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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Olympians| ▸ |Artemis or Diana||View Options:  |  |  | 

Artemis or Diana

Virgin goddess of the hunt and the moon. Symbols include the deer and the bow. Twin sister of Apollo. Daughter of Zeus and Leto.

Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Ephesos, Ionia

|Ephesos|, |Severus| |Alexander,| |13| |March| |222| |-| |March| |235| |A.D.,| |Ephesos,| |Ionia||AE| |36|
See this type online:
RPC Online VI
Asia Minor Coins
ANS Mantis (No photo on ANS, but photo of this specimen is available on RPC Online.)
SH87621. Bronze AE 36, Karwiese MvE 5.2 p. 164, 750b (O3/R3, only 1 spec. of this variety); RPC Online VI T4956 (5 spec.); ANS Mantis 1972.185.5, Choice EF, excellent centering, olive green patina, some legend weak, small flaw/punch on reverse, porous, weight 25.344 g, maximum diameter 36.3 mm, die axis 180o, Ephesos mint, obverse AYT K M AYP CEB AΛEΞAN∆POC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse M-ONΩN - ΠPΩTΩN - ACIAC, on left: cult statue of Artemis standing facing, wearing ornate kalathos, flanked on each side by a stag, arms with supports; on right: Demeter enthroned left, wreathed in grain, two stalks of grain in right hand, long torch vertical in left hand; EΦECIΩN in exergue; only the second known of this variety with stags flanking Artemis, fantastic HUGE 36mm provincial bronze!; $2100.00 (€1722.00)
 


Seleukid Kingdom, Demetrius III, c. 96 - 87 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Demetrius| |III,| |c.| |96| |-| |87| |B.C.||tetradrachm|
The inscription on the reverse of this coin translates, "King Demetrios, the god, father-loving, savior." He was nicknamed Eucaerus ("the Timely") by the Syrian Greeks but was called Acaerus ("the Untimely) by the Jews. He defeated the Hasmonaean priest king Alexander Jannaeus but was forced to withdraw from Judaea by the hostile population. While attempting to dethrone his brother, Philip I Philadelphus, he was defeated by the Arabs and Parthians, and taken prisoner. He was held in confinement in Parthia by Mithridates II until his death in 88 B.C.
SL94920. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber 2450(2); HGC 9 1305; cf. BMC Seleucid p. 101, 1 (SE 217, same controls); SNG Spaer 2863 (SE 219, different controls), NGC Ch XF, strike 5/5, surface 3/5 (5771210-005), weight 16.501 g, maximum diameter 30.10 mm, die axis 0o, Damaskos (Damascus, Syria) mint, 97 - 96 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Demetrios III right, fringe of curly beard at jawline, fillet border; reverse BAΣIΛEΩS / DHMHTPIOY / ΘEOY - ΦIΛOΠATOPOΣ / ΣΩTHPOΣ, cult image of Atargatis standing facing, holding flower, barley stalk behind each shoulder, two monograms (controls) outer left, date CIS (Seleucid Era year 216) in exergue, ∆H monogram (control) in exergue on right, laurel wreath border; from the Ray Nouri Collection, NGC| Lookup; scarce; $900.00 (€738.00)
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||sestertius|
A coin this beautiful might sell for twice this price or more. This coin, however, was expertly smoothed and has an enhanced artificial patina. Here at FORVM we inform you of this issue, which might go unsubscribed by some sellers. This smoothing and patina were probably made necessary by active corrosion. It should be maintained in a climate controlled environment, waxed occasionally, and is at risk of returning active corrosion. This bargain priced coin is sold, as is, no returns.
SH98432. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II-3 2398, BMCRE III 1545, Strack II 702, Cohen II 1364, Banti 710, SRCV II 3645, Hunter II 561, VF, excellent portrait, well centered and struck, smoothing, enhanced patina, at risk for active corrosion - sold as is, no returns, weight 24.764 g, maximum diameter 31.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 137 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse Diana standing left, arrow in right hand, bow in left, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field below center; sold as is, no returns; $500.00 (€410.00)
 


Eumeneia, Phrygia, c. 244 - 249 A.D.

|Eumeneia|, |Eumeneia,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |244| |-| |249| |A.D.||AE| |23|
Eumenia, Phrygia was founded by Attalus II Philadelphus (159 - 138 B.C.) at the source of the Cludrus, near the Glaucus, and named after his brother Eumenes. Numerous inscriptions and many coins remain to show that Eumenia was an important and prosperous city under Roman rule. As early as the third century its population was in great part Christian, and it seems to have suffered much during the persecution of Diocletian. The remains of Eumenia are located in Denizli Province, Turkey on the shore of Lake Isikli near Civril.
RP97255. Bronze AE 23, RPC Online VIII U20608 (8 spec., 2 var.); BMC Phrygia p. 214, 24; Lindgren III 583; SNG Cop 389 var. (leg. from upper r.); SNGvA 3586 var. (same), VF, green patina, rough areas, scattered porosity, weight 7.002 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 180o, Eumeneia (near Civril, Turkey) mint, reign of Philip I, c. 244 - 249 A.D.; obverse •IEPA• CVNKΛHTOC (clockwise from the lower left), bare-headed, draped bust of the Senate right; reverse EVMENEΩ-N AXAIΩN, cult image of Artemis Ephesia standing facing, wearing kalathos and veil, with arm supports, between two stags standing facing outward with heads turned back towards the goddess; ex Savoca Numismatik, silver auction 82 (26 Jul 2020), lot 247; this coin is the primary plate coin for the type in RPC Online VIII; rare; $170.00 (€139.40)
 


Faustina Junior, Augusta, 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Neapolis, Samaria, Syria Palestina

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Faustina| |Junior,| |Augusta,| |146| |-| |Winter| |175/176| |A.D.,| |Neapolis,| |Samaria,| |Syria| |Palestina||AE| |19|
The image on the reverse resembles sculptures of Artemis, the Lady of Ephesus, including one at the Ephesus Archaeological Museum and another at the Vatican. The Ionians worshiped Artemis as a mother goddess, akin to the Phrygian Cybele. Her cult image was adorned with multiple rounded breast like protuberances on her chest. They have been variously interpreted as accessory breasts, eggs, grapes, acorns, or even bull testes. Excavation at the site of the Artemision in 1987/8 found a multitude of tear-shaped amber beads that once adorned the ancient wooden xoanon.Artemis
RP98113. Bronze AE 19, Sofaer 59 (same dies); BMC Palestine p. 56, 69; Rosenberger III 19; RPC IV Online T6349 (8 specs); SNG Cop 17; de Saulcy p. 253, 5; SNG ANS -, nice gF, near black patina with red earthen highlighting, high points flat not fully struck, weight 6.831 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Neapolis (Nablus, Israel) mint, struck under Antoninus Pius, 161 - 162 A.D.; obverse ΦAVCTEINAN CEBACTHN, draped bust right, hair in chingon; reverse ΦΛ NEACΠOΛE CYPIAC ΠAΛ-AI (Flavia Neapolis Syria Palestina, the last two letter in exergue and smaller), cult statue of Artemis Ephesia standing facing, wearing headdress, two stags at feet, hands resting on supports, ET - Ч (year 90) divided across field above arms; ex Menashe Landman Collection; rare; $160.00 (€131.20)
 


Apameia, Phrygia, c. 88 - 40 B.C.

|Apameia|, |Apameia,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |88| |-| |40| |B.C.||AE| |16|NEW
While playing the flute Athena saw her reflection in the water and disturbed by how her cheeks looked, puffed up while playing, threw away the instrument in disgust. The satyr Marsyas picked up the flute and since it had once been inspired by the breath of a goddess, it played beautifully on its own accord. Elated by his success, Marsyas challenged Apollo to a musical contest. For the prize, the victor could do what he pleased with the vanquished. The Muses were the umpires. Apollo played the cithara and Marsyas the flute. Only after Apollo added his voice to the music of his lyre was the contest decided in his favor. As a just punishment for the presumption of Marsyas, Apollo bound him to an evergreen tree and flayed him alive. His blood was the source of the river Marsyas, and Apollo hung up his skin, like a wine bag, in the cave out of which that river flows.
GB97286. Bronze AE 16, BMC Phrygia p. 77, 47; SNG Cop 191; SNGvA 3472; SNG Tübingen 3973; HGC 7 674; SNG Munchen -, gF, green patina, porosity, corrosion, weight 4.413 g, maximum diameter 16.3 mm, die axis 0o, Phrygia, Apameia (Dinar, Turkey) mint, c. 88 - 40 B.C.; obverse turreted head of Artemis right, bow and quiver on shoulder behind; reverse satyr Marsyas walking right on a meander pattern, nude but for nebris (skin of a fawn) tied on his neck and flying behind, playing Athena's double flute, AΠAMEΩN downward on right, APIΣT / KHΦIΣ (Aristo... and Kephis...) magistrates' names in two downward lines on left; $50.00 (€41.00)
 


Magnesia ad Maeandrum, Ionia, c. 155 - 145 B.C.

