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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Syria| ▸ |Antioch||View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Coins of Antioch, Syria
Seleukid Kingdom, Alexander I Balas, 152 - 145 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |I| |Balas,| |152| |-| |145| |B.C.||tetradrachm|
Alexander Balas, of humble origin, claimed to be Antiochus IV's son and heir to the Seleukid throne. Rome and Egypt accepted his claims. He married Cleopatra Thea, daughter of King Ptolemy Philometor of Egypt. With his father-in-law's help, he defeated Demetrius Soter and became the Seleukid king. After he abandoned himself to debauchery, his father-in-law shifted his support to Demetrius II, the son of Demetrius Soter. Balas was defeated and fled to Nabataea where he was murdered.
SH95962. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 1782.2c; BMC Seleucid p. 52, 11 var. (outer left monogram); SNG Spaer 1424 var. (same); Newell SMA 142 (same); HGC 9 875a, gVF, fine Hellenistic style, old cabinet toning, edge split, weak area at neck/date, old scratches, weight 16.327 g, maximum diameter 31.3 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, c. 149 - 148 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Alexander Balas right; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY in two downward lines on the right, ΘEOΠATOPOΣ EYEPΓETOY in two downward lines on the left, Zeus seated left on high back throne, himation over left shoulder and around hips and legs, Victory in extended right hand offering wreath, lotus topped scepter in left hand, Θ outer left, PA monogram inner left, date ∆ΞP (Seleucid Era year 164) in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $450.00 (€414.00)
 


Seleukid Kingdom, Demetrius I Soter, 162 - 150 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Demetrius| |I| |Soter,| |162| |-| |150| |B.C.||tetradrachm|NEW
As required by the Treaty of Apamea, Demetrius, the son of Seleucus IV, was held in Rome as a hostage. After Antiochus IV (his uncle) died, he claimed the right to rule but Rome preferred Antiochus V, a weak child. Demetrius escaped, was welcomed in Syria and took his throne. Antiochus V and his regent were executed. Demetrius defeated Judas Maccabaeus and restored Seleukid control over Judaea.
GY95964. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 1637a; SNG Spaer 1257; Newell SMA 81; BMC Seleucid p. 47, 33 & pl. XIV, 2; HGC 9 796 (R1), aVF, toning, light corrosion/porosity, weight 15.785 g, maximum diameter 30.9 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 162 - 155/4 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Demetrios right with light beard, short hair, diadem ends falling straight behind, laurel wreath border; reverse Tyche seated left on throne without back, fully clothed, short scepter in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, seat supported by winged tritoness, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right, ∆HMHTPIOY downward on left, monogram (control) outer left; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $260.00 (€239.20)
 


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus V Eupator, 164 - 162 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |V| |Eupator,| |164| |-| |162| |B.C.||tetradrachm|NEW
Antiochus V was just nine years old when crowned. The kingdom was ruled by his regent Lysias. In 163 or early 162 B.C., the Roman legate Gnaeus Octavius enforced the Treaty of Apamea by burning the Seleukid fleet and killing the army's war elephants (private citizens assassinated him for this outrage). Soon after, Ptolemaeus, the satrap of Commagene, declared independence. Only two years after becoming king, his uncle Demetrius escaped captivity, claimed the throne and had Antiochos V and his regent executed.
SH95968. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 1575(1); Newell SMA 74; SNG Spaer 1243; Houghton CSE 136; BMC Seleucid p. 44, 3; HGC 9 752, VF, toned, excellent portrait, light marks, edge chip, areas of slightest corrosion, weight 15.537 g, maximum diameter 30.9 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 164 - 162 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Antiochos V right, diadem ends fall straight behind, fillet border; reverse Zeus seated left, himation around hips and legs and over left arm, Victory in extended right hand crowning name, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on right, ANTIOXOY downward on left, EYΠATOPOΣ (of a good father) in exergue, ∆I monogram outer left; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $220.00 (€202.40)
 


