Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Hanukkah Sameach!!! 20%+ Off Sale in the Shop Now!!! Tell them you want a coin from FORVM for Hanukkah!!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Ho Ho Ho Merry Christmas!!! 20%+ Off Sale in the Shop Now!!! Internet Challenged? We Are Happy To Take Your Order Over The Phone 252-646-1958

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
New & Reduced


Show Empty Categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
My FORVM
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
zoom.asp
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Imperators| ▸ |Marc Antony||View Options:  |  |  | 

Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C.

Mark Antony was military commander for Julius Caesar during his conquest of Gaul and administrator of Italy while Caesar eliminated his opponents in Greece, Africa, and Spain. After Caesar's assassination in 44 B.C., Antony joined Lepidus and Caesar's adoptive son Octavian in a three-man dictatorship known as the Second Triumvirate. They defeated Caesar's murderers, the Liberatores, at the Battle of Philippi in 42 B.C. and divided the Republic among themselves. Antony took the east, including Egypt, ruled by Queen Cleopatra, and command of Rome's war against Parthia. Relations within the Triumvirate were strained but civil war was averted when Antony married Octavian's sister Octavia. Despite the marriage, Antony continued his affair with Cleopatra and even married her. The Triumvirate broke up in 33 B.C. and erupted into civil war in 31 B.C. At Octavian's direction, the Roman Senate declared war on Cleopatra and proclaimed Antony a traitor. Octavian defeated Antony at the Battle of Actium the same year. Defeated, Antony and Cleopatra fled back to Egypt where they committed suicide. With Antony dead, Octavian was the undisputed master of the Roman world and would reign as the first Roman emperor with the title Augustus.

Roman Republic, Mark Antony, April 43 B.C., Julius Caesar Reverse

|Marc| |Antony|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Mark| |Antony,| |April| |43| |B.C.,| |Julius| |Caesar| |Reverse||denarius|
In April 43 B.C., The Battle of Forum Gallorum and the Battle of Mutina were fought between the forces of Mark Antony and legions loyal to the Roman Senate under the command of the Consuls and Caesar Octavian (the future emperor Augustus). The battles ended without a clear victor, but both consuls were killed. Caesar Octavian was left alone at the helm of the Senate's legions. In October 43 B.C., Mark Antony and Caesar Octavian, together with Lepidus united to form the Second Triumvirate.
SL113450. Silver denarius, Crawford 488/1, Sydenham 1165 (very scarce), BMCRR Gaul 53, Sear CRI 118, RSC I Julius Caesar and Mark Antony 2, SRCV I 1464, NGC VG, strike 3/5, surface 3/5 (2400516-005), weight 3.47 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 225o, Cisalpine Gaul mint, April 43 B.C.; obverse M ANTON IMP (NT ligate), bare head of Antony right, lituus behind; reverse CAES DIC, wreathed head of Julius Caesar right, jug behind; from a Virginia Collector, ex Eastern Numismatics Inc. (Garden City, NY, 27 Apr 2011, $1895); NGC| Lookup; very scarce; $1900.00 SALE PRICE $1710.00


Kings of Galatia, Amyntas, 37 - 25 B.C.

|Galatia|, |Kings| |of| |Galatia,| |Amyntas,| |37| |-| |25| |B.C.||AE| |19|
Mark Antony made Amyntas king of Galatia and several adjacent countries in 37 B.C. On this type Artemis often appears to have the features of Antony's wife, the famed Cleopatra VII of Egypt. According to Plutarch, Amyntas was among the adherents of Mark Antony at Actium in 31 B.C. but deserted to Octavian just before the battle. In 25 B.C., Amyntas was killed in an ambush by the widow of a highland prince avenging her husband's execution. Upon his death Galatia became a Roman province.
GB113533. Bronze AE 19, RPC I 3503; SNG BnF 2369; SNG Cop 102; Sear Imperators 815; BMC Galatia p. 3, 14; HGC 7 784 (S), VF, nice glossy green patina, light earthen deposits, rev. a little off center, light scratches, weight 4.906 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 0o, Galatia, Pisidia or Lykaonia, uncertain mint, 37 - 31 B.C.; obverse draped bust of Artemis (with the features of Cleopatra VII) right, bow and quiver to left; reverse stag standing right, BAΣIΛE-ΩΣ above, AMYNTOΣ in exergue; scarce; $350.00 SALE PRICE $280.00


Roman Republic, Second Triumvirate, Mark Antony and Octavian, Spring - Early Summer 41 B.C.

|Marc| |Antony|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Second| |Triumvirate,| |Mark| |Antony| |and| |Octavian,| |Spring| |-| |Early| |Summer| |41| |B.C.||denarius|
AVG in the obverse legend, abbreviates Antony's official position as Augur (not Augustus, a title which did not yet exist). The augur was an official and priest, whose main role was to interpret the will of the gods by studying the flight of birds: whether they are flying in groups or alone, what noises they make as they fly, direction of flight and what kind of birds they are. This was known as "taking the auspices." The ceremony and function of the augur was central to any major undertaking in Roman society, public or private, including matters of war, commerce, and religion. The Roman historian Livy stresses the importance of the augurs: "Who does not know that this city was founded only after taking the auspices; that everything in war and in peace, at home and abroad, was done only after taking the auspices?"

Octavian's "equivalent" position as Pontifex, a priest, is abbreviated PONT in the reverse legend.

