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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Greek Imperial ▸ MacedoniaView Options:  |  |  |     

Roman Provincial Coins from Macedonia

For twenty years, from 168 to 148 B.C., after the defeat of Perseus at the battle of Pydna, Macedonia was divided into four autonomous administrative regions. To weaken the power of the area and increase dependence on the empire, Rome took control of the mines and forests, demanded half of all taxes collected and banned trade between the regions. No coins were issued from 168 - 158 B.C. Between 158 and 148 B.C. the first (PROTES) region minted a large number of tetradrachms at its capital, Amphipolis. The second (DEUTERAS) region minted a small number of very rare tetradrachm at Thessalonica. The third region, its capital at Pella, and the fourth region, its capital at Heraclea Lynci, did not issue silver. In 148 B.C. the regions were reunited as a Roman province. Silver coinage was not struck for another half century, however, bronze coins were issued by governors, praetors, quaestors and individual cities. In 93 B.C., silver coinage resumed, the most prolific issue was that of the quaestor Aesillas. Macedonian cities continued to issue coinage in imperial times, some without the imperial bust.


Macedonia, Roman Rule, Quaestor Aesillas, 90 - 75 B.C.

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This type was apparently intended to encourage Macedonian pride by portraying the legendary national hero of the Macedonians, and at the same time clearly communicate Roman authority with name and symbols of the Roman quaestor.
SH77215. Silver tetradrachm, Bauslaugh Group VI, AMNG III 223; SNG Cop 1330; SNG Ashmolean 3305; SGCV I 1439, VF, nice style, light toning, die wear, weight 14.921 g, maximum diameter 28.3 mm, die axis 0o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, 90 - 75 B.C.; obverse head of Alexander the Great right with horn of Ammon and flowing hair, Θ behind, MAKE∆ONΩN below; reverse AESILLAS above money-chest (cista), club, and Q over quaestor's chair (sella curulis), all within laurel wreath, pellet at end of Q; $500.00 (€445.00)
 


Macedonia, Roman Rule, Quaestor Aesillas, 90 - 75 B.C.

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This type was apparently intended to encourage Macedonian pride by portraying the legendary national hero of the Macedonians, and at the same time clearly communicate Roman authority with name and symbols of the Roman quaestor.
SH77214. Silver tetradrachm, Bauslaugh Group VIII, O90/R328; SNG Ashmolean 3305; AMNG III 224; SNG Cop 1330; SGCV I 1439, VF, rose toning, crowded flan, die wear, weight 16.397 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 0o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, 90 - 75 B.C.; obverse head of Alexander the Great right with horn of Ammon and flowing hair, Θ behind, MAKE∆ONΩN below; reverse AESILLAS above money-chest (cista), club, and Q over quaestor's chair (sella curulis), all within laurel wreath, pellet on chest handle, pellet at center of wreath knot, pellet at end of Q; $450.00 (€400.50)
 


Roman Macedonia, "Thasian" Type, c. 148 - 80 B.C.

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This Dionysos / Herakles type was first struck by Thasos itself on the island and in its continental territories in the South of the Balkans, c. 168 - 148 B.C. After Rome took control of the area, "Thasian" types were struck by Roman authorities, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia but also, perhaps, by mobile military mints on campaigns. Imitatives were also struck by at least several tribal groups (mainly Celtic or mixed enclaves) from as early as 120 - 100 B.C. to about 20 - 10 B.C.
GS84941. Silver tetradrachm, Prokopov Thasos, group XVI, 1254 (O DD9 / R 888, unlisted reverse die); SNG Cop 1040 ff., gVF, attractive style, bold strike, bumps and marks, small edge crack, bent flan - left edge of obverse bent upward, weight 16.641 g, maximum diameter 32.9 mm, die axis 0o, Roman provincial or military mint, c. 148 - 80 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse HPAKΛEOYΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ ΘAΣIΩN, Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left hand on hip, MH monogram inner left; $350.00 (€311.50)
 


Macedonia, Roman Rule, Quaestor Aesillas, 90 - 75 B.C.

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This type was apparently intended to encourage Macedonian pride by portraying the legendary national hero of the Macedonians, and at the same time clearly communicate Roman authority with name and symbols of the Roman quaestor.
RS77035. Silver tetradrachm, Bauslaugh Group VI, SNG Lockett 1543, SNG Cop 1330, SNG Ashmolean 3305, AMNG III 223, SGCV I 1439, VF, toned, porous, light deposits of copper salts, weight 11.862 g, maximum diameter 28.3 mm, die axis 0o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, 90 - 75 B.C.; obverse head of Alexander the Great right with horn of Ammon and flowing hair, Θ behind, MAKE∆ONΩN below; reverse AESILLAS above money-chest (cista), club, and Q over quaestor's chair (sella curulis), all within laurel wreath, pellet below sella, pellet at end of Q; $320.00 (€284.80)
 


Sabina, Augusta 128 - c. 136 A.D., Wife of Hadrian, Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Plotina was the wife of Trajan, married to him before his succession. She was renowned for her virtue and simplicity. In 100, Trajan awarded her with the title of Augusta, but she did not accept the title until 105. Plotina did not appear on the coinage until 112. She was largely responsible for Hadrian's succession to the throne after the death of Trajan. Plotina died in 129 A.D.
RP83496. Bronze AE 25, RPC Online III 655 (8 spec.); BMC Macedonia p. 56, 103; Varbanov 3186 (R5); SNG Evelpidis 1171; Lindgren 987; SNG Cop -; SNG ANS -; SNG Hunterian -, VF, green patina, tight flan, some corrosion and scratches, reverse off center, centration dimples, weight 12.382 g, maximum diameter 24.5 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, 128 - c. 136 A.D.; obverse CABEINA CEBACTH, draped bust right wearing stephane, pellet within crescent with horns up left below chin; reverse AMΦIΠOΛTWN, Tyche seated left on high back throne, wearing turreted crown, patera in right hand; rare; $320.00 (€284.80)
 


Roman Macedonia, "Thasian" Type, c. 148 - 80 B.C.

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This Dionysos / Herakles type was first struck by Thasos itself on the island and in its continental territories in the South of the Balkans, c. 168 - 148 B.C. After Rome took control of the area, "Thasian" types were struck by Roman authorities, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia but also, perhaps, by mobile military mints on campaigns. Imitatives were also struck by at least several tribal groups (mainly Celtic or mixed enclaves) from as early as 120 - 100 B.C. to about 20 - 10 B.C.
GS79635. Silver tetradrachm, Prokopov Thasos, group XVI, 1226 (O DD4 / R 989); SNG Cop 1040 ff., VF, nice style, light toning, bumps and scratches, die wear, weight 16.787 g, maximum diameter 33.2 mm, die axis 0o, Roman provincial or military mint, c. 148 - 80 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse HPAKΛEOYΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ ΘAΣIΩN, Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left hand on hip, MH monogram inner left; $300.00 (€267.00)
 


Roman Macedonia, "Thasian" Type, c. 148 - 80 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
This Dionysos / Herakles type was first struck by Thasos itself on the island and in its continental territories in the South of the Balkans, c. 168 - 148 B.C. After Rome took control of the area, "Thasian" types were struck by Roman authorities, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia but also, perhaps, by mobile military mints on campaigns. Imitatives were also struck by at least several tribal groups (mainly Celtic or mixed enclaves) from as early as 120 - 100 B.C. to about 20 - 10 B.C.
GS79630. Silver tetradrachm, Prokopov Thasos, group XII, monogram 6, 743 (O AC8 / R 592); SNG Cop 1040 ff., VF, toned, bumps and marks, die wear, weight 16.745 g, maximum diameter 32.8 mm, die axis 0o, Roman provincial or military mint, c. 148 - 80 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse HPAKΛEOYΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ ΘAΣIΩN, Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left hand on hip, MH monogram inner left; $270.00 (€240.30)
 


Roman Macedonia, "Thasian" Type, c. 148 - 80 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
This Dionysos / Herakles type was first struck by Thasos itself on the island and in its continental territories in the South of the Balkans, c. 168 - 148 B.C. After Rome took control of the area, "Thasian" types were struck by Roman authorities, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia but also, perhaps, by mobile military mints on campaigns. Imitatives were also struck by at least several tribal groups (mainly Celtic or mixed enclaves) from as early as 120 - 100 B.C. to about 20 - 10 B.C.
GS79631. Silver tetradrachm, Prokopov Thasos, group XII, monogram 6, 834 (O AF4 / R 462); SNG Cop 1040 ff., VF, high relief convex obverse, concave reverse, toned, centered on a tight flan, die wear, scratches and marks, weight 16.949 g, maximum diameter 32.7 mm, die axis 315o, Roman provincial or military mint, c. 148 - 80 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse HPAKΛEOYΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ ΘAΣIΩN, Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left hand on hip, MH monogram inner left; $270.00 (€240.30)
 


Roman Macedonia, "Thasian" Type, c. 148 - 80 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
This Dionysos / Herakles type was first struck by Thasos itself on the island and in its continental territories in the South of the Balkans, c. 168 - 148 B.C. After Rome took control of the area, "Thasian" types were struck by Roman authorities, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia but also, perhaps, by mobile military mints on campaigns. Imitatives were also struck by at least several tribal groups (mainly Celtic or mixed enclaves) from as early as 120 - 100 B.C. to about 20 - 10 B.C.
GS79632. Silver tetradrachm, Prokopov Thasos, group XIV, monogram 24, cf. 1100 - 1104 (V CD3 / -); SNG Cop 1046, VF, centered, toned, struck with a worn obverse die, scrape on chin, scratches and marks, weight 16.690 g, maximum diameter 33.1 mm, die axis 0o, Roman provincial or military mint, c. 148 - 80 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse HPAKΛEOYΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ ΘAΣIΩN, Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left hand on hip, monogram inner left; $270.00 (€240.30)
 


Roman Macedonia, "Thasian" Type, c. 148 - 80 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
This Dionysos / Herakles type was first struck by Thasos itself on the island and in its continental territories in the South of the Balkans, c. 168 - 148 B.C. After Rome took control of the area, "Thasian" types were struck by Roman authorities, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia but also, perhaps, by mobile military mints on campaigns. Imitatives were also struck by at least several tribal groups (mainly Celtic or mixed enclaves) from as early as 120 - 100 B.C. to about 20 - 10 B.C.
GS79633. Silver tetradrachm, Prokopov Thasos, group XVI, 1226 (O DD4 / R 989); SNG Cop 1040 ff., aVF, nice style Herakles, some marks, small edge crack, weight 16.560 g, maximum diameter 32.1 mm, die axis 0o, Roman provincial or military mint, c. 148 - 80 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse HPAKΛEOYΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ ΘAΣIΩN, Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left hand on hip, MH monogram inner left; $270.00 (€240.30)
 


Roman Macedonia, "Thasian" Type, c. 148 - 80 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
This Dionysos / Herakles type was first struck by Thasos itself on the island and in its continental territories in the South of the Balkans, c. 168 - 148 B.C. After Rome took control of the area, "Thasian" types were struck by Roman authorities, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia but also, perhaps, by mobile military mints on campaigns. Imitatives were also struck by at least several tribal groups (mainly Celtic or mixed enclaves) from as early as 120 - 100 B.C. to about 20 - 10 B.C.
GS79634. Silver tetradrachm, Prokopov Thasos, group XII, monogram 6, 806 - 808 var. (O AE8 / R -); SNG Cop 1040 ff., F, centered on a tight flan, uneven toning, die wear, weight 16.664 g, maximum diameter 32.2 mm, die axis 0o, Roman provincial or military mint, c. 148 - 80 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse HPAKΛEOYΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ ΘAΣIΩN, Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left hand on hip, MH monogram inner left; $270.00 (€240.30)
 


Koinon of Macedonia, c. 244 - 245 A.D., Portrait of Alexander the Great

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The two temples and legend on the reverse indicate "Two Neokorie," advertising the Koinon of Macedonia held the highly prized designation "double temple guardian" of the imperial cult. The first Nekoros was awarded by Nerva. The second Neokoros, indicated by B (the Greek number two) or rarely ∆IC (double in Greek) on coins, was first received under Elagabalus. The title was rescinded but then later restored by Severus Alexander, probably in 231 A.D.
RP79978. Bronze AE 28, AMNG III 833; Mionnet supp. 3, p. 229, 446; BMC Macedonia -; SNG Cop -; SNG Hunterian -; SNG Bar -; SNG Saroglos -; Lindgren -, gF, obverse rough, smoothing on reverse, weight 11.370 g, maximum diameter 28.2 mm, die axis 90o, Macedonia, Beroea(?) mint, c. 244 -245 A.D.; obverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, diademed head of Alexander the Great right; reverse two hexastyle temple fronts, KOINON / M-AKE∆-O in two lines above, B NEΩKOPΩN / EOC (Era of Actium year 275) below;
very rare; $220.00 (€195.80)
 


Macedonia, Roman Protectorate, c. 166 - 165 B.C.

