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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Types| ▸ |Consecration||View Options:  |  |  |   

Consecration Coinage

Lucius Verus, 7 March 161 - February 169 A.D.

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The crematorium depicted is probably that of Antoninus Pius but it may be the one built by Marcus Aurelius. Both were located in Rome's Campus Martius.
RS89843. Silver denarius, RIC III 596b (S), RSC II 58, BMCRE IV 505, Szaivert MIR 18 187, SRCV II 5206, Choice VF, well centered, nice portrait, light toning, flow lines, edge crack, weight 3.240 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, posthumous, struck by Marcus Aurelius, 169 A.D.; obverse DIVVS VERVS, bare head right; reverse CONSECRATIO, pyramidal crematorium of four stories, bottom floor garlanded, door on the second floor, statue of emperor in facing quadriga on top; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 72 (2 Dec 2018), lot 520; scarce; $250.00 (220.00)


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

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Antoninus Pius' funeral ceremonies were described as elaborate but, despite the pyre depicted on this coin, according to his Historia Augusta biography, Antoninus' body (and not his ashes) was buried in Hadrian's mausoleum. After a seven-day interval (justitium) Marcus and Lucius nominated their father for deification. In contrast to their behavior during Antoninus' campaign to deify Hadrian, the senate did not oppose the emperors' wishes. A flamen, or cultic priest, was appointed to minister the cult of the deified Antoninus, now Divus Antoninus. A column was dedicated to Antoninus on the Campus Martius, and the temple he had built in the Forum in 141 to his deified wife Faustina was rededicated to the deified Faustina and the deified Antoninus. It survives as the church of San Lorenzo in Miranda.San Lorenzo in Miranda
RS88419. Silver denarius, RIC III MA438; MIR 18 27-27/12; BMCRE IV p. 394, 60; RSC II 164a; SRCV II 5193, Choice VF, excellent portrait, well centered, light toning, flow lines, small edge cracks, weight 3.304 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, posthumous, emission 2, 161 A.D.; obverse DIVVS ANTONINVS, bare-headed bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse CONSECRATIO, ornate funeral pyre of four tiers with quadriga on top; $150.00 (132.00)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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Soon after the Feast of Easter 337, Constantine fell seriously ill. He left Constantinople for the hot baths near his mother's city of Helenopolis. There, in a church his mother built in honor of Lucian the Apostle, he prayed, and there he realized that he was dying. He attempted to return to Constantinople, making it only as far as a suburb of Nicomedia. He summoned the bishops, and told them of his hope to be baptized in the River Jordan, where Christ was written to have been baptized. He requested the baptism right away, promising to live a more Christian life should he live through his illness. The bishops, Eusebius records, "performed the sacred ceremonies according to custom." It has been thought that Constantine put off baptism as long as he did so as to be absolved from as much of his sin as possible. Constantine died soon after at a suburban villa called Achyron, on 22 May 337.
RL88038. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VIII Antioch 39; LRBC I 1374; SRCV V 17488; Voetter 34; Cohen VII 760; Hunter V p. 283, 4 ff. var. (officina), EF, attractive highlighting desert patina, light marks, tight flan, weight 1.705 g, maximum diameter 15.2 mm, die axis 0o, 9th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, posthumous, Sep 337 - 340 A.D.; obverse DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG, veiled bust right; reverse Constantine in quadriga right, veiled, the hand of God reaches down to take him to heaven, star above, SMANΘ in exergue; $130.00 (114.40)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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Manus Dei, the hand of God, reaches down to take Constantine up to heaven. Constantine is a saint of the Eastern Orthodox Church.
RL88042. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VIII Antioch 39; LRBC I 1374; SRCV V 17488; Voetter 34; Cohen VII 760; Hunter V p. 283, 4 ff. var. (officina), EF, highlighting desert patina, die break reverse right side, weight 1.654 g, maximum diameter 14.9 mm, die axis 180o, 7th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, posthumous, 337 - Apr 340 A.D.; obverse DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG, veiled bust right; reverse Constantine in quadriga right, veiled, the hand of God reaches down to take him to heaven, SMANZ in exergue; $130.00 (114.40)


Faustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - Early 141, Wife of Antoninus Pius

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Pietas in traditional Latin usage expressed a complex, highly valued Roman virtue; a man or woman with pietas respected his or her responsibilities to the gods, family, other people and entities (such as the state), and understood his or her place in society with respect to others.
RB91021. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III AP1146A(a), BMCRE IV 1443; Hunter II 67, SRCV II 4631, F, choice obverse, excellent centering, reverse weakly struck and rough, weight 21.955 g, maximum diameter 33.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, posthumous, 141 A.D.; obverse DIVA AVGVSTA FAVSTINA, draped bust right, hair elaborately waved and in a bun on top of head, band of pearls; reverse PIETAS AVG (to the piety of the Emperor), Pietas standing left, dropping incense on candelabrum-altar with right, holding box in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking legs; from the Eric J. Engstrom Collection; $130.00 (114.40)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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Soon after the Feast of Easter 337, Constantine fell seriously ill. He left Constantinople for the hot baths near his mother's city of Helenopolis. There, in a church his mother built in honor of Lucian the Apostle, he prayed, and there he realized that he was dying. He attempted to return to Constantinople, making it only as far as a suburb of Nicomedia. He summoned the bishops, and told them of his hope to be baptized in the River Jordan, where Christ was written to have been baptized. He requested the baptism right away, promising to live a more Christian life should he live through his illness. The bishops, Eusebius records, "performed the sacred ceremonies according to custom." It has been thought that Constantine put off baptism as long as he did so as to be absolved from as much of his sin as possible. Constantine died soon after at a suburban villa called Achyron, on 22 May 337.
RL87872. Billon reduced centenionalis, Hunter V p. 284, 12 (also 1st officina); RIC VIII Alexandria p. 541, 32; LRBC I 1473; SRCV V 17473; Cohen VII 716, EF, excellent centering, brown tone with some silvering, flow lines, reverse center a little weak, tiny edge cracks, weight 1.706 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Alexandria mint, posthumous, late 347 - 348 A.D.; obverse DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG, veiled bust right; reverse VN - MR (venerabilis memoria - revered memory), Constantine standing slightly right, head right, veiled and togate, raising right hand, SMALA in exergue; ex Beast Coins, ex Malter Galleries; $125.00 (110.00)


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D.

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Posthumous commemorative struck by Marcus Aurelius' son, Commodus.
RB91948. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III C654 (S); BMCRE IV C385; Hunter II p. 408, 14; SRCV II 5982; Szaivert MIR 481-6/10; Cohen III 89, aVF, dark patina, well centered, weak reverse strike, weight 23.965 g, maximum diameter 31.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, consecration issue, c. 180 A.D.; obverse DIVVS M ANTONINVS PIVS, bare head right; reverse CONSECRATIO, eagle standing right on globe, head turned left, wings open, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking globe; scarce; $125.00 (110.00)


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

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The column of Antoninus Pius was red granite, 14.75 meters (48.4 ft) high and 1.9 meters (6 ft 3 in) in diameter with no decorating reliefs unlike the columns of Trajan and Marcus Aurelius. Prior to the 18th century the base was buried, but part of the column projected above the ground. In 1703 the rest of the column and the base were excavated. The column, lying on the ground covered by sheds, was damaged by fire in 1759. Repairs were unsuccessful and pieces from it were used in 1789 to restore the obelisk of Augustus. The white Italian marble base was restored in 1706-08. It is now in the Vatican Museums in the courtyard outside the entrance to the Vatican Pinacoteca. Base of the Column of Antoninus Pius
RB91326. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III MA1269, BMCRE IV MA880, Hunter II 24, Cohen II 354, SRCV II 5199, MIR 18 MA46-6/10, F, well centered, dark patina, scattered small encrustations, weight 24.132 g, maximum diameter 32.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, struck under M. Aurelius & Lucius Verus, c. 162; obverse DIVVS ANTONINVS, bare head right; reverse DIVO PIO, column set on large base within balustrade, surmounted by statue of Divus Antoninus Pius standing left on a Corinthian capital, eagle in right hand, vertical scepter in left, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking column; $110.00 (96.80)


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

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Two days before his death, Antoninus was at his ancestral estate at Lorium, in Etruria, about twelve miles (19 km) from Rome. He ate Alpine cheese at dinner quite greedily. In the night he vomited; he had a fever the next day. The day after that, 7 March 161, he summoned the imperial council, and passed the state and his daughter to Marcus. The emperor gave the keynote to his life in the last word that he uttered when the tribune of the night-watch came to ask the password - "aequanimitas" (equanimity). He then turned over, as if going to sleep, and died. His death closed out the longest reign since Augustus (surpassing Tiberius by a couple of months).
RS91218. Silver denarius, RIC III MA429; MIR 18 23-4/10; RSC II 154; BMCRE IV p. 392, 41; Hunter II 2; SRCV II 5190, VF, nice portrait, light toning, strong flow lines, reverse died wear, small edge cracks, weight 2.761 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, posthumous, 161 A.D.; obverse DIVVS ANTONINVS, bare head right; reverse CONSECRATIO, eagle standing right on bar, wings open, head turned back left; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 76 (7 Apr 2019), part of lot 942; $110.00 (96.80)


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Antoninus Pius' funeral ceremonies were described as elaborate but, despite the pyre depicted on this coin, according to his Historia Augusta biography, Antoninus' body (and not his ashes) was buried in Hadrian's mausoleum. After a seven-day interval (justitium) Marcus and Lucius nominated their father for deification. In contrast to their behavior during Antoninus' campaign to deify Hadrian, the senate did not oppose the emperors' wishes. A flamen, or cultic priest, was appointed to minister the cult of the deified Antoninus, now Divus Antoninus. A column was dedicated to Antoninus on the Campus Martius, and the temple he had built in the Forum in 141 to his deified wife Faustina was rededicated to the deified Faustina and the deified Antoninus. It survives as the church of San Lorenzo in Miranda.San Lorenzo in Miranda
RB91328. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III p. 315, 1266; Hunter II 22; BMCRE IV 872; Cohen II 165, SRCV -, F, light corrosion, weight 23.451 g, maximum diameter 31.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, posthumous commemorative, 161 AD; obverse DIVVS ANTONINVS, bare head right; reverse CONSECRATIO, Funeral pyre of four tiers topped with quadriga, the lowest tier hung with wreaths, the two center tiers with figures with niches, the top tier hung with draperies and flanked by torches, S - C (senatus consulto) at sides; $100.00 (88.00)




  



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Consecration