Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome To Forum Ancient Coins!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 or 252-497-2724 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities Welcome To Forum Ancient Coins!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Internet Challenged? We Are Happy To Take Your Order Over The Phone 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
New & Reduced


Show Empty Categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
My FORVM
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
zoom.asp
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Thrace & Moesia||View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Greek Coins from Thrace and Moesia
Roman Empire, 9 Provincial Bronzes From Balkan Region, 193 - 253 A.D.

|Multiple| |Coin| |Lots|, |Roman| |Empire,| |9| |Provincial| |Bronzes| |From| |Balkan| |Region,| |193| |-| |253| |A.D.||Lot|
The following is from Moneta Numismatic Services tags and is not verified by FORVM:
1) Septimius Severus, AE17, 2.45g, Nikopolis, Moesia Inferior, Juno, VF.
2) Macrinus and Diadumenian, AE27, 12.85g, Marcianopolis, Moesia Inferior, Confronting heads. / Hermes standing. Varbanov 1192, F.
3) Caracalla, AE17, 2.63g, Nikopolis, Moesia Inferior, Tripod, VF.
4) Elagabalus, AE16, 3.13g, Nikopolis, Moesia Inferior, Grape bunch, F.
5) Elagabalus and Julia Maesa, AE26, 11.05g, Marcianopolis, Moesia Inferior, Tyche standing, F.
6) Elagabalus, AE15, 2.14g, Nikopolis, Moesia Inferior, Lion walking right, AMNG I 229, F.
7) Gordian III, AE18, 2.71g, Nicaea, Bithynia, Three military standards. SNG Cop 526, VF.
8) Trajan Decius, AE27,13.08g, Viminacium, Moesia Superior, Moesia standing between bull and lion, AN XI in exergue, VF.
9) Trebonianus Gallus, AE24, 9.15g, Viminacium, Moesia Superior, Moesia standing between bull and lion, AN XII in exergue, F.
LT96212. Bronze Lot, 9 Roman provincial bronzes from Balkan region, F or better, green patinas, 193 - 253 A.D.; the actual coins in the photograph, in Moneta Numismatic Services flips (non-archival) with their tags (information not verified by FORVM), tag prices total $410, 9 coins; $180.00 (181.80)


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior

|Nikopolis|, |Gordian| |III,| |29| |July| |238| |-| |25| |February| |244| |A.D.,| |Nikopolis| |ad| |Istrum,| |Moesia| |Inferior||AE| |29|NEW
Nicopolis ad Istrum was founded by Trajan around 101-106, at the junction of the Iatrus (Yantra) and the Rositsa rivers, in memory of his victory over the Dacians. Its ruins are located at the village of Nikyup, 20 km north of Veliko Tarnovo in northern Bulgaria. The town peaked during the reigns of Trajan, Hadrian, the Antonines and the Severan dynasty. In 447, the Nicopolis was destroyed by Attila's Huns. In the 6th century, it was rebuilt as a powerful fortress enclosing little more than military buildings and churches, following a very common trend for the cities of that century in the Danube area. It was finally destroyed by the Avar invasions at the end of the 6th century.
RP110620. Bronze AE 29, HHJ Nikopolis 8.36.5.1, AMNG I/I 2048, RPC VII.2 1265.1, SNG Budapest 482, Varbanov I 4186 var. (rev. legend arrangement), Choice VF, broad flan with full borders and legends, green patina, central depressions, weight 13.556 g, maximum diameter 29.1 mm, die axis 180o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, consular legate Sabinius Modestus, 241 - 244 A.D.; obverse AVT K M ANTW ΓOP∆IANOC AVΓ (AVΓ ligate), laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse VΠ CAB MO∆ECTOY NIKOΠOΛEITΩN ΠP,O/C/I/C (ΩN & ΠP ligate, last 4 letters in column in left field), Demeter standing facing, head left, grain-ears in right hand, long torch in left hand; $135.00 (136.35)


Kingdom of Bosporus, Rheskuporis V, 242 - 276 A.D.