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Gaebler identified the Latin D on the reverse and the obverse type as a name pun for D. Junius Silanus, the Roman Praetor of Macedonia, in 142 - 141 B.C. This was a charming possibility but, based primarily on hoard evidence, MacKay (in ANSMN 14, 1968) and others have reassigned this type to the years immediately following the creation of the Roman Protectorate.
GB84933. Bronze AE 21, MacKay pp. 8 - 9 & pl. III, 10; BMC Macedonia p. 14, 55; SNG Cop 1324 - 1326; AMNG III 212, Touratsoglou Macedonia 25; SNG Tub 1224, VF, nice green patina, reverse a little off center, weight 8.044 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 270o, uncertain Macedonian mint, c. 166 - 165 B.C.; obverse facing mask of Silenos wearing ivy wreath; reverse MAKE/∆ONΩN in two lines, Latin letter D above, all within ivy wreath; scarce; $220.00 (€195.80)
 


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Amphipolis was home to an imperial cult, worshiping the living emperor, and to a cult dedicated to Artemis Tauropolos. The obverse depicts Trajan as a military victor and probably copies an imperial statue. The reverse may depict a local statue of Artemis Tauropolos.
GB90406. Bronze AE 20, Lindgren II 978 (same dies), Varbanov 7179 (R7), AMNG III 79, Hunterian I 37, Moushmov 6068, SNG ANS -, SNG Cop -, SNG Tub, BMC Macedonia -, gF, centered, some porosity, weight 5.099 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, 25 Jan 98 - 8/9 Aug 117 A.D.; obverse KAICAP TPAIANOC, emperor on horseback galloping right, brandishing spear to strike a prostrate foe below; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITWN, Artemis Tauropolos standing left, kalathos on head, long torch before her in right hand, small branch in left hand downward at side, grounded shield behind; rare; $160.00 (€142.40)
 


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Pella, Macedonia

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Pella was founded in 399 B.C. by King Archelaus (413 - 399 B.C.) as his capital. It was the seat of Philip II and of his son, Alexander the Great. In 168 B.C., it was sacked by the Romans, and its treasury transported to Rome. Later the city was destroyed by an earthquake. By 180 A.D., Lucian could describe it in passing as "now insignificant, with very few inhabitants."
RB79934. Bronze AE 24, Varbanov III 3735 (R4), SNG ANS 633, Moushmov 6479, SNG Cop -, F, superb portrait, attractive green patina, tight flan, weight 11.112 g, maximum diameter 24.2 mm, die axis 0o, Pella mint, 13 Mar 222 - Mar 235 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR SEV ALEXANDER AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse COL IVL AVG PELLA, city-goddess seated left, kalathos on head, right hand raised to shoulder; $160.00 (€142.40)
 


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Thessalonica, Macedonia

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Thessalonica was founded around 315 B.C. by Cassander, King of Macedonia, on or near the site of the ancient town of Therma. He named it after his wife Thessalonike, a daughter of Philip II and a half-sister of Alexander the Great. In 168 B.C. it became the capital of the Macedonia Secunda and in 146 B.C. it was made the capital of the whole Roman province of Macedonia. Due to its port and location at the intersection of two major Roman roads, Thessalonica grew to become the most important city in Macedonia. Thessalonica was important in the spread of Christianity; the First Epistle to the Thessalonians written by Paul the Apostle is the first written book of the New Testament.
RB79951. Bronze AE 29, Touratsoglou p. 186, 7 (V5/R9); RPC Online III 618; Varbanov III 4295 (R4); SNG ANS 849 var. (no crescent), SNG Cop 412 var. (same); BMC Macedonia -, F, excellent portrait, dark green patina, flan adjustment marks, centration dimples, weight 16.494 g, maximum diameter 28.5 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, emission 1, phase 1, 25 Jan 98 - 103 A.D.; obverse KAICAP TPAIANOC, laureate head right; reverse ΘECAΛΛONIKEWN, Victory flying right, raising wreath in extended right hand, palm frond over shoulder in left hand, small crescent with horns up in right field; $160.00 (€142.40)
 


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D., Koinon of Macedonia

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The Macedonian Koinon (community) was the political organization governing the autonomous Roman province of Macedonia and responsible for issuing coinage. Member cities sent representatives to participate in the popular assembly. The Koinon held celebrations and games annually at Beroea (modern Verria) in honor of Alexander the Great and the Roman emperor.
RB83510. Bronze AE 25, SNG Cop 1345; SNG Hunterian 730; AMNG III /2 277; Varbanov 3050 (R4) var. (Ω vice W); BMC Macedonia p. 28, 156 var. (laureate), VF, nice green patina, tight flan, cut on lower obverse, weight 11.478 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 270o, 7 Mar 161 - 17 Mar 180 A.D.; obverse KAICAP ANTWNINOC, radiate head right; reverse KOINON MAKE∆ONWN, thunderbolt with four wings; $160.00 (€142.40)
 


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Thessalonica, Macedonia

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Victory or Nike is seen with wings in most statues and paintings, with one of the most famous being the Winged Victory of Samothrace. Most other winged deities in the Greek pantheon had shed their wings by Classical times. Nike is the goddess of strength, speed, and victory. Nike was a very close acquaintance of Athena and is thought to have stood in Athena's outstretched hand in the statue of Athena located in the Parthenon. Victory or Nike is also one of the most commonly portrayed figures on Greek and Roman coins.
RP84963. Bronze AE 27, RPC IV 8302, Touratsoglou 38 ff., Varbanov 4338 (R5) var. (crescent and star right), SNG Hunterian -, BMC Macedonia -, SNG ANS -, SNG Cop -, VF, nice portrait, die wear, slight corrosion, tiny edge cracks, weight 12.628 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 0o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, 184 - 188 A.D.; obverse AVTOK M AVP KOMM ANTΩNEINON (clockwise from upper right), laureate head right; reverse ΘECCAΛONIKEΩN (clockwise from upper right), Nike advancing right, wreath in extended right hand, palm frond in left hand over left shoulder, crescent right; rare; $160.00 (€142.40)
 


Koinon of Macedonia, Reign of Gordian III, 238 - 244 A.D., Alexander and Bucephalus

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Plutarch tells the story of how, in 344 B.C. Philonicus the Thessalian, a horse dealer, offered a massive wild stallion to Alexander's father, King Philip II. Since no one could tame the animal, Philip was not interested. Alexander, however, seeing that the horse was afraid of his own shadow, promised to pay for the horse himself should he fail to tame it. He was given a chance and surprised all by subduing it. Alexander spoke soothingly to the horse and turned it towards the sun so that it could no longer see its shadow. Eventually, Bucephalus allowed Alexander to ride him. Embarrassed, Philip commented, "O my son, look thee out a kingdom equal to and worthy of thyself, for Macedonia is too little for thee." Alexander named the horse Bucephalus because the horse's head seemed "as broad as a bull's." Bucephalus died of battle wounds in 326 B.C., in Alexander's last battle. Alexander founded the city of Bucephala (thought to be the modern town of Jhelum, Pakistan) in memory of his wonderful horse.
SH65202. Bronze AE 25, AMNG III 724; cf BMC Macedonia p. 22, 102 (one neokorie); SNG Cop -; SNG Hunterian -; SNG Bar -; SNG Saroglos -; Lindgren -, F, weight 10.822 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 180o, Macedonia, Beroea(?) mint, 238 - 244 A.D.; obverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, head of Alexander the Great right, as Herakles, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse KOINON MAKE∆ONΩN B NEΩ, Alexander galloping left on his horse Bucephalus, about to spear a lion leaping left below; rare; $155.00 (€137.95)
 


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Amphipolis was home to an imperial cult, worshiping the living emperor, and to a cult dedicated to Artemis Tauropolos. The obverse depicts Trajan as a military victor and probably copies an imperial statue. The reverse may depict a local statue of Artemis Tauropolos.
GB90707. Bronze AE 20, Lindgren II 978 (same dies), Varbanov 7179 (R7), AMNG III 79, Hunterian I 37, Moushmov 6068, SNG ANS -, SNG Cop -, SNG Tub, BMC Macedonia -, F, weight 6.620 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, 25 Jan 98 - 8/9 Aug 117 A.D.; obverse KAICAP TPAIANOC, emperor on horseback galloping right, brandishing spear to strike a prostrate foe below; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITWN, Artemis Tauropolos standing left, kalathos on head, long torch before her in right hand, small branch in left hand downward at side, grounded shield behind; rare; $155.00 (€137.95)
 


Thessalonica, Macedonia, 88 - 31 B.C.

