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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Heros| ▸ |Other Heros||View Options:  |  |  |   

Other Heros
Taras, Calabria, Italy, c. 302 - 281 B.C.

|Italy|, |Taras,| |Calabria,| |Italy,| |c.| |302| |-| |281| |B.C.||nomos|
Taras, the only Spartan colony, was founded in 706 B.C. The founders were Partheniae ("sons of virgins"), sons of unmarried Spartan women and Perioeci (free men, but not citizens of Sparta). These out-of-wedlock unions were permitted to increase the prospective number of soldiers (only the citizens could be soldiers) during the bloody Messenian wars. Later, however, when they were no longer needed, their citizenship was retroactively nul|lified and the sons were obliged to leave Greece forever. Their leader, Phalanthus, consulted the oracle at Delphi and was told to make the harbor of Taranto their home. They named the city Taras after the son of Poseidon, and of a local nymph, Satyrion. The reverse depicts Taras being saved from a shipwreck by a dolphin sent to him by Poseidon. This symbol of the ancient Greek city is still the symbol of modern Taranto today.
SH75332. Silver nomos, Vlasto 696 corr. (∆A not WA), SNG ANS 1071 corr. (same), HN Italy 967, SNG BnF -, SNG Cop -, gVF/VF, superb style, excellent centering, attractive toning, light corrosion, weight 7.302 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, Taras (Taranto, Italy) mint, c. 302 - 281 B.C.; obverse warrior on horseback right, thrusting spear downward with right hand, holding two spears and shield in his left hand, ΣI upper left, ∆AKIMOΣ below right; reverse Phalanthos (or Taras) on dolphin left, small dolphin in his extended right hand, cradling cornucopia in left arm, TAPAΣ downward behind, ∆A below right; rare; SOLD


Taras, Calabria, Italy, c. 280 - 272 B.C.

|Italy|, |Taras,| |Calabria,| |Italy,| |c.| |280| |-| |272| |B.C.||nomos|
Taras, the only Spartan colony, was founded in 706 B.C. The founders were Partheniae ("sons of virgins"), sons of unmarried Spartan women and Perioeci (free men, but not citizens of Sparta). These out-of-wedlock unions were permitted to increase the prospective number of soldiers (only the citizens could be soldiers) during the bloody Messenian wars. Later, however, when they were no longer needed, their citizenship was retroactively nullified and the sons were obliged to leave Greece forever. Their leader, Phalanthos, consulted the oracle at Delphi and was told to make the harbor of Taranto their home. They named the city Taras after the son of Poseidon, and of a local nymph, Satyrion. The reverse depicts Taras being saved from a shipwreck by a dolphin sent to him by Poseidon. This symbol of the ancient Greek city is still the symbol of modern Taranto today.
GS85114. Silver nomos, Vlasto 739 ff., HN Italy 1006, SNG ANS 1106 ff., SNG BnF 1904 ff., SNG Munchen 669 ff., SNG Lloyd 206, Dewing 211, EF, lovely old cabinet toning with hints of iridescence, well centered, beautiful depiction of Phalanthos, some obverse die wear, weight 6.537 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 45o, Taras (Taranto, Italy) mint, magistrates Zo…, Neyme…, & Poly…, c. 280-272 B.C.; obverse nude youth on horseback right crowning horse with wreath; magistrates' names ZΩ above and NEY/MH in two lines below; reverse Taras (or Phalanthos) astride dolphin left, nude, legs crossed, helmet in extended right hand, stars flanking before and behind, magistrates name ΠOΛY above right, TAPAΣ below; ex Goldberg auction 96, lot 1498; SOLD


Taras, Calabria, Italy, c. 272 - 240 B.C.

|Italy|, |Taras,| |Calabria,| |Italy,| |c.| |272| |-| |240| |B.C.||nomos|
Taras, the only Spartan colony, was founded in 706 B.C. The founders were Partheniae ("sons of virgins"), sons of unmarried Spartan women and Perioeci (free men, but not citizens of Sparta). These out-of-wedlock unions were permitted to increase the prospective number of soldiers (only the citizens could be soldiers) during the bloody Messenian wars. Later, however, when they were no longer needed, their citizenship was retroactively nul|lified and the sons were obliged to leave Greece forever. Their leader, Phalanthus, consulted the oracle at Delphi and was told to make the harbor of Taranto their home. They named the city Taras after the son of Poseidon, and of a local nymph, Satyrion. The reverse depicts Taras being saved from a shipwreck by a dolphin sent to him by Poseidon. This symbol of the ancient Greek city is still the symbol of modern Taranto today.
SH75331. Silver nomos, SNG Cop 927, Vlasto 890, HN Italy 1037, gVF, fine style, well centered on a tight flan, toned, some marks, scratches, and light corrosion, weight 6.332 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, Taras (Taranto, Italy) mint, c. 272 - 240 B.C.; obverse |−HPAK/ΛHTOΣ below, helmeted and cuirassed warrior on horseback right, shield on his back, transverse spear downward in right hand; reverse TAPAΣ, Phalanthos on dolphin left, flower in extended right hand, cornucopia in left hand, EΓ monogram and thymiaterion (incense burner) behind; SOLD