|Bosporan| |Kingdom|, |Kingdom| |of| |Bosporus,| |Rheskuporis| |V,| |242| |-| |276| |A.D.||stater|
The Bosporan Kingdom (or Kingdom of the Cimmerian Bosporus) was in eastern Crimea and the Taman Peninsula on the shores of the Cimmerian Bosporus, the present-day Strait of Kerch (it was not named after the Bosphorus beside Istanbul). The mixed population adopted Greek language and civilization. The prosperity of the kingdom was based on the export of wheat, fish and slaves. The kingdom's golden age was 2nd and 1st centuries B.C. At the end of the 2nd century A.D., King Sauromates II inflicted a critical defeat on the Scythians and expanded his state to include the entire Crimea. It was the longest surviving Roman client kingdom, lasting until it was overrun by the Huns c. 375 A.D.
RP99912. Billon stater, Frolova BAR 166 pp. 137-138, pl. IV, 1227, pl. LXXXI, 21-22; RPC Online IX 179; MacDonald Bosporus 608/1 (Rhescuporis IV); Anokhin 697 (same), VF/gVF, small edge cracks, weight 7.200 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, 249 - 250 A.D.; obverse BACIΛEWC PHCKOYΠOPI∆, diademed and draped bust of Rheskuporis right; reverse laureate and draped bust of Roman emperor (Philip I or Trajan Decius) right, club handle upward before (control), ςMΦ ([year] 546 [of the Pontic Era]); $125.00 (126.25)


Celtic, Pannonian, or Thracian Tribes, c. 180 - 35 B.C., Imitative of Thessalonika, Macedonia

|Celtic| |&| |Tribal|, |Celtic,| |Pannonian,| |or| |Thracian| |Tribes,| |c.| |180| |-| |35| |B.C.,| |Imitative| |of| |Thessalonika,| |Macedonia||AE| |20|
We do not know of another specimen similar to this. The identification of the prototype is clear. But the maker of this imitative is uncertain.
CE98465. Bronze AE 20, for prototype see AMNG III/2, 21; SNG ANS 804; HGC 3.1 743 (Thessalonika), VF, green patina, earthen deposits, weight 6.177 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 0o, tribal mint, c. 180 - 35 B.C.; obverse bearded Janiform head; reverse abstract design imitative of two centaurs back to back rearing outwards from center, completely abstract imitation of inscriptions above and below; $120.00 (121.20)


Die Frhe Mnzprgung Vom Kimmerschen Bosporus

|Numismatic| |Books|, |Die| |Frhe| |Mnzprgung| |Vom| |Kimmerschen| |Bosporus|
The early coinage of the Cimmerian Bosporus (mid-6th to early 4th century BC): The coins of the cities Pantikapaion, Theodosia, Nymphaion, and Phanagoria, and also the Sindi.
BK13181. Die Frhe Mnzprgung Vom Kimmerschen Bosporus by Nina A Frolova, 2004, in German, 100 pages, new, priced below FORVM's cost!; $110.00 (111.10)


Kingdom of Bithynia, Prusias II Kynegos, 185 - 149 B.C.

|Kingdom| |of| |Bithynia|, |Kingdom| |of| |Bithynia,| |Prusias| |II| |Kynegos,| |185| |-| |149| |B.C.||AE| |20|
Prusias II, son of Prusias I, inherited his father's name but not his character. He first joined with Eumenes of Pergamon in war against Pontus, but later turned on Pergamon and invaded. He was defeated and Pergamon demanded heavy reparations. Prusias sent his son Nicomedes II to Rome to ask for aid in reducing the payments. When Nicomedes revolted, Prusias II was murdered in the temple of Zeus at Nikomedia.

Like satyrs, centaurs were notorious for being wild, lusty, overly indulgent drinkers and carousers, violent when intoxicated, and generally uncultured delinquents. Chiron, by contrast, was intelligent, civilized and kind. He was not related directly to the other centaurs. He was the son of the Titan Cronus and the Oceanid Philyr. The other centaurs were spawned by the cloud Nephele on the slopes of Mount Pelion. Apollo taught the young Chiron the art of medicine, herbs, music, archery, hunting, gymnastics and prophecy, and made him rise above his beastly nature. He became a renowned teacher who mentored many of the greatest heroes of myth including the Argonauts Jason and Peleus, the physician Asklepios, and Achilles of Troy.
GB99271. Bronze AE 20, SNG Cop 639; BMC Pontus p. 211, 9; Rec Gen I p. 226, 26; HGC 7 629; SGCV II 7266, aVF, dark patina, spots of corrosion, reverse edge beveled, weight 5.240 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 0o, Nikomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, c. 180 - 150 B.C.; obverse head of young Dionysos right, wreathed with ivy; reverse centaur Chiron standing right, playing lyre, his animal skin cloak flying behind, monogram inner right under raised foreleg, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right, ΠPOYΣIOY downward on left; $110.00 (111.10)