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King Cassander of Macedonia founded Thessalonica in 315 B.C. He named it after his wife Thessalonike, a half-sister of Alexander the Great. The Romans made Thessalonica the capital of the Roman province of Macedonia 168 B.C.
GB79940. Bronze AE 26, AMNG III 19, pl. 23, 9; SNG ANS 804; SNG Cop 369; BMC Macedonia p. 112, 35, F, green patina, weight 11.809 g, maximum diameter 25.9 mm, die axis 0o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, 88 - 31 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Janus, I above; reverse two Centaurs prancing, back to back, each with cloak flying behind and holding a branch, ΘEΣΣAΛO/NIKHΣ in two lines in exergue; $150.00 (€133.50)
 


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Thessalonica, Macedonia

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Thessalonica was founded around 315 B.C. by Cassander, King of Macedonia, on or near the site of the ancient town of Therma. He named it after his wife Thessalonike, a daughter of Philip II and a half-sister of Alexander the Great. In 168 B.C. it became the capital of the Macedonia Secunda and in 146 B.C. it was made the capital of the whole Roman province of Macedonia. Due to its port and location at the intersection of two major Roman roads, Thessalonica grew to become the most important city in Macedonia. Thessalonica was important in the spread of Christianity; the First Epistle to the Thessalonians written by Paul the Apostle is the first written book of the New Testament.
RP79950. Bronze AE 27, Touratsoglou p. 246, 5 (V6/-, unlisted rev. die); SNG Cop 422; Varbanov III 4471 (R3); BMC Macedonia p. 123, 109; SNG ANS 873 var. (bust from behind), VF, well centered and struck, nice green patina, small edge split, flan crack, light marks, weight 11.341 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 0o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, 13 Mar 222 - Mar 235 A.D.; obverse AV K M AV CEV AΛEΞAN∆POC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse ΘECCAΛONIKEΩN, Nike advancing left, Kabeiros in extended right hand, palm frond in left hand; scarce; $150.00 (€133.50)
 


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Tyche (Greek for luck; the Roman equivalent was Fortuna) was the presiding tutelary deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. Increasingly during the Hellenistic period, cities had their own specific iconic version of Tyche, wearing a mural crown (a crown like the walls of the city).
RP79963. Bronze AE 22, Varbanov III 3298; SNG Cop 118; BMC Macedonia p. 59, 133; SNG ANS 205 corr. (obv. leg.); AMNG III 88 var. (Tyche wears kalathos, holds scepter), VF, well centered, nice green patina, weight 5.546 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, 13 Mar 222 - Mar 235 A.D.; obverse AV K M AVP CEV AΛEΞAN∆POC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITΩN, turreted city goddess enthroned left, patera in extended right hand, fish left in exergue; $150.00 (€133.50)
 


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Excavations of Roman Amphipolis have revealed traces of all the impressive architecture one would expect from a thriving Roman city. A bridge, gymnasium, public and private monuments, sanctuaries, and cemeteries all attest to the city's prosperity. From the early Christian period (after 500 CE) there are traces of four basilicas, a large rectangular building which may have been a bishop's residence, and a church. -- Ancient History Encyclopedia
RP84023. Bronze AE 23, BMC Macedonia p. 58, 126 (same obverse die); Varbanov 3268 (R4) var. (obv. legend); Moushmov 6106; SNG Cop -, aVF, attractive portrait, dark patina, porous, centration dimples, weight 8.283 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, 9 Apr 193 - 4 Feb 211 A.D.; obverse Λ CEΠT CE-OYHPOC ΠEP A-YΓ (YHP ligate), laureate and draped bust right; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITWN, Tyche of Amphipolis seated left on a throne, wearing kalathos, veil, long chiton and mantle, phiale in extended right hand, star below seat; $150.00 (€133.50)
 


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Amphipolis was on the Via Egnatia, the principal Roman road crossing the southern Balkans. In 50, the apostle Paul visited Amphipolis on his way to Thessaloniki. Many Christian churches were built indicating prosperity, but the region grew increasingly dangerous. In the 6th century, the population had declined considerably and the old perimeter was no longer defensible against Slavic invasions. The lower city was plundered for materials to fortify the Acropolis. In the 7th century, a new wall was built, right through the bath and basilica, dividing the Acropolis. The remaining artisans moved to houses and workshops built in the unused cisterns of the upper city. In the 8th century, the last inhabitants probably abandoned the city and moved to nearby Chrysopolis (formerly Eion, once the port of Amphipolis).
RP83483. Bronze AE 24, RPC IV online 7653 (5 spec.), SNG Cop 109, SNG Evelpidis 1186, Varbanov III 3244 (R4) var. (obv. leg.), BMC Macedonia p. 57, 116 var. (same), aVF, well centered, bumps, areas of light corrosion, flan flaw (pit) obverse center, weight 8.624 g, maximum diameter 24.2 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, c. 188 - 190 A.D.; obverse AVTOK M AVP KOMM ANTΩNEINON, laureate head right; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITWN, Tyche seated left on high-backed throne, wearing crown of city walls, right leg drawn back, patera in extended right hand, left elbow on back of throne; $150.00 (€133.50)
 


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Thessalonica, Macedonia

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The god Kabeiros is similar in appearance to Dionysos and the rites of his cult were likely similar to those of the Dionysian mysteries. The attributes of Kabeiros are a rhyton and hammer.
RP83493. Bronze AE 26, Touratsoglou p. 262, 25 (V2/R20), Varbanov III 4545 (R3), SNG Hunterian 714, SNG Cop 426, SNG Evelpidis 1348, BMC Macedonia p. 124, 116, aVF, excellent portrait, green patina, large centration dimple on obverse, bumps and marks, some light corrosion, weight 9.207 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, 29 Jul 238 - 25 Feb 244 A.D.; obverse AV K M ANT ΓOP∆IANOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ΘECCAΛONIKEΩN, Nike advancing left, Kabeiros holding hammer in her right hand, palm frond in her left hand; $150.00 (€133.50)
 


