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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Troas||View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Greek Coins of Troas

The Troad or Troas is the historical name of the Biga Yarimadasi peninsula in the northwestern Turkey. Bounded by the Dardanelles to the northwest, by the Aegean Sea to the west and separated from the rest of Anatolia by the massif that forms Mount Ida, the Troad is drained by two main rivers, the Scamander (Karamenderes) and the Simois, which join near the ruins of Troy. The Kingdom of Pergamum ceded the territory to the Roman Republic.

Lamponeia, Troas, c. 5th - Early 4th Century B.C.

|Troas|, |Lamponeia,| |Troas,| |c.| |5th| |-| |Early| |4th| |Century| |B.C.|, |hemiobol|
Lamponeia was on the southern coast of Troas, on the long crest of a mountain, above the modern village of Kozlu in Canakkale Province, Turkey. From this site, the city could monitor sea traffic on the coast and control a narrow valley which connected Assos to the cities of the middle Skamander valley. The settlement was 800 m long and protected by a 7 m thick circuit wall of rough masonry and boulders, dated to the 6th century B.C. In the 5th century B.C. the city was a member of the Delian League and paid Athens a modest tribute of 1,000 drachms (on one occasion in 430/429 1,400 drachms). In the late 5th and early 4th century B.C. the city minted bronze coinage, but thereafter disappears from the historical record. It is possible that soon after the site was abandoned and its citizens moved to Assos. Late Roman and Byzantine period finds suggest that the site was reoccupied in this period, perhaps as a defensive measure against piracy and brigandage.
GS89698. Silver hemiobol, cf. SNG Cop 444 (obol); SNG Tübingen 2649 (triobol); Traité 2295; BMC Troas p. 72, 12 (hemidrachm); SNG Munchen -; SNG Kayhan -; Klein -, VF, well centered, toned, porous, oval flan, weight 0.270 g, maximum diameter 8.1 mm, die axis 0o, Lamponeia (near Kozlu, Canakkale, Turkey) mint, c. 5th - early 4th century B.C.; obverse bearded head of Dionysos right, hair bound in taenia; reverse facing head of bull, ΛAM around clockwise from lower left, all within a shallow incuse square; ex Beast Coins, this type is apparently unpublished in references as a hemidrachm, but larger denominations with the same types are published, and five hemiobol specimens are known from auctions over the last two decades; extremely rare; $200.00 SALE |PRICE| $180.00
 


Caius and Lucius, Caesars Under Augustus, 17 B.C. - 2 A.D., Skepsis, Troas

|Troas|, |Caius| |and| |Lucius,| |Caesars| |Under| |Augustus,| |17| |B.C.| |-| |2| |A.D.,| |Skepsis,| |Troas|, |AE| |15|
Struck around the time of Jesus' birth.

The brothers, Caius and Lucius, were the sons of Agrippa and Julia, daughter of Augustus. They were each designated caesar and were due to succeed Augustus, but they predeceased him in 4 and 2 A.D. respectively.

Tradition holds that Saint Cornelius the Centurion, the first non-Jewish convert to Christianity, became the first bishop of Skepsis in the early days of Christianity.
Skepsis
SL95879. Bronze AE 15, RPC I 2326 (8 spec.), BMC Troas -, SNG Cop -; countermark: Howgego -, NGC F, Strike 4/5, Surface 3/5, countermark (5872605-024), weight 2.36 g, maximum diameter 15 mm, die axis 180o, Skepsis (Kursunlutepe, Turkey) mint, c. 5 B.C. - 2 A.D.; obverse ΓAI KAIΣAP clockwise from lower left, bare head of Gaius right, countermark: N in rectangular punch on and behind back of neck; reverse ΛEY (downward on left), KAIΣAP (downward on right), HKΣ (below), bare head of Lucius right; NGC| Lookup; rare; $170.00 SALE |PRICE| $153.00
 


Alexandreia Troas, Troas, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Troas|, |Alexandreia| |Troas,| |Troas,| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.|, |AE| |19|
Alexandria Troas (modern Eski Stambul) is on the Aegean Sea near the northern tip of the west coast of Anatolia, a little south of Tenedos (modern Bozcaada). The city was founded by Antigonus around 310 B.C. with the name Antigoneia and was populated with the inhabitants of Cebren, Colone, Hamaxitus, Neandria, and Scepsis. About 301 B.C., Lysimachus improved the city and re-named it Alexandreia. Among the few structure ruins remaining today are a bath, an odeon, a theater and gymnasium complex and a stadium. The circuit of the old walls can still be traced.
CM89990. Bronze AE 19, SNG Cop 96 (same countermarks); cf. BMC Troas p. 12, 29 ff.; SNG Munchen 92 f.; SNGvA 1461, F, scattered porosity, edge crack, clear countermarks, weight 3.948 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria Troas (Eski Stambul, Turkey) mint, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo facing; c/m: lyre; reverse lyre, AΛEΞAN (or similar) around), all within laurel wreath; c/m: star of six rays around a central pellet within a 7.5mm round punch; $120.00 SALE |PRICE| $108.00
 