|Magnesia| |ad| |Meandrum|, |Magnesia| |ad| |Maeandrum,| |Ionia,| |c.| |155| |-| |145| |B.C.||stephanophoric| |tetradrachm|
The magistrate's name is written EYΦHMOΣ ΠAYΣANIOY, with the last name in genitive, which means Euphemos was the son of Pausanios.
SH35578. Silver stephanophoric tetradrachm, BMC Ionia p. 162, 36; SNGvA 2042, SNG Cop -, superb EF, weight 16.836 g, maximum diameter 34.2 mm, die axis 0o, Magnesia ad Maeandrum (near Tekin, Turkey) mint, c. 160 - 150 B.C.; obverse bust of Artemis the Hunter wearing stephane, bow and quiver at shoulder; reverse MAΓNHTΩN / EYΦHMOΣ / ΠAYΣANIOY, Apollo naked standing half left, left arm resting on tripod, filleted branch in right hand, Maeander pattern below, magistrate's name with patronymic left, all within laurel wreath; luster, golden toning, wonderful style, beautiful!, ex CNG; SOLD


Marc Antony, Octavian and Lepidus, Triumvirs, 26 November 43 - 36 B.C.

|Marc| |Antony|, |Marc| |Antony,| |Octavian| |and| |Lepidus,| |Triumvirs,| |26| |November| |43| |-| |36| |B.C.||AE| |17|
RPC notes uncertainty regarding the reverse legend of this type. Apparently, none are fully and clearly legible. There is some question regarding the final Z. They note it may be Ξ. On our example however, it seems clearly to be Z.

The Second Triumvirate officially expired after two five-year terms in 33 B.C., but Octavian unilaterally expelled Lepidus in 36 B.C. While this effectively ended the three-man Triumvirate, Octavian and Mark Antony continued to serve as "triumvirs" despite their number.
SH60337. Bronze AE 17, RPC I 2573, BMCRR 194 corr., VF, nice for the type, weight 3.400 g, maximum diameter 16.6 mm, die axis 0o, Ephesos mint, 39 B.C.; obverse three jugate heads of the Triumvirs right; reverse APXIEPEYΣ ΓPAM ΓΛAYKΩN EΦE MAZAΣ, facing cult statue of Artemis with supports; attractive green patina, ex CNG; rare; SOLD


Mytilene, Lesbos, c. 377 - 326 B.C.

|Lesbos|, |Mytilene,| |Lesbos,| |c.| |377| |-| |326| |B.C.||hekte|
Mytilene was famous in ancient times for its great output of electrum coins struck from the late 6th through mid - 4th centuries B.C. The usual denomination was the hekte (1/6th stater). Warwick Wroth noted in the British Museum Catalog, "The Sixths of [this Lesbos electrum series] form one of the most beautiful coin-series of the ancient world. This will be evident from a glance."
SH81271. Electrum hekte, Bodenstedt 95, SNGvA 1717, gVF, weight 2.542 g, maximum diameter 10.5 mm, die axis 0o, Mytilene mint, c. 377 - 326 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse head of Artemis right, hair in sphendone, within linear square; SOLD


Domitia, Wife of Domitian, 81 - 96 A.D., Ephesos, Ionia in Homonoia with Smyrna

|Ephesos|, |Domitia,| |Wife| |of| |Domitian,| |81| |-| |96| |A.D.,| |Ephesos,| |Ionia| |in| |Homonoia| |with| |Smyrna||AE| |21|
The image on the reverse resembles sculptures of Artemis, the Lady of Ephesus, including one at the Ephesus Archaeological Museum and another at the Vatican. The Ionians worshiped Artemis as a mother goddess, akin to the Phrygian Cybele. Her cult image was adorned with multiple rounded breast like protuberances on her chest. They have been variously interpreted as accessory breasts, eggs, grapes, acorns, or even bull testes. Excavation at the site of the Artemision in 1987/8 found a multitude of tear-shaped amber beads that once adorned the ancient wooden xoanon.Artemis
RP91446. Bronze AE 21, RPC II 1083 (2 spec.), Franke-Nolle -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG Munchen -, BMC Ionia -, Stumpf -, Choice gF, excellent centering, attractive darker highlighting fields, light marks, light porosity, obverse die break at 8:00, weight 7.555 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 180o, Ephesos mint, proconsul P. Calvisius Ruso, c. 92 - 94 A.D.; obverse ∆OMITIA CEBACTH, draped bust right; reverse ANΘY POYCΩNOC OMONOIA (Anthypatos Ruso, alliance), facing cult statue of Artemis of Ephesos standing, wearing polos and veil, with arm supports, ZMYP (Smyrna) downward on left, EΦE (Ephesos) downward on right; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; zero sales of this type recorded on Coin Archives in the last two decades, only a few specimens known to exist; extremely rare; SOLD







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