Faustina Junior, Augusta 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Tauropolos is an epithet for the goddess Artemis, variously interpreted as worshiped at Tauris, or pulled by a yoke of bulls, or hunting bull goddess. A statue of Artemis "Tauropolos" by Iphigenia in her temple at Brauron in Attica was supposed to have been brought from the Taurians. Tauropolia was a festival of Artemis held at Athens. - Wikipedia
RP83505. Bronze AE 18, Varbanov III 3225 (R4); AMNG III / 2 p. 42, 83; SNG Hunterian 775; SNG Cop 107; SNG ANS 191; BMC Macedonia p. 57, 112; SGICV 1720, VF, well centered and struck, green patina, tight flan, light corrosion, weight 3.014 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 90o, Amphipolis mint, 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D.; obverse FAVCTEINA CEBACTH, draped bust right, hair in a braided bun at the back; reverse AMΦIΠOΛITΩN, Artemis Tauropolos riding aside facing on bull galloping right, bow in left hand extended before her, drawing arrow from quiver at shoulder with right hand; $150.00 (€133.50)
 


Maximinus I Thrax, 20 March 235 - Late May 238 A.D., Pella, Macedonia

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Pella was founded in 399 B.C. by King Archelaus (413 - 399 B.C.) as his capital. It was the seat of Philip II and of his son, Alexander the Great. In 168 B.C., it was sacked by the Romans, and its treasury transported to Rome. Later the city was destroyed by an earthquake. By 180 A.D., Lucian could describe it in passing as "now insignificant, with very few inhabitants."
RP83513. Bronze AE 26, SNG ANS 636, Varbanov III 3742 (R4) var. (bust also draped), AMNG III / 2 p. 99, 34 var. (same); SNG Hunterian 658 var. (same); BMC Macedonia -, aVF, excellent portrait, areas not fully struck, holed, slightly off center on a tight flan, centration dimple on reverse, weight 8.921 g, maximum diameter 26.0 mm, die axis 90o, Pella mint, 20 Mar 235 - Late May 238 A.D.; obverse IMP C C IVL VER MAXIMINVS, laureate and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse COL IVL AVG PELLA, Spes seated left, putting her right hand to her mouth; $150.00 (€133.50)
 


Mark Antony and Octavian, 2nd Triumvirate, Thessalonica, Macedonia, 37 B.C.

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The reverse inscription abbreviates, MAPKOΣ ANTΩNIONΣ AYTOKPATΩP ΓAIOΣ KAIΣAP AYTOKPATΩP. The bust of Libertas on the obverse "refers to the grant of freedom by the Triumvirs to Thessalonica in 42 BC after the battle of Philippi (the victory which is celebrated on the reverse)." -- RPC I, p. 29

In 37 B.C., Cleopatra loaned Antony the money for the army. After a five-month siege, the Romans took Jerusalem from the Parthians. Herod the Great made king by Anthony, took control of his capital. Antigonus was taken to Antioch where Antony had him executed. Thousands of Jews were slaughtered by the Roman troops supporting Herod.
RP83539. Bronze AE 29, BMC Macedonia p. 115, 63; RPC I 1551/20-26; Sear CRI 672; SNG Cop 374; SNG ANS 823, aF, green patina on yellow brass, edge splits corrosion, weight 23.685 g, maximum diameter 28.4 mm, die axis 0o, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, 37 B.C.; obverse ΘEΣΣAΛONKEΩN EΛEYΘEPIAΣ, diademed and draped bust of Eleutheria (Liberty) right, E (year 5) below chin; reverse M ANT AYT Γ KAI AYT, Nike advancing left, extending wreath in right hand, palm frond in left; $145.00 (€129.05)
 


Mark Antony and Octavian, 2nd Triumvirate, Thessalonica, Macedonia, 37 B.C.

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The reverse inscription abbreviates, MAPKOΣ ANTΩNIONΣ AYTOKPATΩP ΓAIOΣ KAIΣAP AYTOKPATΩP. The bust of Libertas on the obverse "refers to the grant of freedom by the Triumvirs to Thessalonica in 42 BC after the battle of Philippi (the victory which is celebrated on the reverse)." -- RPC I, p. 29

In 37 B.C., Cleopatra loaned Antony the money for the army. After a five-month siege, the Romans took Jerusalem from the Parthians. Herod the Great made king by Anthony, took control of his capital. Antigonus was taken to Antioch where Antony had him executed. Thousands of Jews were slaughtered by the Roman troops supporting Herod.
SH72307. Bronze AE 29, BMC Macedonia p. 115, 63; RPC I 1551/20-26; Sear CRI 672; SNG Cop 374; SNG ANS 823, aVF, weight 17.561 g, maximum diameter 29.3 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, 37 B.C.; obverse ΘEΣΣAΛONKEΩN EΛEYΘEPIAΣ, diademed and draped bust of Eleutheria (Liberty) right, E (year 5) below chin; reverse M ANT AYT Γ KAI AYT, Nike advancing left, extending wreath in right hand, palm frond in left; $140.00 (€124.60)
 


Koinon of Macedonia, Reign of Gordian III, c. 238 - 244 A.D., Portrait of Alexander the Great

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The Macedonian Koinon (community) was the political organization governing the autonomous Roman province of Macedonia and was responsible for issuing coinage. The individual cities, as members of the Koinon, sent representatives to participate in popular assembly several times each year.

The high point of the year was celebrations and matches in honor of Alexander the Great and the Roman emperor held in Beroea (modern Verria) located about 75 km. west of Thessaloniki. This was the provincial center of the emperor cult, with the appropriate temple and privileges, first granted to the Koinon by Nerva. The title Neokoros, or "temple guardians" was highly prized and thus advertised on coins. Under Elagabalus, the Koinon received a second neokorie, indicated by B (the Greek number two) or rarely DIC (double in Greek). The title was rescinded but later restored by Severus Alexander, probably in 231 A.D.
RP76989. Bronze AE 28, AMNG III 617, SNG Cop 1369 var. (B NEΩ), SNG Saroglos 984 (same), Macdonald Hunter 8, Lindgren I 1381 var. (B N), BMC Macedonia -, aVF, well centered, glossy dark green patina, weight 12.400 g, maximum diameter 27.9 mm, die axis 225o, Macedonia, Beroea(?) mint, reign of Gordian III, 238 - 244 A.D.; obverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, diademed head of Alexander the Great right; reverse KOINON MAKE∆ONΩN B NE, Athena seated left, Nike holding wreath in right hand, spear in left hand, shield behind; scarce; $140.00 (€124.60)
 