Seleukid Kingdom, Demetrius I Soter, 162 - 150 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Demetrius| |I| |Soter,| |162| |-| |150| |B.C.||tetradrachm|NEW
As required by the Treaty of Apamea, Demetrius, the son of Seleucus IV, was held in Rome as a hostage. After Antiochus IV (his uncle) died, he claimed the right to rule but Rome preferred Antiochus V, a weak child. Demetrius escaped, was welcomed in Syria and took his throne. Antiochus V and his regent were executed. Demetrius defeated Judas Maccabaeus and restored Seleukid control over Judaea.
GY95966. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 1638(1)c; Newell SMA 83; SNG Spaer 1256; BMC Seleucid p. 47, 32; HGC 9 795f, aVF, dark old cabinet toning, bumps and scratches, weight 16.262 g, maximum diameter 31.0 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 162 - 155/4 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Demetrios right, clean-shaven, diadem ends falling straight behind, laurel wreath border; reverse Tyche seated left on throne without back, fully clothed, short scepter in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, seat supported by winged tritoness, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right, ∆HMHTPIOY downward on left, monogram outer left; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $200.00 (€184.00)
 


Seleukid Kingdom, Demetrius I Soter, 162 - 150 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Demetrius| |I| |Soter,| |162| |-| |150| |B.C.||tetradrachm|NEW
As required by the Treaty of Apamea, Demetrius, the son of Seleucus IV, was held in Rome as a hostage. After Antiochus IV (his uncle) died, he claimed the right to rule but Rome preferred Antiochus V, a weak child. Demetrius escaped, was welcomed in Syria and took his throne. Antiochus V and his regent were executed. Demetrius defeated Judas Maccabeus and restored Seleukid control over Judaea.
GY95967. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 1641(6)a; Newell SMA 118; BMC Seleucid p. 46, 12 and pl. XIV, 1; HGC 9 798, VF, slightly off center on an oval flan, toning in recesses, light bumps and scratches, polished, weight 15.747 g, maximum diameter 30.8 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 152 - 151 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Demetrios right, clean shaven, long hair on neck, diadem ends falling straight behind, laurel wreath border; reverse Tyche seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, short scepter in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, seat supported by tritoness, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right, ∆HMHTPIOY / ΣΩTHPOΣ in two downward lines on left, two monograms (controls) outer left, AΞP (year 161) in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $200.00 (€184.00)
 


Seleukid Kingdom, Philip I Philadelphos, c. 94 - 83 or 75 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |I| |Philadelphos,| |c.| |94| |-| |83| |or| |75| |B.C.||tetradrachm|NEW
Philip I Philadelphus was the fourth son of Antiochus VIII Grypus. He took the diadem in 94 B.C. together with his twin brother Antiochus XI Epiphanes, after the eldest son Seleucus VI Epiphanes was killed by their cousin Antiochus X Eusebes. The next year Antiochus X killed Antiochus XI. Antiochus X was probably killed in 88 B.C. Philip's younger brother Demetrius III turned on Philip I and took the capital, but the Philip I prevailed and took Antioch. Their youngest brother Antiochus XII took Damascus. Philip I tried to take Damascus, after which he disappears from the historical record, which does not tell us how or when he died. His death is traditionally dated 83 B.C. but Numismatic evidence and clues in ancient literature indicate that Philip I might have died in 75 B.C. His coins remained in circulation when the Romans conquered Syria in 64 B.C. Roman authorities in Syria continued to issue coins modeled on Philip I's coins, including his portrait, until 13 B.C.
GY97097. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 2463(3)j; Newell SMA 449; SNG Spaer 2808; BMC Seleucid p. 100, 4; HGC 9 1319, VF, toned, typical tight flan, obverse a little off center, light marks, weight 15.515 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 45o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, c. 88/7 - 83/75 B.C.; obverse diademed head right, fillet border; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ΦIΛIΠΠOY in two lines downward on right EΠIΦANOYΣ / ΦIΛA∆EΛΦOY in two lines downward on left, Zeus seated left on high-backed throne, Nike presenting wreath in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, Φ over A outer left (control, off flan), monogram below throne, (frozen control) below throne, Σ (control) in exergue, all within laurel wreath; ex Leu Numismatik web auction 13 (16 Aug 2020), lot 2121 (part of); $190.00 (€174.80)
 