Taras, Calabria, Italy, c. 281 - 272 B.C.

|Italy|, |Taras,| |Calabria,| |Italy,| |c.| |281| |-| |272| |B.C.||nomos|
Taras, the only Spartan colony, was founded in 706 B.C. The founders were Partheniae ("sons of virgins"), sons of unmarried Spartan women and Perioeci (free men, but not citizens of Sparta). These out-of-wedlock unions were permitted to increase the prospective number of soldiers (only the citizens could be soldiers) during the bloody Messenian wars. Later, however, when they were no longer needed, their citizenship was retroactively nu|llified and the sons were obliged to leave Greece forever. Their leader, Phalanthus, consulted the oracle at Delphi and was told to make the harbor of Taranto their home. They named the city Taras after the son of Poseidon, and of a local nymph, Satyrion. According to legend, Phalanthos was rescued by a dolphin after a shipwreck near Delphi. Some descriptions of this and similar coin types identify the dolphin rider as Phalanthos. But Aristotle wrote that it was Taras, not Phalanthos, who was saved by a dolphin. This symbol of the ancient Greek city is still the symbol of modern Taranto today.
GS85154. Silver nomos, Vlasto 702; SNG ANS 1077; HN Italy 969; BMC Italy p. 194, 255; SNG Cop -, EF, fine style, iridescent toning, well centered and struck on a tight flan, some die wear, weight 7.816 g, maximum diameter 21.9 mm, die axis 315o, Taras (Taranto, Italy) mint, c. 281 - 272 B.C.; obverse naked horseman dismounting from horse galloping to left, shield in left hand, EY (magistrate) upper right, NIKΩN (magistrate) below; reverse Taras (or Phalanthos) astride dolphin left, stalk of barley in extended right hand, left hand resting on dolphin's back, API (magistrate) left, TAPAΣ curving downward behind, arrowhead (or spearhead?) right below; ex Art of Money (Portland, OR); SOLD


Amisos, Pontos, 85 - 65 B.C.

|Pontos|, |Amisos,| |Pontos,| |85| |-| |65| |B.C.||AE| |21|
Amisos, the mythical home of the Amazons, was settled c. 760 - 750 B.C. by people from Miletus, who established a flourishing trade relationship with the ancient peoples of Anatolia. Amisos came under the rule of the Persian Empire, Alexander the Great's Macedonian Empire, and then the Kingdom of Pontus. The Romans took control in 47 B.C. and Amisos remained within the Byzantine Empire until it was captured by the Seljuks in 1200, to be later taken over by the Ilhanlilar. Amisos today is Samsun, a city of about half a million people on the north coast of Turkey.
SH73961. Bronze AE 21, SNG Cop 165; SNGvA 66; SNG BM 1218; SNG Stancomb 704; Rec Gen p. 56, 38; HGC 7 244; Laffaille -, VF, green patina, earthen encrustations, weight 7.574 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 0o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, Mithridatic War issue, 85 - 65 B.C.; obverse head of Amazon right, wearing wolf scalp headdress; reverse Nike walking right, extending wreath in right hand, palm frond over shoulder in left, AMI−ΣOY horizontal divided across field; scarce; SOLD


Larissa, Thessaly, Greece, c. 440 - 380 B.C.

|Thessaly|, |Larissa,| |Thessaly,| |Greece,| |c.| |440| |-| |380| |B.C.||drachm|
During religious games, the young men of Thessaly participated in bull jumping and bull wrestling. In bull wrestling, participants would jump from a horse, naked save a chlamys (cloak) and petasos (hat), to bring a bull down to the ground. The obverse shows a wrestler bringing down a bull and the reverse shows the horse running free after the leap was made. The game may have originated in Asia Minor and then traveled to Crete, where it is known the people of Thessaly learned the sport.
SH71316. Silver drachm, BCD Thessaly II 172 (same obverse die, horse left) / 372.1 (same rev die); cf. SNG Fitzwilliam 2394; SNG Cop 107, VF, fine style, weight 5.795 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 270o, Larissa mint, c. 440 - 380 B.C.; obverse hero Thessalos restraining bull, both right, holding band around its head, nude but for billowing chlamys tied around his neck, petasos flying loose in the air behind him; reverse horse running right, trailing rein, ΛAPI/ΣAIA above and below, all within shallow incuse square; ; scarce; SOLD


Skione, Macedonia, Greece, c. 480 - 470 B.C.

