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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Thrace & Moesia||View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Greek Coins from Thrace and Moesia
Celts, Carpathian Region, The Dacian Costoboci(?), c. 2nd Century B.C., Imitative of Philip II of Macedonia

|Celtic| |&| |Tribal|, |Celts,| |Carpathian| |Region,| |The| |Dacian| |Costoboci(?),| |c.| |2nd| |Century| |B.C.,| |Imitative| |of| |Philip| |II| |of| |Macedonia||tetradrachm|
The Dacian Costoboci were an ancient people located, during the Roman imperial era, north of Dacia (probably north-east of Dacia), between the Carpathian Mountains and the river Dniester. During the Marcomannic Wars the Costoboci invaded the Roman empire in 170 or 171 A.D., pillaging its Balkan provinces as far as central Greece, until they were driven out by the Romans. Shortly afterwards, the Costoboci's territory was invaded and occupied by Vandal Hasdingi and the Costoboci disappeared from surviving historical sources, except for a mention by the late Roman Ammianus Marcellinus, writing around 400 A.D.
CE99269. Silver tetradrachm, Schnabelpferd type, imitative of Philip II of Macedon; CCCBM I 78 - 79; Gbl OTA pl. 28, 326/1; Lanz 666, VF, toned, marks, small spots of corrosion/encrustation, tight flan, domed obverse, weight 8.248 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 45o, northern Carpathian region mint, c. 2nd century B.C.; obverse Celticized laureate head of Zeus right; reverse Celticized naked youth on horse advancing left, "beak" horse head, rider reduced to dotted outline around curved line; $250.00 (237.50)


Die Frhe Mnzprgung Vom Kimmerschen Bosporus

|Numismatic| |Books|, |Die| |Frhe| |Mnzprgung| |Vom| |Kimmerschen| |Bosporus|
The early coinage of the Cimmerian Bosporus (mid-6th to early 4th century BC): The coins of the cities Pantikapaion, Theodosia, Nymphaion, and Phanagoria, and also the Sindi.
BK13181. Die Frhe Mnzprgung Vom Kimmerschen Bosporus by Nina A Frolova, 2004, in German, 100 pages, new; $200.00 (190.00)


Kingdom of Bithynia, Prusias II Kynegos, 185 - 149 B.C.

|Kingdom| |of| |Bithynia|, |Kingdom| |of| |Bithynia,| |Prusias| |II| |Kynegos,| |185| |-| |149| |B.C.||AE| |20|
Prusias II, son of Prusias I, inherited his father's name but not his character. He first joined with Eumenes of Pergamon in war against Pontus, but later turned on Pergamon and invaded. He was defeated and Pergamon demanded heavy reparations. Prusias sent his son Nicomedes II to Rome to ask for aid in reducing the payments. When Nicomedes revolted, Prusias II was murdered in the temple of Zeus at Nikomedia.

Like satyrs, centaurs were notorious for being wild, lusty, overly indulgent drinkers and carousers, violent when intoxicated, and generally uncultured delinquents. Chiron, by contrast, was intelligent, civilized and kind. He was not related directly to the other centaurs. He was the son of the Titan Cronus and the Oceanid Philyr. The other centaurs were spawned by the cloud Nephele on the slopes of Mount Pelion. Apollo taught the young Chiron the art of medicine, herbs, music, archery, hunting, gymnastics and prophecy, and made him rise above his beastly nature. He became a renowned teacher who mentored many of the greatest heroes of myth including the Argonauts Jason and Peleus, the physician Asklepios, and Achilles of Troy.
GB99271. Bronze AE 20, SNG Cop 639; BMC Pontus p. 211, 9; Rec Gen I p. 226, 26; HGC 7 629; SGCV II 7266, aVF, dark patina, spots of corrosion, reverse edge beveled, weight 5.240 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 0o, Nikomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, c. 180 - 150 B.C.; obverse head of young Dionysos right, wreathed with ivy; reverse centaur Chiron standing right, playing lyre, his animal skin cloak flying behind, monogram inner right under raised foreleg, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right, ΠPOYΣIOY downward on left; $160.00 (152.00)