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Serdica, Thrace

|Serdica|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Serdica,| |Thrace||AE| |29|
Serdica prospered under Rome. Turrets, protective walls, public baths, administrative and cult buildings, a civic basilica and a large amphitheater were built. When Diocletian divided Dacia into Dacia Ripensis (on the banks of the Danube) and Dacia Mediterranea, Serdica became the capital of Dacia Mediterranea. The city was destroyed by the Huns in 447, but was rebuilt by Justinian and surrounded with great fortress walls whose remnants can still be seen today. Although also often destroyed by the Slavs, the town remained under Byzantine dominion until 809. Serdica is today Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria.
RP110548. Bronze AE 29, H-J Serdica 12.18.35.10, Varbanov III -, BMC Thrace -, attractive F, nice portrait for the grade, weight 15.998 g, maximum diameter 29.2 mm, die axis 0o, Serdica (Sofia, Bulgaria) mint, 198 - 217 A.D.; obverse AVT K M AVP CEV ANTΩNEINOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse OVΛΠIAC CEP∆IKHC, Dikaiosyne/Nemesis standing left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, wheel at feet behind left; ex R. Basler International Numismatics (Irvine, CA); $110.00 (111.10)


Kings of Thrace, Adaios, c. 255 - 245 B.C.

|Kingdoms| |of| |Thrace|, |Kings| |of| |Thrace,| |Adaios,| |c.| |255| |-| |245| |B.C.||AE| |22|
Adaios probably served as a Seleukid strategos (military governor) of Thrace under the King Antiochos II Theos. Antiochos II took Thracian territory from Ptolemy II Philopator, c. 255 - 253 B.C., during the Second Syrian War. After Antiochos II and Ptolemy II made peace. Adaios continued to rule southern Thrace, making Kypsela his capital. Adaios was executed at Kypsela by Ptolemy III Euergetes after Ptolemy advanced into southern Thrace, c. 246 - 241 B.D., during the Third Syrian War.

This type was the largest of three bronze denominations Adaios issued. References list the lower monogram only as Σ, but on better specimens the AΣ monogram is clear.
GB110080. Bronze AE 22, SNG Tb 971; SNG Cop 1179; SNG BM 324; HGC 3.2 1763 (S); Peter p. 237; AMNG III-2 p. 147, 17 var. (monograms), VF, nice green patina, monograms and inscription not fully struck, weight 8.717 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 315o, Kypsela (near Ipsala, Turkey) mint, c. 255 - 245 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse tripod lebes, HP over AΣ monograms downward on left, A∆AIOY downward on right; scarce; $100.00 (101.00)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior

|Nikopolis|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Nikopolis| |ad| |Istrum,| |Moesia| |Inferior||assarion|
A crescent with horns up with a star or stars above and within probably represents a solar eclipse.
RP110612. Bronze assarion, H-H-J Nikopolis 8.14.48.29, Varbanov I 2410, AMNG I/I 1435, Moushmov 986, SNG Cop -, BMC Thrace -, VF, green patina, full legends, edge a little ragged, weight 4.114 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 30o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, obverse AV K Λ - CEVHPOC, laureate head right; reverse NIKOΠOΛITΩN ΠPOC ICTP, three stars above and within a crescent with horns up; $100.00 (101.00)


Kingdom of Thrace, Rhoemetalces I, c. 11 B.C. - 12 A.D., Augustus Reverse

|Kingdom| |of| |Thrace|, |Kingdom| |of| |Thrace,| |Rhoemetalces| |I,| |c.| |11| |B.C.| |-| |12| |A.D.,| |Augustus| |Reverse||AE| |23|NEW
When the Cotys VII, King of Thrace, died about 48 B.C. Rhoemetalces I became the guardian of his nephew Rhescuporis I, his brother's young son and heir. In 13 B.C., Rhescuporis I was defeated and slain in battle by Vologases, chief of the Thracian Bessi, who was leading a revolt against Rome. As Rhescuporis I had left no heir, Rhoemetalces became king. An ally of Augustus, the Roman Historian Tacitus described Rhoemetalces as attractive and civilized. After his death, Augustus divided his realm, half for his son Cotys VIII and the other half for Rhoemetalces' brother Rhescuporis II. Tacitus states that Cotys received the cultivated parts, most towns and most Greek cities of Thrace, while Rhescuporis received the wild and savage portion with enemies on its frontier.
GB110716. Bronze AE 23, Youroukova 204; RPC I 1711; SNG Cop 1188; SNG Tbingen 972; BMC Thrace p. 209, 4; Weber 2743, VF, green patina, porosity, weight 9.792 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 180o, obverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ POIMHTAΛKOY, jugate heads of Rhoemetalces I, diademed, and Queen Pythodoris right; reverse KAIΣAPOΣ ΣEBAΣTOY, bare head of Augustus right; $100.00 (101.00)




  







Catalog current as of Thursday, March 23, 2023.
Page created in 2.235 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity