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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Phrygia||View Options:  |  |  | 

Phrygia

Phrygia lies in western central Anatolia (Asia Minor) between Bithynia, Mysia, Lydia, Pisidia, and Galatia. The cities were found in the valleys and high plains between the many high mountains of the land. The native Phrygians, whose inscriptions have not yet been deciphered, fell under Lydian, then Persian, then Macedonian rule. Greek and Macedonian settlers were planted in Phrygia by the Seleucids and Attalids in a mutual rivalry, but northern Phrygia was overrun by Celts (eventually it would become Galatia). After the defeat of Antiochus at Magnesia, Phrygia was assigned to the kingdom of Pergamum in 188 B.C., after which it became intensely Hellenized and first struck coins. Rome took control, along with the rest of the Pergamene kingdom, in 133 B.C.

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Apameia, Phrygia

|Apameia|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Apameia,| |Phrygia||hemiassarion|NEW
While playing the flute Athena saw her reflection in the water and disturbed by how her cheeks looked, puffed up while playing, threw away the instrument in disgust. The satyr Marsyas picked up the flute and since it had once been inspired by the breath of a goddess, it played beautifully on its own accord. Elated by his success, Marsyas challenged Apollo to a musical contest. For the prize, the victor could do what he pleased with the vanquished. The Muses were the umpires. Apollo played the cithara and Marsyas the flute. Only after Apollo added his voice to the music of his lyre was the contest decided in his favor. As a just punishment for the presumption of Marsyas, Apollo bound him to an evergreen tree and flayed him alive. His blood was the source of the river Marsyas, and Apollo hung up his skin, like a wine bag, in the cave out of which that river flows.
RP97259. Brass hemiassarion, RPC Online III 2585 (14 spec); BMC Phrygia p. 95, 152; SNG Mun XXIV 154; SNG Tub VI 3983; SNG Hunt I 2028, Weber III 7035, VF, attractive style, well centered and struck on a tight flan, nice green patina, light marks, weight 4.410 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 180o, Phrygia, Apameia (Dinar, Turkey) mint, 11 Aug 117 - 10 Jul 138 A.D.; obverse AY KAI TP A∆PIANOC, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front; reverse MAPCY/AC (upward on left last two letters in left field), AΠAME/ΩN (downward on right, last two letters in right field), satyr Marsyas walking right, nude but for nebris (skin of a fawn) tied on his neck and flying behind, playing Athena's double flute; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 92 (2 Aug 2020), lot 520; $220.00 (€180.40)


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Sebaste, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Augustus,| |16| |January| |27| |B.C.| |-| |19| |August| |14| |A.D.,| |Sebaste,| |Phrygia||AE| |14|NEW
Sebaste was a town of Phrygia Pacatiana in ancient Phrygia, inhabited in Roman and Byzantine times. It was located between Alydda and Eumenia. It was the seat of a Christian bishop, mentioned by Hierocles, and in the Acts of the Council of Constantinople, which its bishop attended. Its site is located at Selçikler in Asiatic Turkey.
RP97258. Bronze AE 14, RPC Online I 3154 (8 spec.); Waddington 6480; Imhoof-Blumer MG p. 411, 148 corr. (inscription magistrate's name); SNGvA -; SNG Cop -; BMC Phrygia -, F, porous, weight 2.264 g, maximum diameter 14.0 mm, die axis 0o, Sebaste (Selcikler, Turkey) mint, magistrate Sosthenes; obverse ΣEBAΣTOΣ, bare head right, lituus right before neck; reverse nude male figure (Zeus?) standing left, scepter in right hand, ΣΩΣΘENHΣ downward on left, ΣEBAΣTHNΩN downward on right; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 78 (2 Jun 2019), lot 604; this coin is one of only three specimens of this type listed in Coin Archives auction records spanning the last two decades; very rare; $200.00 (€164.00)


Hierapolis, Phrygia, in Homonoia with Ephesos, 253 - 260 A.D.

|Hierapolis|, |Hierapolis,| |Phrygia,| |in| |Homonoia| |with| |Ephesos,| |253| |-| |260| |A.D.||diassarion|NEW
The title NEOKOPON on the reverse of this type, and other similar coins, has been the topic of debate for more than a century. Hierapolis was honored with a neokoros (imperial temple) either during the reign of Caracalla or Elagabalus. Caracalla rarely gave this honor, but if the honor was given by Caracalla, it would have lasted many decades. If the honor was given during the reign of Elagabalus, as many numismatists and historians believe, it would have been lost with his damnatio. Yet, the title appears here, on a coin struck long after Elagabalus' demise. This coin, however, was struck by Hierapolis honoring its alliance (homonoia) with Ephesos, Ionia. After Elagabalus, at Hierapolis, neokoros titles only appear on homonoia coinage. It seems odd, especially since the title is on the reverse with the name Hierapolis, but the most supported argument is that NEOKOPON refers to a temple at Ephesos, not one at Hierapolis.
RP97256. Bronze diassarion, Franke-Nolle, type IX, 760 - 763 (B/49); Weber HpH p. 74 (A/b); Johnston Hierapolis -; BMC Phrygia -; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; SNG Mün -; SNG Tüb -, gVF, well centered and struck with full legends, nice dark green patina, some porosity, weight 5.120 g, maximum diameter 23.5 mm, die axis 180o, Phrygia, Hierapolis (near Pamukkale, Turkey) mint, time of Valerius and Gallienus, 253 - 260 A.D.; obverse OMONY/A - K EΦEC-IΩN (clockwise from 3:00), laureate, veiled, and draped bust of Boule right; reverse IEPAΠ-O-ΛEITΩN; NEOKO-PΩN in fields, clockwise from lower left, Nike advancing left, wreath in extended right hand, palm frond against left shoulder in left hand; ex Leu Numismatik web auction 13 (15 August 2020), lot 886; this coin is one of only two specimens of this type listed in Coin Archives auction records spanning the last two decades; very rare; $180.00 (€147.60)


Eumeneia, Phrygia, c. 244 - 249 A.D.

|Eumeneia|, |Eumeneia,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |244| |-| |249| |A.D.||AE| |23|NEW
Eumenia, Phrygia was founded by Attalus II Philadelphus (159 - 138 B.C.) at the source of the Cludrus, near the Glaucus, and named after his brother Eumenes. Numerous inscriptions and many coins remain to show that Eumenia was an important and prosperous city under Roman rule. As early as the third century its population was in great part Christian, and it seems to have suffered much during the persecution of Diocletian. The remains of Eumenia are located in Denizli Province, Turkey on the shore of Lake Isikli near Civril.
RP97255. Bronze AE 23, RPC Online VIII U20608 (8 spec., 2 var.); BMC Phrygia p. 214, 24; Lindgren III 583; SNG Cop 389 var. (leg. from upper r.); SNGvA 3586 var. (same), VF, green patina, rough areas, scattered porosity, weight 7.002 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 180o, Eumeneia (near Civril, Turkey) mint, reign of Philip I, c. 244 - 249 A.D.; obverse •IEPA• CVNKΛHTOC (clockwise from the lower left), bare-headed, draped bust of the Senate right; reverse EVMENEΩ-N AXAIΩN, cult image of Artemis Ephesia standing facing, wearing kalathos and veil, with arm supports, between two stags standing facing outward with heads turned back towards the goddess; ex Savoca Numismatik, silver auction 82 (26 Jul 2020), lot 247; this coin is the primary plate coin for the type in RPC Online VIII; rare; $170.00 (€139.40)


Cotiaeum, Phrygia, c. 235 - 238 A.D. Diogenes, Archon

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Cotiaeum,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |235| |-| |238| |A.D.| |Diogenes,| |Archon||diassarion|NEW
The image of Demos, the personification of the People, was used on ancient coinage as early as the 5th century B.C. In Roman times, many towns under Roman domination struck pseudo-autonomous coinage depicting either the bust or head of Demos, or showed him standing with the Emperor, Boule (the city council), or the Demos of another city.
RP97257. Bronze diassarion, SNG Cop 318 - 319; BMC Phrygia p. 162, 20, SNGvA 3776, SNG Righetti 1165, Kurth Demos 398, Martin Demos 16, VF, well centered on a broad flan, nice dark green patina, light earthen deposits, light marks, some die wear, weight 7.915 g, maximum diameter 25.8 mm, die axis 0o, Cotiaeum (Kütahya, Turkey) mint, time of Valerian I - Gallienus, c. 235 - 238 A.D.; obverse ∆HMOC (Demos) KOTIAEΩN, diademed bust of the Demos to right, slight drapery over far shoulder; reverse EΠI ∆IOΓENOVC ∆IONVCIOV (struck under Diogenes, son of Dionysios), Zeus seated left on a low backless throne, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, A-PX (archon - Diogenes' title) divided across fields, KOTIAEΩN in exergue; rare; $120.00 (€98.40)