Larissa-Ptolemais, Troas, 3rd Century B.C.

|Troas|, |Larissa-Ptolemais,| |Troas,| |3rd| |Century| |B.C.|, |AE| |13|
Imhoof-Blumer attributed this type to Ptolemais in Pamphylia, but in Hill convincingly argued against that city. Waddington was of the opinion that these coins might belong to Lebedos under the name Ptolemais. L. Robert in Monnaies antiques en Troade (Paris, 1966), p. 56, suggests Larissa-Ptolemais in Troas. Most recent auction listings accept Robert's attribution but the identity of the city is by no means certain.
GB88082. Bronze AE 13, SNGvA 2026 (Lebedos-Ptolemais, Ionia), BMC Troas -, SNG Cop -, SNG Tübingen -, SNG Munchen -, Winterthur -, Klein -, VF, nice dark patina, some porosity, earthen deposits, weight 1.988 g, maximum diameter 13.1 mm, die axis 0o, Larissa-Ptolemais mint, 3rd century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIEΩ, amphora; very rare; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00
 


Kebren, Troas, 400 - 310 B.C.

|Troas|, |Kebren,| |Troas,| |400| |-| |310| |B.C.|, |AE| |10|
Kebren was in the middle Skamander valley in the Troad region of Anatolia. Its remains have been located in the forested foothills of Mount Ida (modern Kaz Dagi), approximately 7 km to the south of the Skamander. The population of Kebren was both Greek and Anatolian. In the 5th century B.C., Kebren was a member of the Delian League paying tribute to Athens. Following the defeat of Athens at the end of the Peloponnesian War in 404 B.C., Kebren came under the control of Zenis, who ruled on behalf of the Persian satrap Pharnabazos. Kebren was captured by the Spartan commander Dercylidas in 399 B.C., but soon after returned to Persian control. In 360 to 359, the Greek mercenary commander Charidemus briefly captured the city before being repelled by the Persian satrap Artabazos. At some point in the 4th century B.C. Kebren produced coinage depicting a satrap's head as the obverse type, indicating the city's close relationship with its Persian overlords. Kebren ceased to exist as an independent city about 310 B.C., when Antigonus I Monophthalmus founded Antigonia Troas (after 301 B.C. renamed Alexandria Troas) and included Kebren in the synoecism.
GB95369. Bronze AE 10, SNG Tubingen 2635, Traité II 2337, SNG Cop 263 var. (K vice KE), SNGvA 7625 var. (same), BMC Troas p. 45, 24 var. (same), Weber 5347 var. (same), aVF, dark patina, porosity, weight 0.921 g, maximum diameter 10.0 mm, die axis 240o, Kebren mint, 400 - 310 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse ram head right; KE monogram (ethnic) below; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00
 


Dardanos, Troas, 4th Century B.C.

|Troas|, |Dardanos,| |Troas,| |4th| |Century| |B.C.|, |AE| |17|
In mythology, Dardanos was founded by Dardanus, from whom the city, the region and the people took their name. It lay on the Hellespont, and is the source of the strait's modern name, the Dardanelles. From Dardanus' grandson Tros the people gained the additional name of Trojans and the region gained the additional name Troad. Tros' son Ilus subsequently founded a city called Ilion (in Latin Ilium) down on the plain, the city now commonly called Troy, and the kingdom was split between Ilium and Dardania. The Dardani people appear in the Trojan War under Aeneas, in close alliance with the Trojans, with whose name their own is often interchanged, especially by the Roman poets.The Troad
GB87737. Bronze AE 17, SNG Cop 303; BMC Troas p. 50, 18; SNGvA -; SNG Munchen -; SNG Tüb -, F, porous, corrosion, weight 6.069 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 270o, Dardanos mint, 4th century B.C.; obverse horseman galloping right, raising right hand, wearing petasos, chlamys flying behind; reverse cock right, standing erect, ∆AP above, grain ear right below; scarce; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00
 


Dardanos, Troas, c. 4th Century B.C.