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Amphipolis was on the Via Egnatia, the principal Roman across southern Balkans. In 50, the apostle Paul visited Amphipolis on his way to Thessaloniki. Many Christian churches were built indicating prosperity, but the region grew increasingly dangerous. In the 6th century, the population had declined considerably and the old perimeter was no longer defensible against Slavic invasions. The lower city was plundered for materials to fortify the Acropolis. In the 7th century, a new wall was built, right through the bath and basilica, dividing the Acropolis. The remaining artisans moved to houses and workshops built in the unused cisterns of the upper city. In the 8th century, the last inhabitants probably abandoned the city and moved to nearby Chrysopolis (formerly Eion, once the port of Amphipolis).
RP79943. Bronze AE 25, Varbanov III 3315 (R4); AMNG III p. 43, 89; BMC Macedonia p. 60, 140 var. (obv. legend); SNG Cop 122; SNG ANS -; SNG Righetti -, aVF, obverse slightly off center, some legend weak, porous, weight 9.199 g, maximum diameter 25.4 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, Aug 253 - Sep 268 A.D.; obverse AVT ΠO ΛIKIN EΓ ΓAΛΛHNOC (OC ligate), radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITΩN, City-goddess seated left on high-backed throne, kalathos on head, statue of Artemis Tauropolos in extended right hand, cornucopia in left hand, fish left in exergue; $140.00 (€124.60)
 


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Amphipolis was home to an imperial cult, worshiping the living emperor, and to a cult dedicated to Artemis Tauropolos. The reverse likely depicts a local statue of Artemis Tauropolos.
RP79971. Bronze AE 22, RPC II 339; BMC Macedonia p. 54, 91 - 93; SNG ANS 177; SNG Cop 100; Lindgren II 976, F, green patina, weight 5.991 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, 13 Sep 81 - 18 Sep 96 A.D.; obverse AYTO KAICAP ∆OMITIANOC, laureate head right; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITΩN, Artemis Tauropolos standing left, kalathos on head, long torch before her in right hand, small branch in left hand downward at side, grounded shield behind; $140.00 (€124.60)
 


Philippi, Macedonia, 41 - 68 A.D.

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This coin has traditionally been attributed to Augustus, but due to its copper composition, RPC attributes it as likely from Claudius to Nero; Philippi probably did not issue copper coins during the reign of Augustus.
RP84961. Bronze AE 20, RPC I 1651, Varbanov III 3229, SGICV 32, SNG Cop 305, AMNG III 14, BMC Macedonia 23, VF, dark patina, some light corrosion, weight 5.683 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 0o, Philippi mint, 41 - 68 A.D.; obverse Victory standing left on base, raising wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand over left shoulder, VIC - AVG divided across field; reverse COHOR PRAE PHIL, three standards; $140.00 (€124.60)
 


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Thessalonica, Macedonia

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The god Kabeiros is similar in appearance to Dionysos and the rites of his cult were likely similar to those of the Dionysian mysteries. The attributes of Kabeiros are a rhyton and hammer.
RP59998. Bronze AE 25, Varbanov III 4709, BMC Macedonia p. 127, 133, SNG Cop -, VF, light scratches, weight 8.831 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 0o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, obverse AYK K M IOY ΦIΛIΠΠOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse ΘECCAΛONIKEΩN ΠYΘIA, Apollo standing left, small Kabeiros in right, laurel branch in left, at his feet, agonistic urn containing a palm branch rests on a table; scarce; $135.00 (€120.15)
 


Mark Antony and Octavian, 2nd Triumvirate, Thessalonica, Macedonia, 37 B.C.

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The reverse inscription abbreviates, MAPKOΣ ANTΩNIONΣ AYTOKPATΩP ΓAIOΣ KAIΣAP AYTOKPATΩP. The bust of Libertas on the obverse "refers to the grant of freedom by the Triumvirs to Thessalonica in 42 BC after the battle of Philippi (the victory which is celebrated on the reverse)." -- RPC I, p. 29

In 37 B.C., Cleopatra loaned Antony the money for the army. After a five-month siege, the Romans took Jerusalem from the Parthians. Herod the Great made king by Anthony, took control of his capital. Antigonus was taken to Antioch where Antony had him executed. Thousands of Jews were slaughtered by the Roman troops supporting Herod.
SH63716. Bronze AE 31, BMC Macedonia p. 115, 63; RPC I 1551; Sear CRI 672; SNG Cop 374; SNG ANS 823, F, green patina, scratches, rough areas, weight 18.710 g, maximum diameter 31.0 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, 37 B.C.; obverse ΘEΣΣAΛONKEΩN EΛEYΘEPIAΣ, diademed and draped bust of Eleutheria (Liberty) right, E (year 5) below chin; reverse M ANT AYT Γ KAI AYT, Nike advancing left, extending wreath in right hand, palm frond in left; $135.00 (€120.15)
 


Koinon of Macedonia, Reign of Severus Alexander, c. 231 - 235 A.D., Alexander and Bucephalus

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Plutarch tells the story of how, in 344 B.C. Philonicus the Thessalian, a horse dealer, offered a massive wild stallion to Alexander's father, King Philip II. Since no one could tame the animal, Philip was not interested. Alexander, however, seeing that the horse was afraid of his own shadow, promised to pay for the horse himself should he fail to tame it. He was given a chance and surprised all by subduing it. Alexander spoke soothingly to the horse and turned it towards the sun so that it could no longer see its shadow. Eventually, Bucephalus allowed Alexander to ride him. Embarrassed, Philip commented, "O my son, look thee out a kingdom equal to and worthy of thyself, for Macedonia is too little for thee." Alexander named the horse Bucephalus because the horse's head seemed "as broad as a bull's." Bucephalus died of battle wounds in 326 B.C., in Alexander's last battle. Alexander founded the city of Bucephala (thought to be the modern town of Jhelum, Pakistan) in memory of his wonderful horse.
SH90947. Bronze AE 26, AMNG III 423; BMC Macedonia p. 23, 104; Lindgren 1379; SNG Hunterian 735 var. (no star); cf. SNG Cop 1372 (2 neokorie); SNG Bar -, gVF, reverse pitted, weight 13.804 g, maximum diameter 26.0 mm, die axis 225o, Macedonia, Beroea(?) mint, c. 231 - 235 A.D.; obverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, head of Alexander the Great right, as Herakles, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse KOINON MAKE∆ONΩN NEΩ, Alexander riding his horse Bucephalus right, wearing military garb, cloak flying behind, couched spear in right hand, reins in left, star below; $135.00 (€120.15)
 


Maximinus I Thrax, 20 March 235 - Late May 238 A.D., Thessalonica, Macedonia

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The god Kabeiros is similar in appearance to Dionysos and the rites of his cult were likely similar to those of the Dionysian mysteries. The attributes of Kabeiros are a rhyton and hammer.
RP83454. Bronze AE 24, SNG ANS 875 corr. (obv. leg.); Varbanov 4500 (R4) var. (obv. leg.); BMC Macedonia p. 123, 112 var. (same), VF, fantastic portrait, centered on a tight flan, flatly struck centers, light marks, centration dimple on reverse, weight 12.268 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 0o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, 20 Mar 235 - Late May 238 A.D.; obverse AVT K Γ IOVΛ OVHP MAΞIMINOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse ΘECCAΛONIKEΩN, Nike flying left, she hold Kabeiros standing left holding rhyton and hammer in her right hand, palm frond in her left hand; scarce obv. legend variety; $135.00 (€120.15)
 


