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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Personifications| ▸ |Money||View Options:  |  |  | 

Money (Moneta)

Coins about...money! One of our favorite collecting themes. Roman propaganda often recorded largesses (represented by Liberalitas) on coins. She is usually depicted holding what was traditionally described as an abacus, a counting board. The object is also described as a tessera, type of banner, showing a number of painted marks equal to the number of aurei or denarii offered. Curtis Clay suggested it is actually a money shovel, a wooden shovel with shallow round depressions which could extract the exact number of coins needed from a chest. Another popular type is that of Moneta holding scales. One quite interesting coin is the Republic denarius of T.Carisius depicting mint tools: an anvil, tongs, a hammer and a die.

Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

|Julia| |Domna|, |Julia| |Domna,| |Augusta| |194| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Julia Domna was born in Emesa (now Homs), Syria in 170 A.D. She was the youngest daughter of high-priest Julius Bassianus, a descendant of the Royal House of Emesa. Emesa was famous for its Temple of the Sun, the center of worship for the ancient pagan cult El-Gebal (or Elagabal). El-Gebal, worshiped in the form of a conical black stone, was the Aramaic name for the Syrian Sun God and means God of the Mountain. Emesa was also the birthplace of three other Roman empresses, Julia Maesa, Julia Mamaea and Julia Soaemias, and one emperor, Julia Domna's nephew, Elagabalus.
RS92345. Silver denarius, RIC IV S627 (S); RSC III 103; BMCRE V p. 104, 418; SRCV II 6591, F, off center, minor encrustations, edge cracks, weight 3.225 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 194 - 195 A.D.; obverse IVLIA DOMNA AVG, draped bust right; reverse LIBERAL AVG, Liberalitas standing slightly left, polos or kalathos on head, counting board in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; only one sale in the last two decades recorded on Coin Archives (an ex Forum coin!); rare; $270.00 SALE |PRICE| $243.00


Constantius I, May 305 - 25 July 306 A.D.

|Constantius| |I|, |Constantius| |I,| |May| |305| |-| |25| |July| |306| |A.D.|, |follis| |(large)|
In 303 A.D., Diocletian began to persecute the Christians in earnest.
RT93182. Billon follis (large), RIC VI Aquileia 32a, SRCV IV 14094, Cohen VII 264, Hunter V -, Choice gVF, well centered, dark green patina, nice portrait, weight 8.936 g, maximum diameter 27.8 mm, die axis 180o, 3rd officina, Aquileia mint, as caesar, c. 301 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, laureate head right; reverse SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR (the sacred money of our two emperors and two princes), Moneta standing left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, V in right field, AQΓ in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $180.00 SALE |PRICE| $162.00


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

|Philip| |I|, |Philip| |I| |the| |Arab,| |February| |244| |-| |End| |of| |September| |249| |A.D.|, |sestertius|
Liberalitas coin types attest to occasions when the emperor has displayed his generosity towards the people by a distribution to them of money, provisions, or both. The first mention of Liberalitas was on coins of Hadrian. It was a type frequently repeated by the succeeding emperors. Indeed these instances of imperial generosity are more carefully recorded on coins than they are by history. Liberality is personified by the image of a woman, holding in one hand a counting board, or square tablet with a handle on which are cut a certain number of holes. These boards were used to quickly count the proper number of coins or other items for distribution to each person. In the other hand she holds a cornucopia, to indicate the prosperity of the state and the abundance of wheat contained in the public graineries.
RB93305. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 180a, Cohen V 88, Hunter III 88, SRCV III 8999, VF, well centered, nice portrait, flaw on nose, bumps and marks, reverse double struck and legend weak, ragged edge with cracks and flaw, weight 13.462 g, maximum diameter 30.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 245 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse LIBERALITAS AVGG II, Liberalitas standing half-left, coin counting board in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking low across field; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $150.00 SALE |PRICE| $135.00


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

|Philip| |I|, |Philip| |I| |the| |Arab,| |February| |244| |-| |End| |of| |September| |249| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
Liberality is personified by the image of a woman, holding in one hand a counting board, or square tablet with a handle on which are cut a certain number of holes. These boards were used to quickly count the proper number of coins or other items for distribution to each person. It appears they were held over a container, covered with coins and the excess swept away back into the container. The proper number of coins would fill the holes and then would be dumped out to the recipient. On coins this symbol indicated the prince had given to the people money, grain, or other articles of consumption. In the other hand she holds a cornucopia, to indicate the abundance of wheat contained in the public graineries.
RS93303. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 38b, RSC IV 87, Hunter III 21, SRCV III 8937, Choice gVF, excellent centering, attractive toning, nice portrait, flow lines, weight 4.217 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 245 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse LIBERALITAS AVGG II, Liberalitas standing half-left, head left, coin counting board in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $125.00 SALE |PRICE| $112.00


Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 May 305 A.D.

|Diocletian|, |Diocletian,| |20| |November| |284| |-| |1| |May| |305| |A.D.|, |follis|
In 303, Diocletian, Maximian, Galerius, and Constantius issued a series of edicts rescinding the legal rights of Christians and demanding that they comply with traditional religious practices. About 3,000 Christians died in the persecutions, many more were imprisoned and tortured, but most Christians avoided punishment.
RB93347. Billon follis, Hunter V 50 (also 1st officina), RIC VI Roma 111a, Cohen VI 434, SRCV IV 12814, Choice gVF, excellent centering, some silvering, weight 9.939 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Rome mint, 303 - 305 A.D.; obverse IMP C DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse SAC MON VRB AVGG ET CAESS NN, Moneta standing left, scales in right and cornucopia in left hand, R crescent P in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

|Philip| |I|, |Philip| |I| |the| |Arab,| |February| |244| |-| |End| |of| |September| |249| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
Liberality is personified by the image of a woman, holding in one hand a counting board, or square tablet with a handle on which are cut a certain number of holes. These boards were used to quickly count the proper number of coins or other items for distribution to each person. It appears they were held over a container, covered with coins and the excess swept away back into the container. The proper number of coins would fill the holes and then would be dumped out to the recipient. On coins this symbol indicated the prince had given to the people money, grain, or other articles of consumption. In the other hand she holds a cornucopia, to indicate the abundance of wheat contained in the public graineries.
RS93302. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 38b, RSC IV 87, Hunter III 21, SRCV III 8937, gVF, well centered, nice portrait, toned, small encrustations, minor edge splits, weight 5.308 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 245 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse LIBERALITAS AVGG II, Liberalitas standing slightly left, head left, coin counting board in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00







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