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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Roman Provincial ▸ Roman HispaniaView Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Provincial Coins of Hispania

Roman Hispania, Hacksilver Lot of 12 Cut Silver Coin Fragments, c. Before 50 B.C.

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Hacksilver lot of 12 cut silver coin fragments, reputedly all found in southern Spain. One Carthago Nova, cut 1/5 or 1/4 portion of a Hannibal shekel, 1.43g, cf. SNG BM 106 - 109, rare. Eleven cut fractions of Roman Republican denarii, mostly c. early 2nd century B.C.
LT87284. Silver fragment, cut fraction of a Hannibal shekel, plus 11 cut Republican denarii fragments, average VF, no tags or flips, the actual coin fragments in the photograph, as-is, no returns; $280.00 (€238.00)
 


Carthago Nova, Iberia, c. 237 - 206 B.C.

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In order to force Hannibal to retreat from Italy, Scipio Africanus attacked Carthaginian Spain and took Carthago Nova in 209 B.C. References most often identify this type as Punic, struck before 209 B.C., but they also note that the head is "Roman style." Some authorities believe, as we do, that this type may have been struck after 209, under Roman rule. Carthaginian coins sometimes depicted Barcid generals. This coin possibly depicts the Roman general Scipio Africanus.
GB84581. Bronze 1/5 unit, Villaronga-Benages 610, SNG BM Spain 129, Burgos 556, Villaronga MHC 283, Villaronga CNH 70, VF, nice green patina with highlighting earthen deposits, tight flan, reverse off center, weight 2.306 g, maximum diameter 15.1 mm, die axis 0o, Carthago Nova mint, c. 237 - 206 B.C.; obverse bare male head (Scipio Africanus?) left; reverse horse head right; rare; $120.00 (€102.00)
 


Carthago Nova, Iberia, c. 237 - 206 B.C.

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In order to force Hannibal to retreat from Italy, Scipio Africanus attacked Carthaginian Spain and took Carthago Nova in 209 B.C. References most often identify this type as Punic, struck before 209 B.C., but they also note that the head is "Roman style." Some authorities believe, as we do, that this type may have been struck after 209, under Roman rule. Carthaginian coins sometimes depicted Barcid generals. This coin possibly depicts the Roman general Scipio Africanus.
SH90611. Bronze 1/5 unit, Villaronga-Benages 610, SNG BM Spain 129, Burgos 556, Villaronga MHC 283, Villaronga CNH 70, aVF, ragged flan with two edge splits, weight 2.116 g, maximum diameter 15.6 mm, die axis 0o, Carthago Nova mint, c. 237 - 206 B.C.; obverse bare male head (Scipio Africanus?) left; reverse horse head right; rare; $110.00 (€93.50)
 


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Italica, Hispania Baetica

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Italica, Hispania Baetica was the birthplace of Trajan and Hadrian. The native Iberian town of Turdetani was refounded in 206 B.C. as Italica by Scipio Africanus to settle his victorious veterans from the Second Punic War and to control the area. The name reflected the veterans' Italian origins. Italica thrived, especially under Hadrian, who favored his birthplace. Hadrian expanded the city and elevated it to the status of colonia as Colonia Aelia Augusta Italica. He also added temples, including the enormous and unique Trajaneum in the center of the city to venerate his predecessor and adopted father, and rebuilt public buildings. The city started to dwindle as early as the 3rd century; a shift of the Guadalquivir River bed, probably due to silting, a widespread problem in antiquity that followed removal of the forest cover, left Italica's river port high and dry whilst Hispalis continued to grow nearby. The city may have been the birthplace of the emperor Theodosius I. Italica was important enough in late Antiquity to have a bishop of its own. The modern town of Santiponce overlies the pre-Roman Iberian settlement and part of the well-preserved Roman city.
RP85963. Bronze as, RPC I 65, Villaronga-Benages 3333, Burgos 1592, SNG Cop 417, aF, porous, tight flan, weight 27.6 g, maximum diameter 11.957 mm, die axis 270o, Italica (Santiponce, Spain) mint, 14 - 37 A.D.; obverse TI CAESAR AVGVSTVS PONT MAX IMP, bare head right; reverse MVNIC ITALIC PERM DIVI AVG, altar inscribed PROVIDE/NTIAE / AVGVSTI in three lines; $80.00 (€68.00)
 