|Troas|, |Dardanos,| |Troas,| |c.| |4th| |Century| |B.C.|, |AE| |11|
In mythology, Dardanos was founded by Dardanus, from whom the city, the region and the people took their name. It lay on the Hellespont, and is the source of the strait's modern name, the Dardanelles. From Dardanus' grandson Tros the people gained the additional name of Trojans and the region gained the additional name Troad. Tros' son Ilus subsequently founded a city called Ilion (in Latin Ilium) down on the plain, the city now commonly called Troy, and the kingdom was split between Ilium and Dardania. The Dardani people appear in the Trojan War under Aeneas, in close alliance with the Trojans, with whose name their own is often interchanged, especially by the Roman poets.The Troad
GB89025. Bronze AE 11, SNG Cop 290; SNG Ashmolean 1126; BMC Troas p. 49, 10; SNGvA -; SNG Munchen -; SNG Tübingen -, gF, dark patina with buff earthen highlighting, obverse off center, marks, weight 1.207 g, maximum diameter 10.5 mm, die axis 180o, Dardanos mint, c. 4th Century B.C.; obverse horseman galloping right, wearing chiton, chlamys (flying behind) and petasos, raising right hand; reverse cock standing right, race torch (control symbol) upper left, ∆APdownward on right; ex Numismatik Lanz; rare; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00
 


Birytis, Troas, c. 350 - 250 B.C.

|Troas|, |Birytis,| |Troas,| |c.| |350| |-| |250| |B.C.|, |AE| |11|
Birytis' precise location in western Asia Minor remains unknown but it probably stood either south of Troy or near Hellespont. Numismatics provides our only evidence this city existed.

The god Kabeiros is similar in appearance to Dionysos and the rites of his cult were likely similar to those of the Dionysian mysteries. The attributes of Kabeiros are a rhyton and hammer.

GB92904. Bronze AE 11, SNG Cop 249; SNG Munchen 19, 170; SNG Tüb 2574; BMC Troas p. 40, 6 - 7; SNGvA -, VF, green patina, scratches, weight 1.255 g, maximum diameter 11.3 mm, die axis 0o, Birytis mint, c. 350 - 250 B.C.; obverse head of Kabeiros left wearing pileus, two stars above; reverse club, B-I/P-Y divided in two lines across field, all within laurel wreath; $60.00 SALE |PRICE| $54.00
 


Alexandreia Troas, Troas, 3rd Century A.D.

|Troas|, |Alexandreia| |Troas,| |Troas,| |3rd| |Century| |A.D.|, |AE| |20|
Alexandria Troas (modern Eski Stambul) is on the Aegean Sea near the northern tip of the west coast of Anatolia, a little south of Tenedos (modern Bozcaada). The city was founded by Antigonus around 310 B.C. with the name Antigoneia and was populated with the inhabitants of Cebren, Colone, Hamaxitus, Neandria, and Scepsis. About 301 B.C., Lysimachus improved the city and re-named it Alexandreia. Among the few structure ruins remaining today are a bath, an odeon, a theater and gymnasium complex and a stadium. The circuit of the old walls can still be traced.
GB90128. Bronze AE 20, SNG Munchen 62; cf. SNG Cop 114; SNG Canakkale 536; SNGvA 7553; Bellinger Troy A490; BMC Troas p. 15, 53 ff. (obv legend variations), VF, weight 4.084 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 315o, Alexandria Troas (Eski Stambul, Turkey) mint, 3rd century A.D.; obverse CO-L TROAD, turreted and draped bust of Tyche of Alexandria Troas right, vexillum behind; reverse CO AVG TRO, eagle flying right, bull forepart right its talons; $45.00 SALE |PRICE| $40.50
 


Birytis, Troas, c. 350 - 250 B.C.

|Troas|, |Birytis,| |Troas,| |c.| |350| |-| |250| |B.C.|, |AE| |19|
Birytis' precise location in western Asia Minor remains unknown but it probably stood either south of Troy or near Hellespont. Numismatics provides our only evidence this city existed.

The god Kabeiros is similar in appearance to Dionysos and the rites of his cult were likely similar to those of the Dionysian mysteries. The attributes of Kabeiros are a rhyton and hammer.

GB83918. Bronze AE 19, SNG Cop 247; SNGvA 1502; BMC Troas p. 40, 1; SGCV II 4056, F/aF, dark patina, unstruck central areas, scratches, light corrosion, weight 6.409 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 315o, Birytis mint, c. 350 - 250 B.C.; obverse head of Kabeiros left wearing pileus, two stars flanking cap; reverse B-I/P-Y in fields flanking club, all within laurel wreath; $14.77 (€13.59)




  



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REFERENCES|

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