The moneyer M. Barbatius was a friend of Julius Caesar. In 41 B.C. he was a quaestor pro praetore to Antony in the East.
SH26590. Silver denarius, Crawford 517/2, Sydenham 1181, BMCRR East 103, Sear CRI 243, RSC I Mark Antony and Augustus 8, SRCV I 1504, Choice gVF, weight 3.780 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 0o, military mint moving with Antony, Ephesus(?) mint, spring - early summer 41 B.C.; obverse M ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M BARBAT Q P (MP and AV ligate), bare head of Antony right; reverse CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C, bare head of Octavian right; scarce; SOLD


Mark Antony and Octavian, 41 B.C., monneyer Lucius Gellius Poplicola

|Marc| |Antony|, |Mark| |Antony| |and| |Octavian,| |41| |B.C.,| |monneyer| |Lucius| |Gellius| |Poplicola||denarius|
After Caesar's assassination, Antony Octavian and Lepidus formed the 2nd Triumvirate, a three-man dictatorship. They defeated Caesar's assassins at Philippi in 42 B.C. and divided the Republic among themselves. Relations were strained but civil war was averted when Antony married Octavian's sister, Octavia. Despite the marriage, Antony continued an affair with Cleopatra and even married her. In 31 B.C., at Octavian's direction, the Roman Senate declared war on Cleopatra and proclaimed Antony a traitor. Octavian defeated Antony at the Battle of Actium the same year. Defeated, Antony and Cleopatra fled back to Egypt where they committed suicide. Octavian was then the undisputed master of the Roman world and would reign as the first Roman emperor with the title Augustus.
SH16770. Silver denarius, SRCV I 1505, Crawford 517/8, RSC I Mark Antony and Augustus 10, VF, lustrous fields, struck slightly flat, weight 3.745 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 315o, Asia Minor, military mint, autumn 41 B.C.; obverse M ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C L GELL Q P, bare head of Antony right, jug behind; reverse CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C, bare head of Octavian right, lituus behind; rare; SOLD


Mark Antony and Octavia, 39 B.C., Ephesos, Ionia

|Cistophori|, |Mark| |Antony| |and| |Octavia,| |39| |B.C.,| |Ephesos,| |Ionia||cistophoric| |tetradrachm|
Triumvir Reipublicae Constituendae, abbreviated on this coin with III VIR R P C, was the title adopted in November of 43 B.C. by the three Caesarian leaders (Mark Antony, Octavian, and Lepidus) when they formed the Second Triumvirate to oppose the tyrannicides Brutus and Cassius.
SH85436. Silver cistophoric tetradrachm, RPC I 2202, Sydenham 1198, Crawford 263, RSC Octavia and M. Antony 3, Sear CRI 263, BMCRR East 135, SRCV I 1513, VF, well centered, toned, weight 12.035 g, maximum diameter 27.3 mm, die axis 0o, Ephesos (near Selçuk, Turkey) mint, summer - autumn 39 B.C.; obverse M ANTONIVS IMP COS DESIG ITER ET TERT, conjoined head of Antony and bust of Octavia right, Antony nearer and wreathed in ivy, Octavia draped; reverse Dionysus standing half left on cista mystica, in his right hand, thyrsus in his left hand, flanked by two interlaced snakes with heads erect, III VIR (triumvir) downward on left, R P C (Reipublicae Constituendae) upward on right; SOLD


Antonia, Daughter of Mark Antony, Wife of Nero Drusus, Mother of Claudius, Grandmother of Caligula

|Antonia|, |Antonia,| |Daughter| |of| |Mark| |Antony,| |Wife| |of| |Nero| |Drusus,| |Mother| |of| |Claudius,| |Grandmother| |of| |Caligula||dupondius|
Antonia was daughter of Marc Antony and Octavia, wife of Nero Claudius Drusus, sister-in-law of Tiberius, mother of Claudius, and grandmother of Caligula. Renowned for her beauty and virtue, Antonia spent her long life revered by the Roman people and enjoyed many honors conferred upon her by her relatives. All her coinage was issued early in the reign of Claudius. She died around 37 A.D., possibly as a result of forced suicide ordered by Caligula.
RP91440. Orichalcum dupondius, RIC I Claudius 92, BMCRE I Claudius 166, Cohen I 6, BnF II Claudius 143, SRCV I 1902, aVF, green patina, centered on a tight flan, corrosion, weight 14.008 g, maximum diameter 28.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 41 - 50 A.D.; obverse ANTONIA AVGVSTA, bare-headed bust right, hair in long plait; reverse TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, Claudius standing left, veiled and togate, simpulum in right, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; SOLD







CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES


REFERENCES|

Babelon, E. Monnaies de la Republique Romaine. (Paris, 1885).
Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Carson, R. Principal Coins of the Romans, Vol. I: The Republic, c. 290-31 BC. (London, 1978).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappťes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 1: Pompey to Domitian. (Paris, 1880).
Crawford, M. Roman Republican Coinage. (Cambridge, 1974).
Grueber, H. Coins of the Roman Republic in The British Museum. (London, 1910).
Russo, R. The RBW Collection of Roman Republican Coins. (Zurich, 2013).
Rutter, N. ed. Historia Numorum. Italy. (London, 2001).
Seaby, H., D. Sear, & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Volume I, The Republic to Augustus. (London, 1989).
Sear, D. The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators 49 - 27 BC. (London, 1998).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. 1, The Republic and the Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Sydenham, E. The Coinage of the Roman Republic. (London, 1952).

Catalog current as of Monday, December 11, 2023.
Page created in 1.376 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity