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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Military| ▸ |Arms & Armor||View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Coins Featuring Arms and Armor
Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Kition, Cyprus

|Cyprus|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |the| |Great,| |336| |-| |323| |B.C.,| |Kition,| |Cyprus||unit|
The "arrow" on this coin is very unusual. The description of Price 3119 includes a KT monogram but followed by (?). The monogram is missing from all examples known to Forum. We suspect the KT monogram does not exist on any Alexander bronze from Kition.
GB95811. Bronze unit, cf. Tziambazis 6, Price 3119, Bank of Cyprus --, gVF, nice green patina with buff earthen highlighting, light marks, porosity, tight flan, weight 4.731 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, die axis 225o, Kition (Larnaca, Cyprus) mint, 336 - 323 B.C. (perhaps later); obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse club right above, AΛEΞAN∆POY across center, open-mouth quiver, arrow(?) and bow below; $200.00 (€184.00)
 


Thessalian League, Thessaly, Greece, c. 170 B.C.

|Thessaly|, |Thessalian| |League,| |Thessaly,| |Greece,| |c.| |170| |B.C.||chalkous|
The object on the reverse was long considered somewhat mysterious. Roger identified it as a lyre. Robinson suggested a diadem or more probably a sling. Warren argued it is a stylized depiction of a dart sling, or Kestrosphendone, a weapon first introduced during the Third Macedonian War between Rome and Perseus of Macedon. Warren suggests this type was struck at Demetrias in Magnesia, under orders from Perseus, to commemorate the success of the weapon.
GB96459. Bronze chalkous, Warren, "Two Notes," NC 1961, pl. I, 11; BCD Thessaly II 24.2; HGC 4 236; Rogers 4 var., gVF, well centered, nice green patina, light earthen deposits, marks, weight 3.065 g, maximum diameter 14.8 mm, Magnesia, Demetrias (near Volos, Greece) mint, c. 170 B.C.; obverse Macedonian round shield, pellets and five double arcs/crescents around star in central boss; reverse kestrosphendone (dart sling) with dart inside, ΘEΣΣA/ΛΩN divided in two lines, the first above, ending below; ex David Wray Collection, ex John Jencek; very rare; $200.00 (€184.00)
 


Mesembria, Thrace, c. 450 - 350 B.C.

|Mesembria|, |Mesembria,| |Thrace,| |c.| |450| |-| |350| |B.C.||diobol|NEW
(sampi) was an archaic Greek letter used between the 7th and the middle of the 5th centuries B.C., probably to denote some type of a sibilant (hissing) ΣΣ or TΣ sound, and was abandoned when the sound disappeared from Greek. The name sampi is of medieval origin. The letter's original name in antiquity is not known. Its use has been attested at the Ionian cities Miletus, Ephesos, Halikarnassos, Erythrae, and Teos, at the Ionian colony of Massalia in Gaul, on the island of Samos, and at Kyzikos, Mysia. At Mesembria, on the Black Sea coast of Thrace, it was used on coins in an abbreviation of the city's name, spelled META. In a famous painted black figure amphora from c. 615 B.C., known as the "Nessos amphora," the inscribed name of the eponymous centaur Nessus is rendered in the irregular spelling NETOΣ.
GS97447. Silver diobol, SNG BM 268 ff., SNG Cop 653, SGCV I 1673, gVF, obverse a little off center, tiny edge split, weight 1.238 g, maximum diameter 11.8 mm, die axis 0o, Mesambria (Nesebar, Bulgaria) mint, c. 450 - 350 B.C.; obverse crested Corinthian officer's helmet facing; reverse M-E-T-A (T = archaic Greek letter sampi = ΣΣ) counterclockwise, in the four quarters of a radiate wheel (solar disk?); $140.00 (€128.80)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Kition, Cyprus

|Cyprus|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |the| |Great,| |336| |-| |323| |B.C.,| |Kition,| |Cyprus||quarter| |unit|
Kition, also known by its Latin name Citium, was a city-kingdom on the southern coast of Cyprus (present-day Larnaca). According to local tradition, it was established in the 13th century B.C. by Greek (Achaean) settlers, after the Trojan war. Its most famous resident was Zeno of Citium, born c. 334 B.C. in Citium and founder of the Stoic school of philosophy which he taught in Athens from about 300 B.C.
GB95835. Bronze quarter unit, Price 3111A, cf. Tziambazis 6 (full unit), BMC Cyprus -, VF, well centered, earthen deposits, porosity, weight 1.743 g, maximum diameter 11.1 mm, die axis 0o, Kition (Larnaca, Cyprus) mint, c. 325 - 320 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse bow left and upright quiver on left, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward in center, knobby club handle up on right; very rare; $120.00 (€110.40)
 


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D.

|Commodus|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.||denarius|NEW
In 175, Commodus, son of Marcus Aurelius and his wife Faustina, was made caesar. This coin was dedicated to the new caesar, the "Prince of Youth."
RS97089. Silver denarius, RIC III MA603, RSC II 608, BMCRE IV MA639, SRCV II 5540, Hunter II 3 var. (draped bust), aVF, well centered, light scratches, edge cracks, weight 3.058 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, as caesar, 175 A.D.; obverse COMMODO CAES AVG FIL GERM, youth's bare head right; reverse PRINC IVVENT (Prince of Youth), Commodus standing slightly left, head left, wearing short tunic and chlamys, branch downward in right hand, inverted spear vertical behind in left hand, trophy of captured arms with round shield and arms at base; $110.00 (€101.20)
 


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VII Euergetes Sidetes, 138 - 129 B.C., Ascalon, Philistia

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |VII| |Euergetes| |Sidetes,| |138| |-| |129| |B.C.,| |Ascalon,| |Philistia||AE| |13|
Askalon lies on the shore of the Mediterranean, ten miles north of Gaza and about 40 miles south of Joppa. Herod the Great ruled all of Palestine, except Askalon, which remained a free city. Today, a national park at Ashqelon, Israel includes ruins of Canaanite, Greek, Roman, Byzantine and Crusader walls and buildings.
JD97435. Bronze AE 13, Houghton-Lorber II 2122; Brett Ascalon 10; SNG Spaer 2095; Houghton CSE 818, F, porous, scratches, earthen deposits, off center, weight 1.419 g, maximum diameter 13.3 mm, die axis 0o, Askalon (Ashqelon, Israel) mint, 138 - 129 B.C.; obverse crested Macedonian helmet with cheek-pieces right, dot border; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY, apluster vertical (ship's stern ornament); $105.00 (€96.60)
 


Termessos Major, Pisidia, 3rd Century A.D.

|Pisidia|, |Termessos| |Major,| |Pisidia,| |3rd| |Century| |A.D.||AE| |38|
Alexander the Great likened Termessos, high in the Taurus Mountains, to an eagle's nest after he surrounded it but failed to conquer it in 333 B.C. An ally of Rome, Termessos was granted independent status by the Roman Senate in 71 B.C. Independence was maintained continuously for a long time, the only exception being an alliance with Amyntas king of Galatia (reigned 36 - 25 B.C.). This independence is documented also by the coins of Termessos, which bear the title "Autonomous." Termessos was abandoned after its aqueduct was destroyed by an earthquake (date unknown).
GB83542. Bronze AE 38, SNGvA 5364; BMC Lycia p. 273, 41; SNG BnF -; SNG Cop -; SNG PfPs -; SNG Righetti -; SNG Tüb -, aVF, green patina, rough, pitting, corrosion, smoothing, edge chip, central cavities, weight 28.152 g, maximum diameter 37.8 mm, die axis 0o, Termessos Major mint, pseudo-autonomous, c. 238 - 268 A.D.; obverse TEPMHCCEΩN AVTONOMΩN, laureate and bearded head of Zeus right; reverse TΩN MEIZONΩN, Athena standing slightly left, head left, wearing helmet, long chiton, and peplos, holding Nike offering wreath in right hand, spear in left hand, shield at feet on far side of right leg, trophy of captured arms behind, Θ left; about twice the weight of the similar smaller and less rare coin with the same types (SNG BnF 2189, AE33, 14.06g); very rare; $100.00 (€92.00)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonos II Gonatas, 277 - 239 B.C.

