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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Syria| ▸ |Antioch||View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Coins of Antioch, Syria
Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Antioch, Syria

|Antioch|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Syria||AE| |26|
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
CM112118. Bronze AE 26, RPC II 2022g (2 spec.); McAlee 407g (ex rare); countermark: Howgego 245, gF, tight flan cutting off most of legend, marks, weight 11.872 g, maximum diameter 25.6 mm, die axis 0o, 7th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 81 - 83 A.D.; obverse IMP DOMITIANVS CAES AVG, laureate head right; countermark: Athena standing right in 6x4mm rectangular punch, spear vertical behind in her right, left hand resting on grounded shield; reverse large S C (senatus consulto), Z (7th officina) below, within laurel wreath with eight bunches of leaves; from the Michael Arslan Collection; extremely rare; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Roman Provincial Syria

|Antioch|, |Tiberius,| |19| |August| |14| |-| |16| |March| |37| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Syria||as|
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.
RY112246. Bronze as, McAlee 217(e)/2, RPC I 4272, VF, dark and earthen patina, weight 14.713 g, maximum diameter 28.1 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 31 - 32 A.D.; obverse TI CAESAR AVG TR POT XXXIII, laureate head right; reverse large SC, linear inner border around, all within a laurel wreath of six bunches of leaves; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00


Seleukid Kingdom, Alexander I Balas, 152 - 145 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |I| |Balas,| |152| |-| |145| |B.C.||AE| |15|
The aegis was a well-known symbol of Alexander the Great. After his death, the body of Alexander and his aegis wound up in the hands of the Ptolemies. At the time this coin was struck, Alexander Balas was the son in law of Ptolemy VI and the Ptolemaic candidate for the Seleucid throne. After the break between them, Ptolemy VI dissolved his daughter's first marriage and married her to Demetrius II, as if she were a piece of furniture. (J.P. Mahaffy). Alexander Balas fell at the 145 BC Battle of Oenoparas. Though the Battle was a Ptolemaic victory, Ptolemy VI died of battle wounds a few days later. Alexander Balas, of humble origin, claimed to be Antiochus IV's son and heir to the Seleukid throne. Rome and Egypt accepted his claims. He married Cleopatra Thea, daughter of King Ptolemy Philometor of Egypt. With his father-in-law's help, he defeated Demetrius Soter and became the Seleukid king. After he abandoned himself to debauchery, his father-in-law shifted his support to Demetrius II, the son of Demetrius Soter. Balas was defeated and fled to Nabataea where he was murdered. Apamea, on the right bank of the Orontes River, was an ancient Greek and Roman city. It was located at a strategic crossroads for Eastern commerce and became one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Seleucus also made it a military base with 500 elephants, and an equestrian stud with 30,000 mares and 300 stallions.
GY112042. Bronze AE 15, Houghton-Lorber II 1792(2)b, Babelon 869, Houghton CSE 207 var. (A vice monogram), cf. SNG Spaer 1481 (control obscure), VF, porosity, obv. off center, edge cracks/splits, obv. edge beveled, weight 1.903 g, maximum diameter 14.8 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 150 - 146 B.C.; obverse aegis with gorgoneion (facing head of Medusa) at center; reverse Pegasos flying right right, AYB monogram (control) below, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) above, AΛEΞANΔPOY (Alexander) below; rare; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Antioch|, |Tiberius,| |19| |August| |14| |-| |16| |March| |37| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||semis|
32 A.D. is a traditional date of the crucifixion of Jesus.
RY112382. Bronze semis, McAlee 218(c), RPC Online I 4273, Wruck 15b var. (dot above),, VF, porous, a little off center, weight 8.852 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 31 - 32 A.D.; obverse TI CAESAR AVG TR POT XXXIII, laureate head right; reverse large SC, dot to left, linear inner border around, all within a laurel wreath, outer dot border; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria, 128 - 129 A.D.

