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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Featured Collections| ▸ |Errett Bishop Collection||View Options:  |  |  |   

The Errett Bishop Collection

Errett Albert Bishop (July 14, 1928 - April 14, 1983) was an American mathematician known for his work on analysis and a professor at the University of California at San Diego. He expanded constructive analysis in his 1967 Foundations of Constructive Analysis, where he proved most of the important theorems in real analysis by constructive methods. (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Errett_Bishop).

He was also a great father and a fun-loving guy who would take his family biking, surfing, snorkeling, camping, etc. He enjoyed going to auctions, where he would often pick up an interesting artifact or a piece of art. Errett's son, Edward, in the photograph with his father on the right, describes his childhood home as half junk-yard, half museum. Errett especially loved ancient coins, and he was one of the founding members of the Ancient Coin Club in San Diego.

The Errett Bishop Collection includes over 1000 Ancient Greek, Roman Republic, Roman imperial, Roman provincial, Celtic, Judaean, Byzantine and other ancient coins collected from about 1960 to 1982. The collection includes 136 coins from Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt. The variety of types and the range from inexpensive to beautiful showcase coins means there are coins in this collection for almost every collection and every budget. Due to the size of the collection, it will be some time before they are all added to the shop. Keep looking here or in our recent additions to see them as we add them.

Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Apollonia Salbace, Caria

|Other| |Caria|, |Severus| |Alexander,| |13| |March| |222| |-| |March| |235| |A.D.,| |Apollonia| |Salbace,| |Caria||AE| |30|
This coin is an obverse die match to a coin struck by the neighboring city, Alabanda, Caria, SNG Mnchen 464, RPC Online VI T5384. Dies shared by more than one city in the region were first discovered by Konrad Kraft in 1972. Groups of smaller cities in Anatolia shared traveling mints, which would sometimes use the same obverse dies for more than one city.
RP92646. Bronze AE 30, Apparently unpublished; RPC Online -, SNG BnF -, SNGvA -, SNG Cop -, BMC Caria -, F, porous, turquoise and earthen adhesions, reverse flatly struck, weight 11.787 g, maximum diameter 29.7 mm, die axis 180o, Apollonia Salbace (Edremit, Turkey) mint, 13 Mar 222 - Mar 235 A.D.; obverse AYT K M AYP CEY AΛEΞAN∆PO-C, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse CTPA AΓAΘEINOY TOY IH AΠOΛΛΩNIATΩN (strategos Agathinos, son of Hie.(?), Apollonia), Zeus standing slightly left, head left, wearing himation and chlamys, eagle in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection; extremely rare, this is the only specimen of the type known to FORVM; $250.00 SALE PRICE $225.00


Macrinus, 11 April 217 - 8 June 218 A.D.

|Macrinus|, |Macrinus,| |11| |April| |217| |-| |8| |June| |218| |A.D.||sestertius|
Macrinus was Praetorian Prefect for Caracalla but arranged Caracalla's assassination and seized power. He and his son were accepted by the senate. The Syrian legions, inspired by Julia Maesa, Caracalla's aunt, revolted after he concluded an unfavorable peace with the Persians. He was defeated and executed.
SL92493. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 121 (S), BMCRE V 113, Cohen IV 79, SRCV II 7391, Hunter III -, NGC F, strike 4/5, surface 1/5, scratches (577028-007), weight 19.150 g, maximum diameter 30.7 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 11 Apr 217 - 31 Dec 217 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES M OPEL SEV MACRINVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse PONTIF MAX TR P P P (high priest, holder of Tribunitian power, father of the country), Felicitas standing facing, head left, long caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, drapery over left arm, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field below center; from the Errett Bishop Collection; NGC| Lookup; $230.00 SALE PRICE $207.00


Byzantine Empire, Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine, 23 January 613 - 11 January 641 A.D.