Seleukid Kingdom, Philip I Philadelphos, c. 94 - 83 or 75 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |I| |Philadelphos,| |c.| |94| |-| |83| |or| |75| |B.C.||tetradrachm|NEW
Philip I Philadelphus was the fourth son of Antiochus VIII Grypus. He took the diadem in 94 B.C. together with his twin brother Antiochus XI Epiphanes, after the eldest son Seleucus VI Epiphanes was killed by their cousin Antiochus X Eusebes. The next year Antiochus X killed Antiochus XI. Antiochus X was probably killed in 88 B.C. Philip's younger brother Demetrius III turned on Philip I and took the capital, but the Philip I prevailed and took Antioch. Their youngest brother Antiochus XII took Damascus. Philip I tried to take Damascus, after which he disappears from the historical record, which does not tell us how or when he died. His death is traditionally dated 83 B.C. but Numismatic evidence and clues in ancient literature indicate that Philip I might have died in 75 B.C. His coins remained in circulation when the Romans conquered Syria in 64 B.C. Roman authorities in Syria continued to issue coins modeled on Philip I's coins, including his portrait, until 13 B.C.
GY97098. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 2463(3)j; Newell SMA 449; SNG Spaer 2808; BMC Seleucid p. 100, 4; HGC 9 1319, VF, tight flan typical for the type, light marks, weight 15.378 g, maximum diameter 24.8 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, c. 88/7 - 83/75 B.C.; obverse diademed head right, fillet border; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ΦIΛIΠΠOY in two lines downward on right EΠIΦANOYΣ / ΦIΛA∆EΛΦOY in two lines downward on left, Zeus seated left on high-backed throne, Nike presenting wreath in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, Φ over A outer left (control, off flan), monogram below throne, (frozen control) below throne, Σ (control) in exergue, all within laurel wreath; ex Leu Numismatik web auction 13 (16 Aug 2020), lot 2121 (part of); $190.00 (€174.80)
 


Seleukid Kingdom, Philip I Philadelphos, c. 94 - 75 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |I| |Philadelphos,| |c.| |94| |-| |75| |B.C.||tetradrachm|NEW
This rare type is distinguished from the more common Antioch mint types by a different portrait style.
GY97096. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 2464c; HGC 9 1320 (R1); SNG Spaer 2817; BMC Seleucid -, aVF, crackled surface (perhaps indicating a river find), well centered on a tight flan as typical for the type, weight 14.875 g, maximum diameter 24.6 mm, die axis 30o, uncertain (Antioch?) mint, c. 88 - 75 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Philip I Philadelphos right, bulging eye, pouting lips, pronounced aquiline nose, fillet border; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΦIΛIΠΠOY EΠIΦANOYΣ ΦIΛA∆EΛΦOY, Zeus seated left on high-backed throne, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, Nike presenting wreath in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, no controls left, (frozen control monogram) below throne, T (control) in exergue, all within laurel wreath; ex Leu Numismatik web auction 13 (16 Aug 2020), lot 2121 (part of); rare; $130.00 (€119.60)
 


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VII Euergetes Sidetes, 138 - 129 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |VII| |Euergetes| |Sidetes,| |138| |-| |129| |B.C.||AE| |14|
After his brother Demetrius was captured by the Parthians, Antiochus VII was made king. He married Demetrius' wife Cleopatra Thea. He defeated the usurper Tryphon at Dora and laid siege to Jerusalem in 134. According to Josephus, the Hasmonean king John Hyrcanus opened King David's sepulcher and removed three thousand talents, which he then paid Antiochus to spare the city.
GY91728. Bronze AE 14, Houghton-Lorber II 2068.6, Houghton CSE 283, cf. SNG Spaer 184 (date off flan), HGC 9 1096 (S), BMC Seleucid p. 75, 68 (date, control symbol), Choice VF, dark green patina with red earthen highlighting, well centered, scattered mild porosity, obverse edge beveled, weight 2.793 g, maximum diameter 13.5 mm, die axis 270o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 134 - 133 B.C.; obverse lion head right; reverse club vertical with handle up, BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ANTIOXOY / EYEPΓETOY in three downward lines, first two lines on right, last line on left, ∆I monogram over cornucopia (control marks) left (cornucopia unstruck), ΘOP (year 179 of the Seleukid Era) below; $120.00 (€110.40)
 


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||AE| |29|
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
RY92560. Bronze AE 29, McAlee 410(i) (rare), SNG Cop 180, RPC II 2024 (18 spec. with a variety of controls), BMC Galatia p. 181, 245 var. (E), F, dark green patina, well centered, light marks and scratches, light earthen deposits, obverse edge beveled, weight 12.202 g, maximum diameter 29.4 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 81 - 83 A.D.; obverse IMP DOMITI-ANVS CAES AVG, laureate head left; reverse large S C, Θ below (control number, Greek 9), within laurel wreath with eight bunches of leaves; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $110.00 (€101.20)
 




  



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REFERENCES|

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