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Thessalonica, Macedonia

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Thessalonica was founded around 315 B.C. by Cassander, King of Macedonia, on or near the site of the ancient town of Therma. He named it after his wife Thessalonike, a daughter of Philip II and a half-sister of Alexander the Great. In 168 B.C. it became the capital of the Macedonia Secunda and in 146 B.C. it was made the capital of the whole Roman province of Macedonia. Due to its port and location at the intersection of two major Roman roads, Thessalonica grew to become the most important city in Macedonia. Thessalonica was important in the spread of Christianity; the First Epistle to the Thessalonians written by Paul the Apostle is the first written book of the New Testament.
RP83478. Bronze AE 24, Touratsoglou 158 (V25/R55), McClean 3793, Varbanov 4416 (R6), Moushmov 6753, SNG Cop -, SNG ANS -, BMC Macedonia -, F, green patina, a few minor scratches, edge bump, weight 6.654 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 90o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, obverse AV K M AVP ANTΩNINOC, laureate head right; reverse ΘECCAΛONKEΩN, Nike standing right, left foot on helmet, shield held with both hands and resting on left knee; $135.00 (€120.15)
 


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Tyche (Greek for luck; the Roman equivalent was Fortuna) was the presiding tutelary deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. Increasingly during the Hellenistic period, cities had their own specific iconic version of Tyche, wearing a mural crown (a crown like the walls of the city).
RP83502. Bronze AE 23, Varbanov III 3277 (R4); BMC Macedonia p. 59, 128; SNG Hunterian 778; SNG Cop 112 var. (obv. leg.); SNG ANS -, VF, green patina, weight 6.845 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, 28 Jan 198 - 8 Apr 217 A.D.; obverse AVT K - ANTΩNOINOC, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITΩN, city goddess enthroned left, wearing turreted crown, patera in extended right hand, left hand at her side; $135.00 (€120.15)
 


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Amphipolis was on the Via Egnatia, the principal Roman road crossing the southern Balkans. In 50, the apostle Paul visited Amphipolis on his way to Thessaloniki. Many Christian churches were built indicating prosperity, but the region grew increasingly dangerous. In the 6th century, the population had declined considerably and the old perimeter was no longer defensible against Slavic invasions. The lower city was plundered for materials to fortify the Acropolis. In the 7th century, a new wall was built, right through the bath and basilica, dividing the Acropolis. The remaining artisans moved to houses and workshops built in the unused cisterns of the upper city. In the 8th century, the last inhabitants probably abandoned the city and moved to nearby Chrysopolis (formerly Eion, once the port of Amphipolis).
SH58235. Bronze AE 25, SNG Evelpidis 1186, Varbanov III 3250 var. (fish in ex., same obv. die), BMC 118 var. (same), SNG Cop 109 var. (legend), SNG ANS 194 var. (same, etc.), VF, weight 8.849 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 225o, Amphipolis mint, obverse AYTOK M AYP KOMMO∆OC ANTON, laureate head right; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITΩN, City-goddess seated left on high-backed throne, polos on head, patera in extended right; rare; $125.00 (€111.25)
 


Philippi, Macedonia, 41 - 68 A.D.

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This coin has traditionally been attributed to Augustus, but due to its copper composition, RPC attributes it as likely from Claudius to Nero; Philippi probably did not issue copper coins during the reign of Augustus.
RP83476. Bronze AE 23, RPC I 1651, Varbanov III 3229, SGICV 32, SNG Cop 305, AMNG III 14, BMC Macedonia 23, VF, centered on a tight flan, grainy green patina, small edge cracks, weight 4.619 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 0o, Philippi mint, 41 - 68 A.D.; obverse VIC - AVG, Victory standing left on base, raising wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand over left shoulder; reverse COHOR PRAE PHIL, three standards; $120.00 (€106.80)
 


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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In 168 B.C., the Romans invaded Macedonia and overthrew King Perseus in the First Battle of Pydna. In 149 B.C., Andriskos, at that time ruler of Adramyttium only, claiming to be Perseus' son, announced his intention to retake Macedonia from Rome. Andriskos traveled to Syria to request military help from Demetrius Soter of Syria. Demetrius instead handed him over to Rome. Andriskos escaped captivity, raised a Thracian army, invaded Macedonia, and defeated the Roman praetor Publius Juventius. Andriskos then declared himself King Philip VI of Macedonia. In 148 B.C., Andriskos conquered Thessaly and made an alliance with Carthage, thus bringing the Roman wrath on him. In 148 B.C., in what the Romans called the Fourth Macedonian War, he was defeated by the Roman praetor Q. Caecilius Metellus at the Second Battle of Pydna. He fled to Thrace, whose prince gave him up to Rome. Andriskos' brief reign over Macedonia was marked by cruelty and extortion. After this, Macedonia was formally reduced to a Roman province.
RP66850. Bronze AE 24, RPC Online IV 4232; AMNG III 81; SNG ANS 183; SNG Cop 104; Evelpidis 1172 ff.; McClean II 3241, pl. 118, 9; BMC Macedonia -, VF, green patina, weight 8.475 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, obverse KAICAP ANTΩNINOC, laureate head right; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITWN, Tyche seated left, wearing turreted crown, patera in right, center dimple; scarce; $110.00 (€97.90)
 


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Tauropolos is an epithet for the goddess Artemis, variously interpreted as worshiped at Tauris, or pulled by a yoke of bulls, or hunting bull goddess. A statue of Artemis "Tauropolos" by Iphigenia in her temple at Brauron in Attica was supposed to have been brought from the Taurians. Tauropolia was a festival of Artemis held at Athens. - Wikipedia
RP77235. Bronze AE 22, RPC I 1630; SNG ANS 162; SNG Cop 92; AMNG III 71; BMC Macedonia p. 52, 76; Varbanov III 3117 (R5), aVF, nice green patina, weight 8.974 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, 16 Jan 27 B.C. - 19 Aug 14 A.D.; obverse KAIΣAP ΣEBAΣTOΣ, bare head right; reverse ∆HMOY AMΦIΠOΛITΩN, Artemis Tauropolos seated facing riding on bull galloping right, holding billowing veil with both hands; $110.00 (€97.90)
 


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Tauropolos is an epithet for the goddess Artemis, variously interpreted as worshiped at Tauris, or pulled by a yoke of bulls, or hunting bull goddess. A statue of Artemis "Tauropolos" by Iphigenia in her temple at Brauron in Attica was supposed to have been brought from the Taurians. Tauropolia was a festival of Artemis held at Athens. - Wikipedia
RP77237. Bronze AE 21, RPC I 1633; SNG ANS 170; SNG Cop 96; Varbanov III 3141; BMC Macedonia p. 53, 82, VF, green patina, weight 9.004 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, 19 Aug 14 - 16 Mar 37 A.D.; obverse TI KAIΣAP ΣEBAΣTOΣ, laureate head left; reverse AMΦIΠOΛITΩN, Artemis Tauropolos riding aside facing on bull galloping right, holding billowing inflated veil overhead with both hands; $100.00 (€89.00)
 


Mark Antony and Octavian, 2nd Triumvirate, Thessalonica, Macedonia, 37 B.C.