|Antioch|, |Antioch,| |Seleukis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria,| |128| |-| |129| |A.D.||trichalkon|
Michael Molnar, an astronomer, believes this coin depicts Jupiter's occultation of Aries in 6 B.C., the most probable "Star of Bethlehem." We think it is unlikely; nevertheless, the type is very popular and somewhat expensive.
GB90244. Bronze trichalkon, RPC Online III 3729, Butcher CRS 266, McAlee 125(d), SNG Hunterian II 2950, F, dark near black patina, highlighting red earthen deposits, weight 5.145 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, reign of Hadrian, 128 - 129 A.D.; obverse ANTIOXEΩN THC MHTPOΠOΛEWC, veiled and turreted head of Tyche right, weak countermark at chin; reverse ram leaping right, looking back, star within crescent above, ET ZOP (year 177 of the Caesarean Era) below; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Nerva, 18 September 96 - 25 January 98 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Nerva,| |18| |September| |96| |-| |25| |January| |98| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||as|
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
RY111785. Bronze as, McAlee 421(d); RPC Online III 3482; Butcher CRS 187; SNG Hunterian II 2907; BMC Galatia, p. 182, 261; Wruck 129, aVF, nice portrait green patina, some roughness, slightly off center, weight 12.763 g, maximum diameter 29.0 mm, die axis 0o, 4th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, Jan - Sep 97 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR NERVA AVG III COS, laureate head right; reverse large S C, small Δ (4th officina) below, all within laurel wreath with eight bunches of leaves; ex CNG e-auction 510 (23 Feb 2022), lot 460; ex Dr. Jay M. Galst Collection; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Antioch|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||as|
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
RP111928. Bronze as, McAlee 402(d) (rare); RPC II 2016; BMC Galatia p. 181, 246, VF, earthen deposits, obverse corrosion, weight 13.209 g, maximum diameter 27.8 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, as caesar, 69 - 79 A.D.; obverse DOMITIANVS CAESAR, laureate head left; reverse large S C, no dot in field, within laurel wreath with eight bunches of leaves; from the Michael Arslan Collection; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Seleukid Kingdom, Diodotus Tryphon, 142 - 138 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Diodotus| |Tryphon,| |142| |-| |138| |B.C.||AE| |18|
Tryphon, a general, betrayed and deposed the child king Antiochus VI and seized power for himself in Coele-Syria. He reinstated Hasmonean rule in Judea in exchange for which Jewish armies under the High Priest Jonathan marched against his rival Demetrius. But Tryphon betrayed Jonathan taking him prisoner at a "friendly" meeting and marching his army to Judaea. Jonathan's brother, Simon Maccabaeus, was ready for battle, preventing invasion. Tryphon promised to free Jonathan in exchange for one hundred talents and Jonathan's two sons as hostages. Simon did not trust Tryphon, but he complied so he could not be accused of his brother's death. As expected, Jonathan was executed.Tryphon committed suicide after he was defeated by Antiochus VII.
GY98894. Bronze AE 18, Houghton-Lorber II 2034(2)e, SNG Spaer 1830, Babelon Rois 1052, Houghton CSE 261, HGC 9 1061 (S), VF/F, dark green patina, central cavities, weight 4.842 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 142 - 138 B.C.; obverse diademed head right, diadem ends falling straight behind; reverse spiked Macedonian helmet left, with cheek guards, adorned with a wild goat's horn above the visor, star (control) left, BAΣIΛEΩΣ / TPYΦΩNOΣ in two downward lines on the right, AYTOKPATOPOΣ downward on left; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VI Dionysus, 144 - c. 142 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |VI| |Dionysus,| |144| |-| |c.| |142| |B.C.||AE| |24|
After his father was deposed by Demetrius II, the general Diodotus Tryphon nominated Antiochus VI as king. He gained the allegiance of most of the Seleucid domain, including Judaea, but was actually only a puppet of the general. He died after "ruling" for two years. He was likely assassinated under orders from Tryphon, who then made himself king.
GY98888. Bronze serrated AE 24, Houghton-Lorber II 2006(a), SNG Spaer 1772, Houghton CSE 248, Babelon Rois 1007, SNG Cop 306, HGC 9 1043 (C-S), gF, green patina, obv. off center, earthen deposits, central dimples, weight 7.178 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 45o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, c. mid-143 - 142 B.C.; obverse radiate head of Antiochos VI right, wreathed in ivy; reverse elephant walking left, holding torch in trunk, BAΣIΛEΩS ANTIOXOY in two lines above, EΠIΦANOYΣ ΔIONYΣOY in two lines in exergue, ΣTA over cornucopia (controls) right; $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VI Dionysus, 144 - c. 142 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |VI| |Dionysus,| |144| |-| |c.| |142| |B.C.||AE| |22|
After his father was deposed by Demetrius II, the general Diodotus Tryphon nominated Antiochus VI as king. He gained the allegiance of most of the Seleucid domain, including Judaea, but was actually only a puppet of the general. He died after "ruling" for two years. He was likely assassinated under orders from Tryphon, who then made himself king.
GY98889. Bronze serrated AE 22, Houghton-Lorber II 2006(c), SNG Spaer 1774, Houghton CSE 249, Babelon Rois 1011, SNG Cop 304, HGC 9 1043 (C-S), gF, green patina, earthen deposits, central dimples, weight 7.348 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, c. mid-143 - 142 B.C.; obverse radiate head of Antiochos VI right, wreathed in ivy; reverse elephant walking left, holding torch in trunk, BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY in two lines above, EΠIΦANOYΣ ΔIONYΣOY in two lines in exergue, ΣTA over star (controls) to the right; $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00




  



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REFERENCES|

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