Celtic, Pannonian, or Thracian Tribes, c. 180 - 35 B.C., Imitative of Thessalonika, Macedonia

|Celtic| |&| |Tribal|, |Celtic,| |Pannonian,| |or| |Thracian| |Tribes,| |c.| |180| |-| |35| |B.C.,| |Imitative| |of| |Thessalonika,| |Macedonia||AE| |20|
We do not know of another specimen similar to this. The identification of the prototype is clear. But the maker of this imitative is uncertain.
CE98465. Bronze AE 20, for prototype see AMNG III/2, 21; SNG ANS 804; HGC 3.1 743 (Thessalonika), VF, green patina, earthen deposits, weight 6.177 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 0o, tribal mint, c. 180 - 35 B.C.; obverse bearded Janiform head; reverse abstract design imitative of two centaurs back to back rearing outwards from center, completely abstract imitation of inscriptions above and below; $150.00 (142.50)


The Coinage of Messambria Volume I

|Mesembria|, |The| |Coinage| |of| |Messambria| |Volume| |I|
Silver and Gold Coins of Mesambria. Thracia Pontica Series IV. Thracia Maritima, Corpus Numorum.
BK13345. The Coinage of Messambria Volume I: Silver and Gold Coins of Mesambria by Ivan Karayotov, 1994, 134 pages, 4 plates, map, new; $140.00 (133.00)


Thracians, Odrysian Kingdom, Seuthes III, c. 330 - 295 B.C.

|Kingdom| |of| |Thrace|, |Thracians,| |Odrysian| |Kingdom,| |Seuthes| |III,| |c.| |330| |-| |295| |B.C.||AE| |18|
Seuthes was the high priest of the Cabeiri, and the king of the Odrysian Thracians. He revolted against Macedonia about 325 B.C., after Alexander's governor Zopyrion was killed in battle against the Getae. Seuthes was apparently subdued by Antipater, but after Alexander died in 323 B.C. he again took up arms in opposition to the new governor Lysimachus. They fought to a draw and both withdrew, but ultimately Seuthes acknowledged Lysimachus' authority. In 320 B.C., Seuthes III moved the Odrysian kingdom to central Thrace and built his capital city at Seuthopolis. In 313 B.C. he supported Antigonus I against Lysimachus, occupying the passes of Mount Haemus, but was again defeated and forced to submit to Lysimachus. After Lysimachus died in 281 B.C., Thrace came under the suzerainty of Ptolemy Keraunos.|Head| of |Seuthes| |III|
GB99019. Bronze AE 18, SNG Cop 1073; Youroukova 80; SNG Stancomb 294 (six-pointed); Peter p. 182, 4 (eight-pointed); SNG BM Black Sea 319 var. (wreath vice star), aVF, green patina, light earthen deposits, small cut, porosity, weight 3.734 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 0o, Seuthopolis (near Kazanlak, Bulgaria) mint, c. 323 - 316 B.C.; obverse laureate, bearded head of Seuthus III right; reverse horseman cantering right, left foreleg raised, ΣEYΘOY above, five-pointed star below horse (control); scarce; $135.00 (128.25)


Amisos, Pontos, c. 85 - 65 B.C.

|Pontos|, |Amisos,| |Pontos,| |c.| |85| |-| |65| |B.C.||AE| |22|
Mithradates VI was king of Pontus c. 120 to 63 B.C. He was of both Greek and Persian origin, claiming descent from both Alexander the Great and King Darius I of Persia. Mithradates is remembered as one of Rome's most formidable and successful enemies, who engaged three of the most prominent generals of the late Roman Republic in the so-called Mithridatic Wars: Sulla, Lucullus, and Pompey the Great. After Mithradates VI was at last defeated by Pompey and in danger of capture by Rome, he attempted suicide. The poison failed because he had taken daily doses to build immunity. He then made his bodyguard and friend, Bituitus, kill him by the sword.
GB98885. Bronze AE 22, SNG BM 1202; SNG Stancomb 697; Rec Gen p. 53, 24; HGC 7 243, gVF, toned bronze, light porosity/corrosion, weight 7.641 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 0o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, c. 85 - 65 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right (with the features of Mithradates VI?), wearing ivy wreath; reverse cista mystica, on which rests panther skin and thyrsos, AMIΣOY below, monogram left; $100.00 (95.00)


Mesembria, Thrace, 300 - 250 B.C.

|Mesembria|, |Mesembria,| |Thrace,| |300| |-| |250| |B.C.||AE| |20|
The wheel on the reverse is depicted with a degree of perspective, which is unusual on ancient coins.