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Aezani, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.,| |Aezani,| |Phrygia||AE| |18|
Aizanoi, Latinized as Aezani, was an Ancient Greek city in western Anatolia. Located in what is now Cavdarhisar, Kutahya Province, its ruins are situated astride the River Penkalas, some 1,000 meters above sea level. The city was an important political and economic center in Roman times. Surviving remains from the period include a well-preserved Temple of Zeus, unusual combined thereat-stadium complex, and macellum inscribed with the Price Edict of Diocletian. The city fell into decline in Late Antiquity. Later serving as a citadel, in 2012 the site was submitted for addition to the UNESCO World Heritage List.
RP93134. Bronze AE 18, BMC Phrygia p. 40, 125; Weber 706, SNG Hunterian I 2007, RPC Online IV T1684; SNG Cop 103 var. (obv. leg., crescent and star), aVF, crude style, die wear, minor encrustations, flan crack, weight 3.077 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 225o, Aezani (Cavdarhisar, Turkey) mint, 184 - 192 A.D.; obverse AV KAI KOMO∆OC, laureate head right, no trace of drapery; reverse AIZANEITΩN, cult statue of Artemis of Ephesus standing facing, with arm supports, kalathos on head, no flanking crescent and star; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $115.00 (€94.30)


Sabina, Augusta 128 - c. 136 A.D., Kibyra, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Sabina,| |Augusta| |128| |-| |c.| |136| |A.D.,| |Kibyra,| |Phrygia||AE| |18|
Kibyra (Cibyra) near the modern town of Gölhisar in south-west Turkey, was possibly originally settled by Lydians. The city was in the far south of Phrygia adjoining Lycia. It is uncertain whether the city was part of the Province of Asia or of Lycia in the early imperial period. According to Strabo, the Lydian language was still being spoken by a multicultural population in the 1st century B.C. Thus Kibyra was the last place where the Lydian culture, by then extinct in Lydia proper, persevered.
RP92640. Bronze AE 18, RPC Online III 2301 (3 spec.), SNG Leypold 1610, SNGvA -, BMC Phrygia -, aF, brassy surfaces with uneven partial toning, porosity, legends weak, weight 3.428 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 0o, Kibyra (near Golhisar, Turkey) mint, 128 - c. 136 A.D.; obverse CABEINA CEBACTH, diademed and draped bust right, hair coiled above double stephane; reverse KIBYPATΩM, Asclepius standing facing, head left, leaning on serpent-entwined staff; from the Errett Bishop Collection; very rare; $90.00 (€73.80)


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Eumeneia, Phrygia

|Eumeneia|, |Tiberius,| |19| |August| |14| |-| |16| |March| |37| |A.D.,| |Eumeneia,| |Phrygia||AE| |18|
Eumenia, Phrygia was founded by Attalus II Philadelphus (159 - 138 B.C.) at the source of the Cludrus, near the Glaucus, and named after his brother Eumenes. Numerous inscriptions and many coins remain to show that Eumenia was an important and prosperous city under Roman rule. As early as the third century its population was in great part Christian, and it seems to have suffered much during the persecution of Diocletian. The remains of Eumenia are located in Denizli Province, Turkey on the shore of Lake Isikli near Civril.
RP96118. Bronze AE 18, RPC I 3147; SNG Munchen 206; SNG Cop 391; SNGvA 3589; Waddington 6026; BMC Phrygia p. 216, 37 corr., VF, nice dark green patina, porosity, off center, weight 5.175 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 0o, Eumeneia (near Civril, Turkey) mint, magistrate Kleon Agapetos, 19 Aug 14 - 16 Mar 37; obverse ΣEBAΣTOΣ, laureate head right; reverse Zeus standing facing, head left, wearing himation, phiale in right hand, resting left hand on scepter, star above crescent with horns up on left; KΛEΩN / AΓAPHTOC / EUME-NEΩN (Kleon Agapetos [magistrate], in three downward lines the first two on the right, the last on the left); ex Savoca blue auction 30 (21 Mar 2020), lot 1313; scarce; $90.00 (€73.80)










REFERENCES|

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