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Colonia Patricia, Hispania Baetica

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Cordova, a city in Andalusia was the first colony planted by the Romans in Spain. Its original name was Corduba. When it was made a Roman colony it was renamed Colonia Patricia, to honor the veterans and worthy men who settled it, to whom honor was due, as to Fathers (Patribus). This type may have been struck for Augustus' visit to the city in 15 - 14 B.C.
RP84536. Bronze quadrans, Villaronga-Benages 3359, RPC I 131, SNG Lorichs 1393, SNG Cop -, gVF, dark green patina, buff earthen deposits, light marks, edge cracks, off center, weight 1.879 g, maximum diameter 14.0 mm, die axis 180o, Colonia Patricia (Cordoba, Spain) mint, 20 - 2 B.C., probably 15 - 14 B.C.; obverse PER CAE AVG, bare head left; reverse COLO PATR, priest's sacrificial implements: patera (bowl) above aspergillum (sprinkler), capis (jug), and lituus (wand); $60.00 (€51.00)
 


Carteia, Hispania Baetica, c. 44 B.C. - 1st Century A.D.

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The Latin colony of Carteia was founded in 171 B.C. In 27 B.C., when Augustus had become emperor, Hispania Ulterior was divided into Baetica (modern Andalusia) and Lusitania (modern Portugal, Extremadura, and part of Castilla-León). Cantabria and Basque country were also added to Hispania Citerior.
RP84139. Bronze quadrans, Villaronga-Benages 2609, Villaronga 65; RPC I 116, SNG Cop 434, SNG Lorichs 1337, SNG München -, SNG Tub, VF, tight flan, earthen deposits, areas of heavy scratches, weight 2.922 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 180o, Carteia mint, c. 44 B.C. - 1st century A.D.; obverse CARTEIA, head of Fortuna-Tyche right, wearing crown of turreted city walls, trident behind; reverse Cupid riding dolphin right, IIII VIR above, EX D D below; $40.00 (€34.00)
 







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REFERENCES

Alvarez-Burgos, F. La Moneda Hispanica desde sus origines hasta el Siglo V. (Madrid, 2008).
American Numismatic Society Collections Database (ANSCD) - http://numismatics.org/search/search.
Burgos, A. La moneda hispanica desde sus origenes hasta el siglo V. (Madrid, 2008).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (1992 - ).
Delgado, A. Catalogeu des monnaies et des medailles antiques du moyen age et des temps modernes, composant le cabinet numismatique de feu Mr. Gustave Daniel de Lorichs. (Madrid, 1857). Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints from the Lindgren Collection. (San Mateo, 1989).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Roman Provincial Coins (RPC) Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/.
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, The Millennium Edition, Volume One, The Republic and The Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 8: Egypt, North Africa, Spain - Gaul. (1994).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung, Part 1: Hispania. Gallia Narbonensis. (Berlin, 1968).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Münzsammlung Universität Tübingen, Part 1: Hispania-Sikelia. (Berlin, 1981).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain, Volume IX, British Museum, Part 2: Spain. (London, 2002).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, University of Glasgow, Part 1: Roman Provincial Coins: Spain-Kingdoms of Asia Minor. (Oxford, 2004).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Hispania I, Madrid. Museo Arqueológico Nacional. Ciudades Feno-púnicas.. (1994 - 2004).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Sweden, Vol. II: Stockholm, Part 6, National Museum of Monetary History, The G.D. Lorichs Collection. (Stockholm, 2003).
Villaronga, L. Corpus Nvmmvm Hispaniae Anti Avgvsti Aetatem. (Madrid, 1994).
Villaronga, L. La Monedas Hispano-Cartaginesas. (Barcelona, 1973).
Villaronga, L. & J. Benages. Ancient Coinage of the Iberian Peninsula: Greek / Punic / Iberian / Roman. (Barcelona, 2011).
Vives, A. La moneda Hispanica. (Madrid, 1926).

Catalog current as of Wednesday, September 19, 2018.
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Roman Hispania