|Heraclius|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Heraclius| |and| |Heraclius| |Constantine,| |23| |January| |613| |-| |11| |January| |641| |A.D.||decanummium|
Heraclius offered peace to Khusro, presumably in 624, threatening otherwise to invade Persia, but Khusro rejected the offer. Heraclius marched into Persia with an army of probably less than 25,000 men, willingly abandoning any attempt to secure his rear or maintain lines of communication. Heraclius fought brilliantly and bravely repeatedly defeated the Persian forces. When the war ended in 628, Khusro had been murdered by his own men, the Byzantines regained all their lost territories, their captured soldiers, a war indemnity, and most importantly for them, the True Cross and other relics that were lost in Jerusalem in 614.
BZ93528. Bronze decanummium, Anastasi 61, DOC II-1 256 (not in collection), Ricotti 32 bis, Sommer 11.117, SBCV 886, Hahn MIB 241, Wroth -, Morrisson BnF -, Ratto -, Tolstoi -, VF, nicely centered reverse, green patina, weight 3.494 g, maximum diameter 14.9 mm, die axis 180o, Sicily, Catania mint, 624 - 625 A.D.; obverse facing busts of Heraclius on left, bearded, and Heraclius Constantine on right, beardless; both crowned, draped and cuirassed; cross between their heads; reverse large I (10 nummi), A/N/N/O (year) in column left, X/V (15) in two lines right, CAT in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $160.00 SALE PRICE $144.00


Parthian Empire, Phraates IV, c. 38 - 2 B.C.

|Parthian| |Empire|, |Parthian| |Empire,| |Phraates| |IV,| |c.| |38| |-| |2| |B.C.||tetradrachm|
Soon after Phraates IV was designated the successor to the throne, he murdered his father and all his thirty brothers. In 36 B.C. he was defeated by Mark Antony and lost most of his army, however, Antony had to abandon his conquests to fight Octavian. Tiridates temporarily usurped the throne in 32 B.C., but Phraates soon defeated him. In 20 B.C., Phraates made peace with Rome. He returned the prisoners and eagles taken from Crassus and Armenia was recognized as a Roman dependency. Augustus gave Phraates an Italian concubine, Musa, whom he made his favored wife. She persuaded him to designate their son Phraataces as his successor and to send his other sons to Rome as hostages. With all rivals out of the way, Musa and Phraataces poisoned the king and took the throne as co-rulers.
GS96027. Silver tetradrachm, cf. Sellwood 52.1 - 9; Sunrise 391; Shore 273 - 274; SNG Cop 119; BMC Parthia p. 105, 35 ff.; Cohen DCA 612, VF, as found dark hoard patina, edge chip, graffito obv. left, weight 10.783 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 0o, Seleukeia on the Tigris (south of Baghdad, Iraq) mint, c. 38 - 2 B.C.; obverse diademed and cuirassed bust left, with royal wart on forehead, beard with somewhat square cut end, hair in four formal rows of curls, plain spiral torque; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ / BAΣIΛEΩN − APΣAKOY / EYEPΓETOY − ∆IKAIOY − EΠIΦANOYΣ / ΦIΛEΛΛHNOΣ squared seven line legend around, Phraates seated right, wearing tunic and trousers, Athena standing left before him, wearing helmet and chiton, she offers a filleted wreath with her extended right hand, scepter in left hand, date in exergue unstruck or partially off flan; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


Byzantine Anonymous Follis of Christ, Class A2, Basil II & Constantine VIII, 976 - 1025 A.D.

|Anonymous| |Folles|, |Byzantine| |Anonymous| |Follis| |of| |Christ,| |Class| |A2,| |Basil| |II| |&| |Constantine| |VIII,| |976| |-| |1025| |A.D.||anonymous| |follis|NEW
This is a new ornaments variety, which we have just added to NumisWiki. It is a variation of Grierson 30, but this coin has two pellets vice three in each arm of the nimbus cruciger and this coin has a pellet in square on the book vice and ordinary pellet. Both this coin and BZ93547, received together from the Errett Bishop Collection, share this ornaments variety.
BZ93549. Bronze anonymous follis, Anonymous follis of Christ class A2; Grierson-NumisWiki ornaments 30b; DOC III-2 A2.16a; SBCV 1813; Sommer 40.2.1, aVF, areas unstruck, weight 14.249 g, maximum diameter 32.86 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 976 - 1025 AD; obverse + EMMANOVHΛ (romanized Hebrew - God is with us), facing bust of Christ, wears nimbus cruciger ornamented with two pellets in each limb of cross, pallium, and colobium, Gospels in both hands, IC - XC (Greek abbreviation: Ihsos Xrists - Jesus Christ) across field; reverse IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE (Greek: Jesus Christ King of Kings), ornaments above and below inscription; from the Errett Bishop Collection; new previously unknown ornaments variety; rare; $140.00 SALE PRICE $126.00


Parthian Empire, Phraates IV, c. 38 - 2 B.C.

|Parthian| |Empire|, |Parthian| |Empire,| |Phraates| |IV,| |c.| |38| |-| |2| |B.C.||tetradrachm|
Soon after Phraates IV was designated the successor to the throne, he murdered his father and all of his thirty brothers. In 36 B.C. he was defeated by Mark Antony and lost most of his army, however, Antony had to abandon his conquests to fight Octavian. Tiridates temporarily usurped the throne in 32 B.C., but Phraates soon defeated him. In 20 B.C., Phraates made peace with Rome. He returned the prisoners and eagles taken from Crassus and Armenia was recognized as a Roman dependency. Augustus gave Phraates an Italian concubine, Musa, whom he made his favored wife. She persuaded him to designate their son Phraataces as his successor and to send his other sons to Rome as hostages. With all rivals out of the way, Musa and Phraataces poisoned the king and took the throne as co-rulers.
GS96025. Silver tetradrachm, cf. Sellwood 51, Cohen DCA 611, Shore 272, Sunrise 388, SNG Cop - (various dates), aVF, toned, porous, scratches, weight 10.931 g, maximum diameter 28.2 mm, die axis 0o, Seleukeia on the Tigris (south of Baghdad, Iraq) mint, c. 26 - 23 B.C.; obverse diademed bust left, wearing ornate robes, wart on forehead, long beard with flat end, hair in four formal rows, spiral neck torque ends in a horse forepart; reverse BACIΛEΩC / BACIΛEΩN − ΛPΣAKOY / EYEIΓETOY − ∆IKAIOY − EΠIΦΛNOYΣ / ΦIΛEΛΛHNOΣ in seven line square around, king enthroned right, wearing tunic and trousers, Tyche standing left before him, wearing kalathos, chiton and peplos, offering palm frond with right hand, cornucopia in left hand, tiny Seleukid Era year (ZΠC?) under seat of throne, uncertain Parthian month in exergue (mostly off flan); from the Errett Bishop Collection; $140.00 SALE PRICE $126.00


Parthian Empire, Pakoros I, c. 78 - 120 A.D.

|Parthian| |Empire|, |Parthian| |Empire,| |Pakoros| |I,| |c.| |78| |-| |120| |A.D.||drachm|
Traditionally this king has been called Pakoros II (or Pacorus II); however, the latest research indicates there was only one Parthian king named Pakoros. Beardless portraits on his earliest coins indicate Pakoros began his rule very young. After many years of civil war with many rivals, including Vologases II, Artabanus III and others, Pakoros eventually reclaimed the whole of the empire. According to Cassius Dio, he sold the kingdom of Osroene to Abgar VII, and according to Ammianus Marcellinus he enlarged the Parthian capital Ctesiphon and built its walls. He maintained close contact with the Dacian ruler Decebalus. In 101, Pacorus sent an embassy to the Han Dynasty of China. He disappeared from coinage around 105 A.D.

Although the reverse legend bears little resemblance to the original Greek, the barbaric letter forms and spellings on Pakoros I types are remarkably consistent.
GS96043. Silver drachm, Sellwood 78.3 (Vologases III), Shore 413 (Vologases III), BMC Parthia p. 187, 72 (Vologases I), SNG Cop 195 (Vologases I), Sunrise -, gVF, light toning, flow lines, oval flan, small edge split, weight 3.737 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, Ecbatana (Hamedan, Iran) mint, c. 95 - 120 A.D.; obverse diademed and draped bust left, long pointed beard, hoop earring visible, no wart, hair in three waves, three diadem bands and three diadem ends; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ / BAΣIΛEΩN − APΣAKOY − ∆IXAIOY / EYEPΓETOY − EΠIΦANOYΣ / ΦIΛEΛΛHNOΣ (blundered), archer (Arsakes I) seated right, bow in extended right hand, cross under legs, (Ecbatana control monogram) below bow, squared seven-line blundered Greek legend around; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $140.00 SALE PRICE $126.00


Parthian Empire, Vologases VI, 208 - 228 A.D.

|Parthian| |Empire|, |Parthian| |Empire,| |Vologases| |VI,| |208| |-| |228| |A.D.||drachm|
Soon after Vologases VI succeeded his father to the throne, his brother Artabanus V rebelled against him and became master of the greater part of the empire. Vologases VI retained a part of Babylonia. Meanwhile, in 224, Ardashir I, the founder of the Sassanid Empire, defeated and killed Artabanus V and conquered the eastern provinces. Over the following years, Ardashir I expanded his new empire, and must have defeated Vologases VI in 228 or 229.
GS96048. Silver drachm, Sellwood 88.18; Shore 455; BMC Parthia p. 243, 20 (Vologases V); Sunrise 459 var. (monogram variant); SNG Cop 246 var. (same, Vologases V), gVF, toned, flow lines, off center, weight 2.983 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 0o, Ecbatana (Hamedan, Iran) mint, 208 - 228 A.D.; obverse bust left with long pointed beard extending past beaded border, wearing tiara with ear flaps, crest of dotted lines, dotted lines to left of line down side, abbreviated king's name in Aramaic lↄ (wz = Wlgy= Vologases) upper right; reverse archer (Arsakes I) seated right on throne, bow in extended right hand, cross under legs, (Ecbatana control monogram) below bow, squared five-line legend around, Aramaic Wlgy MLK' (King Vologases) at the top, the other four lines blundered Greek; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $140.00 SALE PRICE $126.00


Byzantine Anonymous Follis of Christ, Class I, Nicephorus III, 7 January 1078 - 1 April 1081

|Anonymous| |Folles|, |Byzantine| |Anonymous| |Follis| |of| |Christ,| |Class| |I,| |Nicephorus| |III,| |7| |January| |1078| |-| |1| |April| |1081||anonymous| |follis|
The inept rule of Michael VII led to several revolts. Nicephorus seized the capital, was crowned and married Michael's wife, Empress Maria of Alania. To ensure the succession of her son Constantine, Empress Maria conspired with Alexius Comnenus to dispose of Nicephorus. Just as Nicephorus had banished Michael to a monastery, Alexius Comnenus banished Nicephorus to a monastery.
BZ93551. Bronze anonymous follis, Anonymous follis of Christ, DOC III-2, class I; SBCV 1889; Sommer 40.11, VF, overstruck on earlier follis, weight 4.542 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 7 Jan 1078 - 1 Apr 1081; obverse bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cruciger, pallium, and colobium, raising right in benediction, gospels in left, IC - XC (Greek abbreviation: Ihsos Xrists - Jesus Christ) across field; reverse Latin cross with X at center, globule and two pellets at each extremity, floral ornaments in lower fields, crescents in upper fields; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00


Parthian Empire, Sinatrukes I, c. 93 - 69 B.C.

|Parthian| |Empire|, |Parthian| |Empire,| |Sinatrukes| |I,| |c.| |93| |-| |69| |B.C.||drachm|
"Sellwood type 33 coins were originally attributed to Sinatruces by Sellwood (1971) but revised to Gotarzes I by Sellwood (1980). Recent research shows the type likely does belong to Sinatruces. See the article on 'Recent Research on Attributions to Sinatruces' by Dr. G. R. Assar." -- https://www.parthia.com
GS96017. Silver drachm, Sunrise 302, Sellwood 33.4 (Gotarzes I), Shore 113 (same), SNG Cop -, BMC Parthia -, aVF, broad flan, toned, scratches, weight 3.458 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rhagae (Ray, part of Tehran, Iran) mint, c. 93 - 69 B.C.; obverse long-bearded bust left, tiara with central horn ornament within three arches of pearls, crest of recumbent stags with heads upwards, ear flaps, diadem with two ends, ornate robe, spiral torc ends in small round knob; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ − MEΓAΛOY − APΣAKOY − ΘEOΠATPOY / NIKATOPOΣ, beardless archer, seated right on throne, bow in right bow, Greek legend inscription forming square, first three lines clockwise from above, the last two downward on left; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00




  



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A few quotes from Errett Albert Bishop...

"Mathematics is common sense."

"The real numbers, for certain purposes, are too thin. Many beautiful phenomena become fully visible only when the complex numbers are brought to the fore." (Bishop 1967, Ch. 5, Complex Analysis, p. 113)

"The primary concern of mathematics is number, and this means the positive integers...In the words of Kronecker, the positive integers were created by God. Kronecker would have expressed it even better if he had said that the positive integers were created by God for the benefit of man (and other finite beings). Mathematics belongs to man, not to God. We are not interested in properties of the positive integers that have no descriptive meaning for finite man. When a man proves a positive integer to exist, he should show how to find it. If God has mathematics of his own that needs to be done, let him do it himself." (Bishop 1967, Ch. 1, A Constructivist Manifesto, p. 2)


Errett Bishop, Jane Bishop and Rover are in the photograph right.

Catalog current as of Monday, July 4, 2022.
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