(sampi) was an archaic Greek letter used between the 7th and the middle of the 5th centuries B.C., probably to denote some type of a sibilant (hissing) ΣΣ or TΣ sound, and was abandoned when the sound disappeared from Greek. The name sampi is of medieval origin. The letter's original name in antiquity is not known. Its use has been attested at the Ionian cities Miletus, Ephesos, Halikarnassos, Erythrae, and Teos, at the Ionian colony of Massalia in Gaul, on the island of Samos, and at Kyzikos, Mysia. At Mesembria, on the Black Sea coast of Thrace, it was used on coins in an abbreviation of the city's name, spelled META. In a famous painted black figure amphora from c. 615 B.C., known as the "Nessos amphora," the inscribed name of the eponymous centaur Nessus is rendered in the irregular spelling NETOΣ.
GB98883. Bronze AE 20, SNG Stancomb 229, SNG Cop 658, SNG BM 276 var. (helmet left), gF, weight 6.780 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 0o, Mesambria (Nesebar, Bulgaria) mint, 300 - 250 B.C.; obverse Thracian helmet with cheek guard right; reverse wheel with hub and four spokes, METAM/BPIANΩN (T = archaic Greek letter sampi = ΣΣ) divided, above and below; rare; $90.00 (85.50)


Mesembria, Thrace, 300 - 250 B.C.

|Mesembria|, |Mesembria,| |Thrace,| |300| |-| |250| |B.C.||AE| |22|
The wheel on the reverse is depicted with a degree of perspective, which is unusual on ancient coins.

(sampi) was an archaic Greek letter used between the 7th and the middle of the 5th centuries B.C., probably to denote some type of a sibilant (hissing) ΣΣ or TΣ sound, and was abandoned when the sound disappeared from Greek. The name sampi is of medieval origin. The letter's original name in antiquity is not known. Its use has been attested at the Ionian cities Miletus, Ephesos, Halikarnassos, Erythrae, and Teos, at the Ionian colony of Massalia in Gaul, on the island of Samos, and at Kyzikos, Mysia. At Mesembria, on the Black Sea coast of Thrace, it was used on coins in an abbreviation of the city's name, spelled META. In a famous painted black figure amphora from c. 615 B.C., known as the "Nessos amphora," the inscribed name of the eponymous centaur Nessus is rendered in the irregular spelling NETOΣ.
GB98884. Bronze AE 22, SNG Stancomb 229, SNG Cop 658, SNG BM 276 var. (helmet left), aVF, porous, oval flan, weight 4.457 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, Mesambria (Nesebar, Bulgaria) mint, 300 - 250 B.C.; obverse Thracian helmet with cheek guard right; reverse wheel with hub and four spokes, METAM/BPIANΩN (T = archaic Greek letter sampi = ΣΣ) divided, above and below; rare; $90.00 (85.50)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior

|Nikopolis|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Nikopolis| |ad| |Istrum,| |Moesia| |Inferior||assarion|
Nicopolis ad Istrum was founded by Trajan around 101-106, at the junction of the Iatrus (Yantra) and the Rositsa rivers, in memory of his victory over the Dacians. Its ruins are located at the village of Nikyup, 20 km north of Veliko Tarnovo in northern Bulgaria. The town peaked during the reigns of Trajan, Hadrian, the Antonines and the Severan dynasty. In 447, Nicopolis was destroyed by Attila's Huns. In the 6th century, it was rebuilt as a powerful fortress enclosing little more than military buildings and churches, following a very common trend for the cities of that century in the Danube area. It was finally destroyed by the Avar invasions at the end of the 6th century.
RP97502. Bronze assarion, H-H-J Nikopolis 8.14.54.9 (R3), Varbanov I 2349 (R3), AMNG I 1447 var. (rev. ends / IC), Moushmov 975 var. (leg. in 3 lines), SNG Cop -, BMC Thrace -, VF, slight double strike on the obverse, minor porosity, off center on an irregularly shaped flan, weight 2.956 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 195o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, 9 Apr 193 - 4 Feb 211 A.D.; obverse AV K Λ C CEVHPOC, laureate head right; reverse NIKO/ΠOΛIT / ΠPOC / I in four lines within laurel wreath; from the Michael Arslan Collection; scarce; $80.00 (76.00)




  







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