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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Olympians| ▸ |Artemis or Diana||View Options:  |  |  | 

Artemis or Diana

Virgin goddess of the hunt and the moon. Symbols include the deer and the bow. Twin sister of Apollo. Daughter of Zeus and Leto.

Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Ephesos, Ionia

|Ephesos|, |Severus| |Alexander,| |13| |March| |222| |-| |March| |235| |A.D.,| |Ephesos,| |Ionia||AE| |36|
See this type online:
RPC Online VI
Asia Minor Coins
ANS Mantis (No photo on ANS, but photo of this specimen is available on RPC Online.)
SH87621. Bronze AE 36, Karwiese MvE 5.2 p. 164, 750b (O3/R3, only 1 spec. of this variety); RPC Online VI T4956 (5 spec.); ANS Mantis 1972.185.5, Choice EF, excellent centering, olive green patina, some legend weak, small flaw/punch on reverse, porous, weight 25.344 g, maximum diameter 36.3 mm, die axis 180o, Ephesos mint, obverse AYT K M AYP CEB AΛEΞAN∆POC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse M-ONΩN - ΠPΩTΩN - ACIAC, on left: cult statue of Artemis standing facing, wearing ornate kalathos, flanked on each side by a stag, arms with supports; on right: Demeter enthroned left, wreathed in grain, two stalks of grain in right hand, long torch vertical in left hand; EΦECIΩN in exergue; only the second known of this variety with stags flanking Artemis, fantastic HUGE 36mm provincial bronze!; $2100.00 (€1722.00)
 


Seleukid Kingdom, Demetrius III, c. 96 - 87 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Demetrius| |III,| |c.| |96| |-| |87| |B.C.||tetradrachm|
The inscription on the reverse of this coin translates, "King Demetrios, the god, father-loving, savior." He was nicknamed Eucaerus ("the Timely") by the Syrian Greeks but was called Acaerus ("the Untimely) by the Jews. He defeated the Hasmonaean priest king Alexander Jannaeus but was forced to withdraw from Judaea by the hostile population. While attempting to dethrone his brother, Philip I Philadelphus, he was defeated by the Arabs and Parthians, and taken prisoner. He was held in confinement in Parthia by Mithridates II until his death in 88 B.C.
SL94920. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber 2450(2); HGC 9 1305; cf. BMC Seleucid p. 101, 1 (SE 217, same controls); SNG Spaer 2863 (SE 219, different controls), NGC Ch XF, strike 5/5, surface 3/5 (5771210-005), weight 16.501 g, maximum diameter 30.10 mm, die axis 0o, Damaskos (Damascus, Syria) mint, 97 - 96 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Demetrios III right, fringe of curly beard at jawline, fillet border; reverse BAΣIΛEΩS / DHMHTPIOY / ΘEOY - ΦIΛOΠATOPOΣ / ΣΩTHPOΣ, cult image of Atargatis standing facing, holding flower, barley stalk behind each shoulder, two monograms (controls) outer left, date CIS (Seleucid Era year 216) in exergue, ∆H monogram (control) in exergue on right, laurel wreath border; from the Ray Nouri Collection, NGC| Lookup; scarce; $900.00 (€738.00)
 


Kingdom of Bithynia, Nikomedes I, c. 279 - 255 B.C.

|Kingdom| |of| |Bithynia|, |Kingdom| |of| |Bithynia,| |Nikomedes| |I,| |c.| |279| |-| |255| |B.C.||AE| |17|
Nicomedes I was the first King of Bithynia to strike coins. He is primarily known for bringing the Gauls known as Galatians to the Asia Minor in 277 B.C. to fight against his brother and Antiochus I. This short-sighted mistake brought troubles for local Greeks for a century. About 264 B.C., according to Eusebius, he moved the capital to Nicomedia on the Propontis. Mørkholm describes the very similar portrait of Nikomedes on his tetradrachms as "the realistic portrait of an aged king with large and rugged facial features."
GB96095. Bronze AE 17, Rec Gen I-2 p. 219, 4, & pl. 29, 5; HGC 7 609 (R2); SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; SNG Tub -; BMC Pontus -, F, scratches, corrosion, rough, weight 4.477 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 0o, c. 279 - 255 B.C.; obverse diademed head of the King right; reverse Warrior goddess Artemis-Bendis seated left on rock, two vertical spears in right hand, left hand resting on sword in sheath, circular shield on ground leaning on rock on near side, tree behind on far side of rock, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King) downward on right, NIKOMH∆OY (Nikomedes) downward on left, EP monogram outer left; only one sale of this type recorded on Coin Archives for the last two decades; extremely rare; $400.00 (€328.00)
 


Lysimacheia, Thracian Chersonese, c. 225 - 198 B.C.

|Lysimacheia|, |Lysimacheia,| |Thracian| |Chersonese,| |c.| |225| |-| |198| |B.C.||AE| |23|
Lysimachia was built by Lysimachus in 309 B.C. On the isthmus, it commanded the road from Sestos and mainland Thrace. To obtain inhabitants for his new city, Lysimachus destroyed neighboring Cardia and settled the inhabitants of it and other Chersonese cities here. Lysimachus made Lysimachia the capital of his kingdom and it must have rapidly risen to great splendor and prosperity.

Almost every example of this type known to Forum has the lion head countermark on the obverse.
CM97507. Bronze AE 23, SNG Cop 904 (same countermarks); BMC Thrace p. 195, 3; HGC 3.2 1495 (R1), aVF, dark patina with lighter blue highlighting, overstruck(?), weight 8.961 g, maximum diameter 23.3 mm, die axis 0o, Antiochia ad Maeandrum (near Basaran Turkey) mint, c. 225 - 199/8 B.C.; obverse head of young Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; countermark: lion's head facing with mane around in round punch; reverse ΛYΣIMA-XEΩN, Artemis standing right, wearing short chiton, quiver and bow over shoulder, holding long torch (two torches?) with both hands; countermark: head of grain in oval punch; from the Michael Arslan Collection; rare; $250.00 (€205.00)
 


Eumeneia, Phrygia, c. 244 - 249 A.D.

|Eumeneia|, |Eumeneia,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |244| |-| |249| |A.D.||AE| |23|NEW
Eumenia, Phrygia was founded by Attalus II Philadelphus (159 - 138 B.C.) at the source of the Cludrus, near the Glaucus, and named after his brother Eumenes. Numerous inscriptions and many coins remain to show that Eumenia was an important and prosperous city under Roman rule. As early as the third century its population was in great part Christian, and it seems to have suffered much during the persecution of Diocletian. The remains of Eumenia are located in Denizli Province, Turkey on the shore of Lake Isikli near Civril.
RP97255. Bronze AE 23, RPC Online VIII U20608 (8 spec., 2 var.); BMC Phrygia p. 214, 24; Lindgren III 583; SNG Cop 389 var. (leg. from upper r.); SNGvA 3586 var. (same), VF, green patina, rough areas, scattered porosity, weight 7.002 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 180o, Eumeneia (near Civril, Turkey) mint, reign of Philip I, c. 244 - 249 A.D.; obverse •IEPA• CVNKΛHTOC (clockwise from the lower left), bare-headed, draped bust of the Senate right; reverse EVMENEΩ-N AXAIΩN, cult image of Artemis Ephesia standing facing, wearing kalathos and veil, with arm supports, between two stags standing facing outward with heads turned back towards the goddess; ex Savoca Numismatik, silver auction 82 (26 Jul 2020), lot 247; this coin is the primary plate coin for the type in RPC Online VIII; rare; $170.00 (€139.40)
 


Faustina Junior, Augusta, 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Neapolis, Samaria, Syria Palestina

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Faustina| |Junior,| |Augusta,| |146| |-| |Winter| |175/176| |A.D.,| |Neapolis,| |Samaria,| |Syria| |Palestina||AE| |19|NEW
The image on the reverse resembles sculptures of Artemis, the Lady of Ephesus, including one at the Ephesus Archaeological Museum and another at the Vatican. The Ionians worshiped Artemis as a mother goddess, akin to the Phrygian Cybele. Her cult image was adorned with multiple rounded breast like protuberances on her chest. They have been variously interpreted as accessory breasts, eggs, grapes, acorns, or even bull testes. Excavation at the site of the Artemision in 1987/8 found a multitude of tear-shaped amber beads that once adorned the ancient wooden xoanon.Artemis
RP98113. Bronze AE 19, Sofaer 59 (same dies); BMC Palestine p. 56, 69; Rosenberger III 19; RPC IV Online T6349 (8 specs); SNG Cop 17; de Saulcy p. 253, 5; SNG ANS -, nice gF, near black patina with red earthen highlighting, high points flat not fully struck, weight 6.831 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Neapolis (Nablus, Israel) mint, struck under Antoninus Pius, 161 - 162 A.D.; obverse ΦAVCTEINAN CEBACTHN, draped bust right, hair in chingon; reverse ΦΛ NEACΠOΛE CYPIAC ΠAΛ-AI (Flavia Neapolis Syria Palestina, the last two letter in exergue and smaller), cult statue of Artemis Ephesia standing facing, wearing headdress, two stags at feet, hands resting on supports, ET - Ч (year 90) divided across field above arms; ex Menashe Landman Collection; rare; $160.00 (€131.20)
 


Maeonia, Lydia, c. 138 - 192 A.D.

|Other| |Lydia|, |Maeonia,| |Lydia,| |c.| |138| |-| |192| |A.D.||AE| |18|
Maionia (or Maeonia) was a city of the Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine era located near the Hermos River, in ancient Lydia. The town is mentioned by mentioned by Pliny the Elder, Hierocles, and in the Notitiae Episcopatuum. In antiquity the city was part of the Katakekaumene Decapolis of towns. Its site is near Menye in Asiatic Turkey.
RP97252. Bronze AE 18, GRPC Lydia III 59; RPC Online IV.2 T1318 (5 spec.); Waddington 5059; SNG Hunterian I 1988; SNG Soutzos 1522; BMC Lydia P 129, 14, gF, well centered, rough and porous, weight 2.858 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 180o, Maionia (near Menye, Turkey) mint, c. 138 - 192 A.D.; obverse ∆HMOC, laureate head of Demos right; reverse MAIONWN, cult statue of Artemis standing facing, wearing kalathos and veil, arm supports; this is the first example of this type handled by Forum; scarce; $120.00 (€98.40)
 


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Aezani, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.,| |Aezani,| |Phrygia||AE| |18|
Aizanoi, Latinized as Aezani, was an Ancient Greek city in western Anatolia. Located in what is now Cavdarhisar, Kutahya Province, its ruins are situated astride the River Penkalas, some 1,000 meters above sea level. The city was an important political and economic center in Roman times. Surviving remains from the period include a well-preserved Temple of Zeus, unusual combined thereat-stadium complex, and macellum inscribed with the Price Edict of Diocletian. The city fell into decline in Late Antiquity. Later serving as a citadel, in 2012 the site was submitted for addition to the UNESCO World Heritage List.
RP93134. Bronze AE 18, BMC Phrygia p. 40, 125; Weber 706, SNG Hunterian I 2007, RPC Online IV T1684; SNG Cop 103 var. (obv. leg., crescent and star), aVF, crude style, die wear, minor encrustations, flan crack, weight 3.077 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 225o, Aezani (Cavdarhisar, Turkey) mint, 184 - 192 A.D.; obverse AV KAI KOMO∆OC, laureate head right, no trace of drapery; reverse AIZANEITΩN, cult statue of Artemis of Ephesus standing facing, with arm supports, kalathos on head, no flanking crescent and star; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $115.00 (€94.30)
 


Kyme, Aiolis, 2nd Century B.C.

|Aeolis|, |Kyme,| |Aiolis,| |2nd| |Century| |B.C.||AE| |16|
The types on this coin are unusual. In a recent auction, Nomos AG noted the male figure in the chariot is not only wearing military garb but on some specimens also appears to have a laurel wreath on his head (not visible on this coin). If he is laureate, he could be a Roman emperor, which would date this type to the 1st or early 2nd century A.D. We agree, the long accepted Hellenistic date for this type could be wrong.
GB96107. Bronze AE 16, SNG Cop 113; SNGvA 1644; SNG Munchen 512; BMC Troas p. 113, 96, aVF, slightly rough, die damage reverse center, obverse off center, weight 3.797 g, maximum diameter 16.4 mm, die axis 0o, Kyme (near Nemrut Limani, Turkey) mint, 2nd century B.C.; obverse Artemis standing right, long torch in left hand, quiver and bow on back, clasping right hands with Amazon Kyme, Kyme standing left, transverse scepter in left hand, K-Y flanking the figures; reverse two figures in a slow quadriga right, draped female (Kyme?) in front holding reins, male behind, wearing military dress, holding a long transverse spear; $50.00 (€41.00)
 


Perge, Pamphylia, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Perga|, |Perge,| |Pamphylia,| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.||AE| |18|
Perga was the capital of Pamphylia. Today it is a large site of ancient ruins, 15 kilometers (9.3 mi) east of Antalya on the southwestern Mediterranean coast of Turkey. During the Hellenistic period, Perga was one of the richest and most beautiful cities in the ancient world, famous for its temple of Artemis. It also is notable as the home of the renowned mathematician Apollonius of Perga.Ruins of the main street in Perga
GB97280. Bronze AE 18, SNG BnF 373; SNG Cop 308; BMC Lycia p. 121, 12, gF, nice green patina, weight 3.821 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, Perga (near Antalya, Turkey) mint, 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse simulacrum of Pergaean Artemis within distyle temple, eagle on pediment; reverse quiver with bow tied behind, APTEMI∆OΣ upward on left, ΠEPΓAIAΣ upward on right; $50.00 (€41.00)
 







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