raise the price before you buy it (just kidding, go ahead, buy it).
GA86886. Silver tetartemorion, VF, centered, toned, porous, weight 0.153 g, maximum diameter 5.2 mm, uncertain mint, c. 550 - 450 B.C.; obverse boar head right; reverse incuse square; very rare; SOLD


Aetolian League, Aetolia, Greece, 205 - 150 B.C.

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The Aetolian League was a confederation of tribal communities and cities centered in central Greece, probably established to oppose Macedon and the Achaean League. Other Greeks considered Aetolians to be semi-barbaric, but their league had an effective political and administrative structure and a powerful army. By the end of the 3rd century B.C., it controlled the whole of central Greece outside Attica. At its height, the league included Locris, Malis, Dolopes, part of Thessaly, Phocis, and Acarnania. Some Mediterranean city-states, such as Kydonia on Crete, joined. As the first Greek ally of the Roman Republic, the league helped defeat Philip V of Macedon. Roman meddling in Greek affairs shifted opinion and a few years later the league sided with Antiochus III, the anti-Roman Seleucid king. Antiochus' defeat in 189 B.C. forced the league to sign a treaty that allowed it to exist but made it an feeble pawn of the Roman Republic.
GB82444. Bronze hemiobol, BCD Akarnania 572, Tsangari 1527a; SGCV I 2323, VF, weight 5.595 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 0o, Aetolian mint, 205 - 150 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing a crested Corinthian helmet; reverse Herakles standing facing, leaning on club in right hand, with lion's skin draped over left arm, N over I between leg and club, AITΩ/ΛΩN in two downward lines starting on the right; SOLD


Stratos, Acarnania, Greece, c. 432 - 400 B.C.

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Stratos was the main town of Acarnania. Its situation at the northern edge of the fertile Acheloos plain made it a place of great military importance. The ruins of ancient Stratos lie on a hillside about 500 meters north of the modern village. A temple of Zeus, a theater and fortifications have been excavated.
GA90656. Silver trihemiobol, SNG Cop 406; BCD Akarnania 4; Imhoof-Blumer Akarnaniens p. 146, 7; Traité II p. 4, 16, pl. CCLXXI, 17; BMC Thessaly -, Fair, weight 0.842 g, maximum diameter 11.0 mm, die axis 0o, Stratos mint, c. 432 - 400 B.C.; obverse head of river-god Acheloos right; reverse T (mark of value) within incuse square; rare; SOLD


Salamis, Islands off Attica, Greece, 4th century B.C.

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Salamis is the largest Greek island in the Saronic Gulf, about 2 km off-coast from Piraeus and about 16 km west of Athens. Some say it was named after the nymph Salamis, according to legend the mother of Cychreus, the first king of the island. Another theory, considers "Salamis" to come from the root Sal- (meaning salty water) and -amis (meaning the middle); thus Salamis would be (the place) amid salt water. Salamis was probably first colonized by Aegina and later occupied by Megara, but became an Athenian possession in the time of Solon or Peisistratos, following the war between Athens and Megara around 600 B.C. According to Homer's Iliad, Salamis took part in the Trojan War with twelve ships under the leadership of Ajax. Salamis island is known for the Battle of Salamis, the decisive naval victory of the allied Greek fleet, led by Themistocles, over the Persian Empire in 480 B.C. It is said to be the birthplace of Ajax and Euripides; the latter's birth being popularly placed on the day of the battle.
GB76810. Bronze AE 16, SNG Cop 455; Kroll p. 214, 640; BMC Attica p. 116, 1, VF, rough corrosion, weight 2.787 g, maximum diameter 16.4 mm, die axis 180o, Salamis mint, 4th century B.C.; obverse head of nymph Salamis right, wearing stephanos; reverse ΣA−ΛA, sword of Ajax in sheath, on his Boeotian shield; very rare; SOLD


Korkyra (Corfu), Island off Epirus, Greece, c. 48 B.C. - 138 A.D.

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GB18161. Bronze AE 21, SGICV 4845, BMC p. 155, 591 ff., aVF, weight 4.809 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 0o, Cassiope or Kerkyra mint, c. 48 B.C. - 138 A.D.; obverse AΓPE VC, Agreus stands left within distyle arched temple; reverse ZEVC KACIOC, Zeus Cassius enthroned left, holding scepter; olive green patina; SOLD


Aetolian League, Aetolia, Greece, 205 - 150 B.C.

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The Aetolian League was a confederation of tribal communities and cities centered in central Greece, probably established to oppose Macedon and the Achaean League. Other Greeks considered Aetolians to be semi-barbaric, but their league had an effective political and administrative structure and a powerful army. By the end of the 3rd century B.C., it controlled the whole of central Greece outside Attica. At its height, the league included Locris, Malis, Dolopes, part of Thessaly, Phocis, and Acarnania. Some Mediterranean city-states, such as Kydonia on Crete, joined. As the first Greek ally of the Roman Republic, the league helped defeat Philip V of Macedon. Roman meddling in Greek affairs shifted opinion and a few years later the league sided with Antiochus III, the anti-Roman Seleucid king. Antiochus' defeat in 189 B.C. forced the league to sign a treaty that allowed it to exist but made it an feeble pawn of the Roman Republic.
GB69773. Bronze hemiobol, BCD Akarnania 567, Tsangari 1490, SNG Cop 36; BMC Thessaly p. 199, 64; SGCV I 2323, F, dark green patina, weight 5.264 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 210o, Aetolian mint, 205 - 150 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing a crested Corinthian helmet; reverse Herakles standing facing, head right, leaning on club in right hand, Nemean Lion's skin draped over left arm, AITΩ/ΛΩN in two downward lines starting on the right, AP monogram upper left; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; SOLD




  




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