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Antigonos| |II| |Gonatas,| |277| |-| |239| |B.C.||AE| |17|NEW
Antigonus was cunning, patient and persistent, preferring political rather than military solutions. In contrast to his father Demetrius and neighbor Pyrrhus, who aimed higher and fell lower, Antigonus achieved a measure of mediocre security. He cultivated the arts, gathering distinguished philosophers, poets, and historians, and he gained the affection of his subjects by his honesty.
GB93467. Bronze AE 17, cf. SNG Alpha Bank 1007 ff., SNG Cop 1222 ff., SNG Munchen 1118, HGC 7.1 1048 (S) (none with the both controls matching), aVF, bumps, corrosion, earthen deposits, weight 4.397 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 0o, Macedonia, Pella(?) mint, 277 - 239 B.C.; obverse Macedonian shield, ANTI monogram in center, seven double crescents around; reverse crested Macedonian officer's helmet facing, monograms (controls) at sides flanking crest, BA−ΣI flanking cheek pieces; scarce; $80.00 (€73.60)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Miletos, Ionia, c. 323 - 315 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

|Alexander| |the| |Great|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Miletos,| |Ionia,| |c.| |323| |-| |315| |B.C.,| |In| |the| |Name| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great||half| |unit|NEW
Struck by Nikokreon of Salamis in the name of King Alexander the Great. Salamis was a maritime town on the east coast of Cyprus, at the end of a fertile plain between two mountains, near the River Pediaeus. Nikokreon, the king of Salamis, along with the other princes of Cyprus, submitted to Alexander without opposition in 331 B.C. To pay homage, Nikokreon visited Alexander at Tyre where he distinguished himself by furnishing magnificence theatrical exhibitions for the Emperor. In the war between Antigonos and Ptolemy in 315 B.C., Nikokreon supported the latter and was rewarded by being placed in control of all Cyprus.
GB93466. Bronze half unit, Price 2069, Liampi Chronologie 223-229, SNG Cop 1128, Müller Alexander -, VF, rough, corrosion, weight 3.545 g, maximum diameter 15.8 mm, die axis 0o, Miletos (near Balat, Turkey) mint, c. 323 - 315 B.C.; obverse Macedonian shield, facing head of Medusa (gorgoneion) in center, five double crescents and five groups of five pellets alternating around; reverse crested Macedonian officer's helmet facing, flanked by B - A (BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY - King Alexander), and M (controls) below; scarce; $70.00 (€64.40)
 


Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C.

|Kingdom| |of| |Thrace|, |Kingdom| |of| |Thrace,| |Lysimachos,| |305| |-| |281| |B.C.||AE| |20|
Athena is the Greek goddess of wisdom, courage, inspiration, civilization, law and justice, strategic warfare, mathematics, strength, strategy, the arts, crafts, and skill. She was believed to lead soldiers into battle as the war goddess Athena Promachos. The Parthenon on the Athenian Acropolis was dedicated to her, along with numerous other temples and monuments across Europe, West Asia, and North Africa. Her usual attribute is the owl and Nike is her frequent companion.
GB87740. Bronze AE 20, SNG Cop 1164, Lindgren I 908, Müller 13, HGC 3.2 1755 (S), VF, nice glossy green patina, bumps and scratches, small edge split, weight 4.968 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain W. Anatolian mint, 301 - 281 B.C.; obverse male head right, wearing Phrygian helmet; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΛYΣIMAXOY, trophy of captured arms, arranged to resemble Athena Parthenos standing left, with helmet, shield, and spear; scarce; $65.00 (€59.80)
 




  



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