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The obverse and reverse legends combined indicate this coin celebrates the Homonoia between Thessalonica and Rome which was established by the triumvirs.

In 37 B.C., Cleopatra loaned Antony the money for the army. After a five-month siege, the Romans took Jerusalem from the Parthians. Herod the Great made king by Anthony, took control of his capital. Antigonus was taken to Antioch where Antony had him executed. Thousands of Jews were slaughtered by the Roman troops supporting Herod.
RP84077. Bronze AE 20, RPC I 1553; BMC Macedonia p. 113, 43; SNG ANS 806; SNG Cop 378; AMNG III/2, p. 121, 24; McClean 3772, aVF, slightly rough, reverse off center, weight 7.814 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 45o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, c. 37 B.C.; obverse OMONOIA, veiled bust of Homonoia right, wearing stephane; reverse horse galloping right, ΘEΣ/ΣAΛON in two lines above, PΩM below; scarce; $100.00 (€89.00)
 


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Tauropolos is an epithet for the goddess Artemis, variously interpreted as worshiped at Tauris, or pulled by a yoke of bulls, or hunting bull goddess. A statue of Artemis "Tauropolos" by Iphigenia in her temple at Brauron in Attica was supposed to have been brought from the Taurians. Tauropolia was a festival of Artemis held at Athens. - Wikipedia
RP77233. Bronze AE 21, RPC I 1633; SNG ANS 170; SNG Cop 96; Varbanov III 3141; BMC Macedonia p. 53, 82, VF, green patina, weight 8.719 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, 19 Aug 14 - 16 Mar 37 A.D.; obverse TI KAIΣAP ΣEBAΣTOΣ, laureate head left; reverse AMΦIΠOΛITΩN, Artemis Tauropolos riding aside facing on bull galloping right, holding billowing inflated veil overhead with both hands; $95.00 (€84.55)
 


Macedonia, Roman Protectorate, c. 168 - 166 B.C.

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On 22 June 168 B.C., Lucius Aemilius Paullus defeated the Macedonian King Perseus at the Battle of Pydna, and Macedonia came under Roman rule. This coin was struck shortly after Rome's victory, under the quaestor Gaius Publilius.
GB84140. Bronze AE 22, SNG Cop 1320, MacKay p. 5, BMC Macedonia -, gF, near black dark patina, well centered, obverse high point not fully struck, lower half of reverse very weakly struck, weight 11.367 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, Gaius Publilius, quaestor, 168 - 166 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Roma (or Perseus) right, helmet with visor and crest, ornamented with scroll, wings, and head of a griffin; reverse ΓAIOY TAMIOY / ΠOΠΛIΛIOY in two lines within oak wreath; rare; $95.00 (€84.55)
 


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Amphipolis was home to an imperial cult, worshiping the living emperor, and to a cult dedicated to Artemis Tauropolos. The reverse likely depicts a local statue of Artemis Tauropolos.
RP84053. Bronze AE 19, RPC II 339; BMC Macedonia p. 54, 91 - 93; SNG ANS 177; SNG Cop 100; Lindgren II 976, F, obverse off-center, edge cracks, some corrosion, weight 2.952 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, 13 Sep 81 - 18 Sep 96 A.D.; obverse AYTO KAICAP ∆OMITIANOC, laureate head right; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITΩN, Artemis Tauropolos standing left, kalathos on head, long torch before her in right hand, small branch in left hand downward at side, grounded shield behind; $90.00 (€80.10)
 


Amphipolis, Macedonia, c. 168 - 31 B.C.

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In 168 B.C., the Romans invaded Macedonia and overthrew King Perseus in the First Battle of Pydna. In 149 B.C., Andriskos, at that time ruler of Adramyttium only, claiming to be Perseus' son, announced his intention to retake Macedonia from Rome. Andriskos traveled to Syria to request military help from Demetrius Soter of Syria. Demetrius instead handed him over to Rome. Andriskos escaped captivity, raised a Thracian army, invaded Macedonia, and defeated the Roman praetor Publius Juventius. Andriskos then declared himself King Philip VI of Macedonia. In 148 B.C., Andriskos conquered Thessaly and made an alliance with Carthage, thus bringing the Roman wrath on him. In 148 B.C., in what the Romans called the Fourth Macedonian War, he was defeated by the Roman praetor Q. Caecilius Metellus at the Second Battle of Pydna. He fled to Thrace, whose prince gave him up to Rome. Andriskos' brief reign over Macedonia was marked by cruelty and extortion. After this, Macedonia was formally reduced to a Roman province.
GB84830. Bronze AE 21, SNG Cop 58; SNG ANS 104 (monograms obscure); AMNG III.2 p. 34, 29 var. (different monograms); BMC Macedonia -; SNG Dreer -; SNG Berry -, VF, dark patina, slightly rough, tiny edge split, weight 10.444 g, maximum diameter 21.4 mm, die axis 315o, Amphipolis mint, c. 187 - 31 B.C.; obverse head of Roma right, wearing earring, necklace, and Phrygian helmet ornamented with the wings, dorsal spines, and head of a griffin; reverse AMFIPO/LITWN in two lines, ΩΠNK monogram above, ΩΣ monogram below, all within oak wreath; ex Roma Auction 4 (30 Sep 2012), lot 1157; $90.00 (€80.10)
 




    



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REFERENCES

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Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints from the Lindgren Collection. (1989).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins from the Lindgren Collection. (1993).
MacKay, P. "Bronze Coinage in Macedonia, 168-166 B.C." in ANS MN 14 (1968), pp. 5 - 13, pl. III.
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RPC Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/
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Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Greece, Volume IV, Numismatic Museum, Athens, The Petros Z. Saroglos Collection, Part 1: Macedonia. (Athens, 2005).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, The Collection of the American Numismatic Society, Part 7: Macedonia 1 (Cities, Thraco-Macedonian Tribes, Paeonian kings). (New York, 1987).
Touratsoglou, I. Die Münzstätte von Thessaloniki in der römischen Kaiserzeit. AMUGS XII. (Berlin, 1988).
Varbanov, I. Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Vol. III: Thrace (from Perinthus to Trajanopolis), Chersonesos Thraciae, Insula Thraciae, Macedonia. (Bourgas, 2007).

Catalog current as of Thursday, May 25, 2017.
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Roman Macedonia