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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Thrace & Moesia||View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Greek Coins from Thrace and Moesia
Lysimacheia, Thracian Chersonese, c. 225 - 198 B.C.

|Lysimacheia|, |Lysimacheia,| |Thracian| |Chersonese,| |c.| |225| |-| |198| |B.C.||AE| |23|
Lysimachia was built by Lysimachus in 309 B.C. On the isthmus, it commanded the road from Sestos and mainland Thrace. To obtain inhabitants for his new city, Lysimachus destroyed neighboring Cardia and settled the inhabitants of it and other Chersonese cities here. Lysimachus made Lysimachia the capital of his kingdom and it must have rapidly risen to great splendor and prosperity.

Almost every example of this type known to Forum has the lion head countermark on the obverse.
CM97507. Bronze AE 23, SNG Cop 904 (same countermarks); BMC Thrace p. 195, 3; HGC 3.2 1495 (R1), aVF, dark patina with lighter blue highlighting, overstruck(?), weight 8.961 g, maximum diameter 23.3 mm, die axis 0o, Antiochia ad Maeandrum (near Basaran Turkey) mint, c. 225 - 199/8 B.C.; obverse head of young Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; countermark: lion's head facing with mane around in round punch; reverse ΛYΣIMA-XEΩN, Artemis standing right, wearing short chiton, quiver and bow over shoulder, holding long torch (two torches?) with both hands; countermark: head of grain in oval punch; from the Michael Arslan Collection; rare; $250.00 (€205.00)


Die Frühe Münzprägung Vom Kimmerschen Bosporus

|Numismatic| |Books|, |Die| |Frühe| |Münzprägung| |Vom| |Kimmerschen| |Bosporus|
The early coinage of the Cimmerian Bosporus (mid-6th to early 4th century BC): The coins of the cities Pantikapaion, Theodosia, Nymphaion, and Phanagoria, and also the Sindi.
BK13181. Die Frühe Münzprägung Vom Kimmerschen Bosporus by Nina A Frolova, 2004, in German, 100 pages, new; $200.00 (€164.00)


The Coinage of Messambria Volume I

|Mesembria|, |The| |Coinage| |of| |Messambria| |Volume| |I|
Silver and Gold Coins of Mesambria. Thracia Pontica Series IV. Thracia Maritima, Corpus Numorum.
BK13345. The Coinage of Messambria Volume I: Silver and Gold Coins of Mesambria by Ivan Karayotov, 1994, 134 pages, 4 plates, map, new; $140.00 (€114.80)


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C.

|Ptolemaic| |Egypt|, |Ptolemaic| |Kingdom| |of| |Egypt,| |Ptolemy| |II| |Philadelphos,| |285| |-| |246| |B.C.||AE| |17|
Most finds of this type are from Bulgaria, suggesting a mint in Thrace. This type is found both with and without central depressions, indicating it was struck both before and after the coinage reform of 265 B.C., after which central depressions (dimples) became a feature of Ptolemaic coinage. This example is pre-reform.
GP86417. Bronze AE 17, Svoronos 351, SNG Cop 100, Lorber CPE B310 var. (post reform), SNG Milan -, Weiser -, Noeske -, BMC Ptolemies -, Malter -, aVF, obv. die break from nose to edge, rev. well centered on a tight flan, bumps, marks, corrosion, without central cavities, weight 5.472 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 270o, uncertain (Thracian?) mint, pre-reform, 285 - 265 B.C.; obverse veiled and diademed bust of Arsinoe II right; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King Ptolemy), eagle standing left on fulmen (thunderbolt), head left, wings open, ∆I over (AX monogram) left; see CNG e-auction 92 (23 Jun 2004), lot 64, for another specimen with the same obverse die break; rare; $140.00 (€114.80)


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Serdica, Thrace

|Serdica|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Serdica,| |Thrace||AE| |30|
Serdica prospered under Rome. Turrets, protective walls, public baths, administrative and cult buildings, a civic basilica and a large amphitheater were built. When Diocletian divided Dacia into Dacia Ripensis (on the banks of the Danube) and Dacia Mediterranea, Serdica became the capital of Dacia Mediterranea. The city was destroyed by the Huns in 447, but was rebuilt by Justinian and surrounded with great fortress walls whose remnants can still be seen today. Although also often destroyed by the Slavs, the town remained under Byzantine dominion until 809. Serdica is today Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria.
RP96862. Bronze AE 30, H-J Serdica 12.18.34.4 (R6), Varbanov III 2299 (R5), Ruzicka Serdica 346, Moushmov Serdica 278, aVF, well centered, green patina, central depressions, weight 16.845 g, maximum diameter 31.6 mm, die axis 0o, Serdica (Sofia, Bulgaria) mint, 198 - 217 A.D.; obverse AVT K M AVPH CEVH ANTΩNEINOC, laureate head right; reverse OVΛΠIAC CEP∆IKHC, emperor on horseback galloping right, mantle flowing behind, thrusting with javelin at enemy wearing Phrygian cap crouching to right below; ex Trusted Coins, big 31.6 mm coin; scarce; $120.00 (€98.40)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior

|Nikopolis|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Nikopolis| |ad| |Istrum,| |Moesia| |Inferior||assarion|
Nicopolis ad Istrum was founded by Trajan around 101-106, at the junction of the Iatrus (Yantra) and the Rositsa rivers, in memory of his victory over the Dacians. Its ruins are located at the village of Nikyup, 20 km north of Veliko Tarnovo in northern Bulgaria. The town peaked during the reigns of Trajan, Hadrian, the Antonines and the Severan dynasty. In 447, Nicopolis was destroyed by Attila's Huns. In the 6th century, it was rebuilt as a powerful fortress enclosing little more than military buildings and churches, following a very common trend for the cities of that century in the Danube area. It was finally destroyed by the Avar invasions at the end of the 6th century.
RP97502. Bronze assarion, H-H-J Nikopolis 8.14.54.9 (R3), Varbanov I 2349 (R3), AMNG I 1447 var. (rev. ends / IC), Moushmov 975 var. (leg. in 3 lines), SNG Cop -, BMC Thrace -, VF, slight double strike on the obverse, minor porosity, off center on an irregularly shaped flan, weight 2.956 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 195o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, 9 Apr 193 - 4 Feb 211 A.D.; obverse AV K Λ C CEVHPOC, laureate head right; reverse NIKO/ΠOΛIT / ΠPOC / I in four lines within laurel wreath; from the Michael Arslan Collection; scarce; $100.00 (€82.00)


Lysimacheia, Thracian Chersonese, c. 245 - 225 B.C.

|Lysimacheia|, |Lysimacheia,| |Thracian| |Chersonese,| |c.| |245| |-| |225| |B.C.||AE| |17|
Lysimachia was built by Lysimachus in 309 B.C. On the isthmus, it commanded the road from Sestos and mainland Thrace. To obtain inhabitants for his new city, Lysimachus destroyed neighboring Cardia and settled the inhabitants of it and other Chersonese cities here. Lysimachus made Lysimachia the capital of his kingdom and it must have rapidly risen to great splendor and prosperity.
GB97279. Bronze AE 17, SNG Cop 914 ff.; BMC Thrace p. 195, 5; Weber 2454; HGC 3.2 1500 (S), VF, nice green patina, porosity, reverse a little off center, weight 3.665 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 180o, Lysimacheia (Eksemil, Turkey) mint, c. 245 - 225 B.C.; obverse head of young Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Nike standing facing, head left, raising wreath in right hand, ΛYΣIMAXEΩN starting downward on left, curving and ending below, monograms (controls) on right; scarce; $90.00 (€73.80)


Olbia, Sarmatia, c. 5th Century B.C.

|Olbia|, |Olbia,| |Sarmatia,| |c.| |5th| |Century| |B.C.||cast| |dolphin|
Small cast dolphins were cast in Olbia, beginning 550 - 525 B.C., first as sacrificial objects for worship of Apollo and later as a form of currency.
GA96585. Bronze cast dolphin, cf. SNG BM 369 ff., SNG Stancomb 339, SNG Pushkin 21 ff., SNG Cop 69 (all with normal ΘY reverse); 0.828g, 17.4mm long, VF, green patina, earthen encrustations, nose chipped, Olbia (Parutino, Ukraine) mint, c. 5th Century B.C.; obverse dolphin with raised dorsal fin, no tail; reverse YΘ (retrograde ΘY); very rare with retrograde reverse; $85.00 (€69.70)


Sabina, Augusta 128 - c. 136 A.D., Perinthos, Thrace

|Perinthus|, |Sabina,| |Augusta| |128| |-| |c.| |136| |A.D.,| |Perinthos,| |Thrace||AE| |20|
Perinthos, later called Heraclea and Marmara Eregli today, is 90 km west of Istanbul near a small pointed headland on the north shore of the Marmara Sea. It is said to have been a Samian colony, founded about 599 B.C. It is famous chiefly for its stubborn and successful resistance to Philip II of Macedon in 340 B.C.; at that time it seems to have been more important than Byzantium itself.
RP92875. Bronze AE 20, CN Online Perinthos CN_4717, Schonert Perinthos 380, Varbanov III 100 (R6), BMC Thrace -, SNG Cop -, VF, green patina, well centered on a tight flan, small edge splits, porosity, weight 5.147 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 0o, Heraclea Perinthos (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 128 - c. 136 A.D.; obverse CABINA - CEBACTH, draped bust right; reverse Π-EPIN-ΘIWN, Demeter standing left, two stalks of grain in right hand, long torch vertical behind in left hand; $80.00 (€65.60)


Kingdom of Bosporus, Sauromates I, c. 93 - 123 A.D.

|Bosporan| |Kingdom|, |Kingdom| |of| |Bosporus,| |Sauromates| |I,| |c.| |93| |-| |123| |A.D.||48| |nummi|
Tiberius Julius Sauromates I Philocaesar Philoromaios Eusebes (his epithets mean, lover of Caesar, lover of Rome, and the Pius) was the Roman Client King of the Bosporan Kingdom. Through his paternal grandfather, Sauromates I was a descendant of Mark Antony. Through his paternal grandfather, Sauromates I was a descendant of Greek Macedonian Kings: Antigonus I Monophthalmus, Seleucus I Nicator and Regent, Antipater. He was also a descendant of Roman Client Rulers Polemon I of Pontus, Pythodorida of Pontus and Cotys VIII of Thrace and and from the Monarchs Mithridates VI of Pontus and his first wife, his sister Laodice and the previous Bosporan King Asander.
GB93819. Bronze 48 nummi, RPC Online III 860 (16 spec.); MacDonald Bosporus 398/6; Anokhin 454; Frolova Coinage, p. 124. 3, aVF, dark garnet patina with highlighting earthen deposits, weight 14.001 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 0o, 4th series, 3rd group, c. 108 - 115 A.D.; obverse BACIΛEWC CAYPOMTOY, diademed and draped bust right; reverse MH (48 nummi) within wreath; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $80.00 (€65.60)




  







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