|Other| |Macedonia|, |Skione,| |Macedonia,| |Greece,| |c.| |480| |-| |470| |B.C.||tetrobol|
The apotropaic eye was painted on Greek drinking vessels to ward off evil spirits while drinking. Fishing boats in some parts of the Mediterranean still have stylized eyes painted on the bows. This coin would have served both as currency and as a talisman to ward off evil.
SH88327. Silver tetrobol, SNG ANS 706 (same dies?), HGC 3.1 671 (R2), BMC Macedonia -, SNG Cop -, AMNG III.2 -, VF, well centered, toned, marks, porosity, weight 2.115 g, maximum diameter 11.3 mm, die axis 270o, Skione mint, c. 480 - 470 B.C.; obverse youthful male head left (hero Protesilaos?); reverse Σ−K−I−O, apotropaic human eye in incuse square; ex Frascatius Ancient Coins (2010); very rare; SOLD


Kyzikos, Mysia, c. 253 - 270 A.D.

|Cyzicus|, |Kyzikos,| |Mysia,| |c.| |253| |-| |270| |A.D.||AE| |25|
Colossal foundations of the Temple of Hadrian are still visible at Cyzicus. The columns were 21.35 meters high (about 70 feet), the highest known in the Roman Empire. Those at Baalbek in Syria, the next highest, are only 19.35 meters (about 63 feet).
GB72637. Bronze AE 25, Von Fritze X, group V, 55; see Price-Trell fig. 199; BMC Mysia -; SNG BnF -; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; SNG Tüb -; Lindgren -, VF, weight 8.517 g, maximum diameter 24.6 mm, die axis 45o, Kyzikos (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, strategos Lok. Severus, c. 253 - 270 A.D.; obverse KY-ZIKOC, beardless, diademed head of the hero Kyzikos (mythical founder of the city) right; reverse LOK CEBHPOY KYZIKH,NΩN ending in the field above, two temples; on left: Sanctuary of Demeter, round masonry building with closed doors high on wall with no steps, three standing female figures holding torches on top, flanked by two flaming serpent entwined torches; on right: the Temple of Hadrian, an octastyle temple, with acroteria and annulet in pediment; ∆IC NEOKO/PΩN in exergue; ex Roger Liles Collection; extremely rare; SOLD


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D., Acmonea, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Marcus| |Aurelius,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |17| |March| |180| |A.D.,| |Acmonea,| |Phrygia||AE| |19|
Akmonia (Acmonea) was an important city of central Phrygia, located on a tributary of the river Senaros. Akmon was the founder of Akmonia, the first king of the region, and the father of Mygdon. His son Mygdon led a force of Phrygians against the Amazons, alongside Otreus (another Phrygian leader) and King Priam of Troy, one generation before the Trojan War. Priam mentions this to Helen of Troy in Book 3 of The Iliad.
RP92644. Bronze AE 19, RPC online IV.2 T1659 (14 spec.), SNG Cop 33, SNGvA 8314, SNG Tire 504, BMC Phrygia 59 - 60, Waddington 5501, Choice F, well centered, highlighting earthen deposits, light cleaning scratches, weight 4.689 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 90o, Akmonia (Ahat Koyu, Turkey) mint, magistrate Tundianos; obverse AV KAI - ANTΩNEINOC - CE, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse EΠI TVN-∆IA-NOV, youthful hero Akmon on horse galloping right, head bear, cloak flying behind, spear in right hand, reins in left hand, AKMONE/ΩN in two lines in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; SOLD


Larissa, Thessaly, Greece, c. 450 - 400 B.C.

|Thessaly|, |Larissa,| |Thessaly,| |Greece,| |c.| |450| |-| |400| |B.C.||drachm|
During religious games, the young men of Thessaly participated in bull jumping and bull wrestling. In bull wrestling, participants would jump from a horse, naked save a chlamys (cloak) and petasos (hat), to bring a bull down to the ground. The obverse shows a wrestler bringing down a bull and the reverse shows the horse running free after the leap was made. The game may have originated in Asia Minor and then traveled to Crete, where it is known the people of Thessaly learned the sport.
GS73408. Silver drachm, Lorber Thessalian 50, SNG Cop 110, BCD Thessaly I 1128, BCD Thessaly II 175, HGC 4 420 (S), F, etched surfaces, porous, weight 5.509 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 0o, Larissa mint, c. 450 - 400 B.C.; obverse hero Thessalos restraining bull, both left, holding band around its head, nude but for billowing chlamys tied around his neck, petasos tied around neck flying behind; reverse bridled horse running right, trailing rein, ΛAPI/ΣAIA in two lines above and below, all within shallow incuse square; ex BCD Collection with his tag noting, "Ex. Sotheby's 7 March 96, lot 252 (part), the lot of 9 AR + 49 AE for £550 +%."; scarce; SOLD




  




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