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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Mints| ▸ |Heraclea||View Options:  |  |  | 

Heraclea, Thrace (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey)

Heraclea, the Greek city of Perinthos, later known as Heraclea Thraciae to distinguish it from Heraclea Pontica, is now Marmara Ereglisi in the European part of Turkey. The Roman mint was established by Diocletian shortly before his reform and was in use until the times of Theodosius II. Dates of operation: 291 - 450 A.D. Mintmarks: H, HERAC, HERACL, HT, MHT, SMH, SMHT.

Crispus, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 326 A.D.

|Crispus|, |Crispus,| |Caesar,| |1| |March| |317| |-| |326| |A.D.||reduced| |follis|
On 1 March 317, Constantine the Great and co-emperor Licinius elevated their sons Crispus, Constantine II (still an baby) and Licinius II to Caesars. After this arrangement, Constantine ruled the dioceses Pannonia and Macedonia, and established his residence at Sirmium, from where he prepared a campaign against the Goths and Sarmatians.
RL111902. Billon reduced follis, RIC VII Heraclea 18, Hunter V 71, SRCV IV 16716, Cohen VII 115, Choice aVF, much silvering remaining, well centered, scratches, edge crack, weight 3.091 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 180o, 3rd officina, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 1 Mar - end 317 A.D.; obverse D N FL IVL CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate consular bust left, mappa in right hand, globe and scepter in left; reverse PROVIDENTIAE CAESS (to the foresight of the two princes), campgate with three turrets, no door, MHTΓ in exergue; ex TMC (Tom Maus Coins, Johnson City, NY); $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Maximinus II Daia, May 310 - 30 April 313 A.D.

|Maximinus| |II|, |Maximinus| |II| |Daia,| |May| |310| |-| |30| |April| |313| |A.D.||follis| |(large)|
On 11 November 308, attempting to keep peace within the Roman Empire, at the Congress of Carnuntum, the Tetrarchy declared Maxentius a public enemy, Licinius was proclaimed Augustus, and Constantine I was made Caesar of Britain and Gaul.
RT112564. Billon follis (large), Hunter V 20 (also 2nd officina), RIC VI Heraclea 36, SRCV IV 14721, Cohen VII 40, Choice aVF, full border centering on a broad flan, mild porosity, centers weakly struck, weight 8.352 g, maximum diameter 28.9 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 308 - 309 A.D.; obverse GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, laureate head right; reverse GENIO CAESARIS (to the guardian spirit of the prince), Genius standing slightly left, head left, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, kalathos on head, pouring libations from patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, HTB in exergue; from the Collection of Dr. Jregen Buschek; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

|Constantine| |II|, |Constantine| |II,| |22| |May| |337| |-| |March| |or| |April| |340| |A.D.||centenionalis|
In 327, in an attempt to resolve a labor shortage, Constantine the Great decreed that rural slaves could only be sold in the province where they reside.
RL110758. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Heraclea 96, SRCV V 17241, Cohen VIII 164, Hunter V 79 var. (1st officina), LRBC I 877 var. (pellet right), Choice VF, well centered, blue green patina, light deposits, weight 3.843 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, 5th officina, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, as caesar, 327 - 329 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse PROVIDENTIAE CAESS (to the foresight of the two princes), campgate with two turrets, star above, no door, left, SMHE in exergue; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00


Julian II "the Apostate," February 360 - 26 June 363 A.D.

|Julian| |II|, |Julian| |II| |"the| |Apostate,"| |February| |360| |-| |26| |June| |363| |A.D.||centenionalis|NEW
The celebration for a reign anniversary typically began a year before the actual anniversary and lasted the entire year. The actual celebratory events were likely at the beginning and end of this year-long period. This means that coins celebrating an anniversary were often struck from up to a year before that anniversary. Julian was named Caesar by Constantius II in 355 and used this as the date of the beginning of his reign, not 360 when he was named Emperor by his troops in Gaul, nor 361 when Constantius died and he was acknowledged Emperor throughout the Empire. Thus the celebration of Julian's decannalia, or tenth anniversary of reign, was to begin in 364. In late 362, when Julian needed extra coinage to prepare for his Persian War, what better type to strike than a vota coinage? He really should not have used X for the Soluta, or vows completed, for two more years but it served as great propaganda. He was informing the populace that he will still be around in two years when the war is over.
RL112889. Bronze centenionalis, RIC VIII Heraclea 105, LRBC II 1908, SRCV V 19174, Cohen VIII 151, Hunter V -, VF, well centered, light porosity/corrosion, tiny edge splits/cracks, weight 2.775 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 361 - 363 A.D.; obverse D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust left holding spear and shield; reverse VOT / X / MVLT / XX in four lines within wreath, HERACLA in exergue; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00


Licinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D.

|Licinius| |I|, |Licinius| |I,| |11| |November| |308| |-| |18| |September| |324| |A.D.||follis|NEW
On 3 July 324, at Adrianople, Constantine defeated Licinius forcing him to retreat to Byzantium. Crispus destroyed Licinius' fleet at the Battle of Hellespont in the Dardanelles, allowing his father to cross over the Bosporus and besiege Licinius. On 18 September, Constantine I decisively defeated Licinius at the Battle of Chrysopolis and became sole emperor.
RT112896. Billon follis, Hunter V 118 (also 2nd officina), RIC VII Heraclea 52 (R1), SRCV IV 15222, Cohen VII 74, Choice gVF, earthen deposits, weight 3.437 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 321 - 324 A.D.; obverse IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI (to Jupiter the protector), Jupiter standing slightly left, head left, Victory on globe presenting wreath in right hand, long eagle-topped scepter vertical behind in left, at feet captive right and eagle with wreath in beak left, X/IIΓ right, SMHB in exergue; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00


Licinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D.

|Licinius| |I|, |Licinius| |I,| |11| |November| |308| |-| |18| |September| |324| |A.D.||follis|
On 3 February 313, Constantine the Great and co-emperor Licinius met at a conference in Mediolanum (modern Milan). They issued the Edict of Milan, which established a policy of religious freedom for all, ending the persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire.
RT110134. Billon follis, Hunter V 105 (also 1st officina), RIC VI Heraclea 73, SRCV IV 15240, Cohen VII 108, VF, broad flan, some silvering, flow lines, parts of legends weak, weight 3.505 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, early 313 A.D.; obverse IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG (to Jupiter the protector of the two emperors), Jupiter standing left, nude but for cloak over shoulder, Victory on globe in right hand, long scepter in left hand, eagle left with wreath in beak at feet on left, A right, SMHT in exergue; $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00


Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 May 305 A.D.

|Diocletian|, |Diocletian,| |20| |November| |284| |-| |1| |May| |305| |A.D.||argenteus|
The Sarmatians were a large confederation of Iranian people during classical antiquity, flourishing from about the 5th century B.C. to the 4th century A.D. They spoke Scythian, an Indo-European language from the Eastern Iranian family. The Sarmatians moved to an area called Sarmatia; east of Germania and north of the immediate vicinity of the Danube. These barbarous and little know tribes also occupied the vast tracts of modern Russia. In the autumn of 285, in the Balkans, Diocletian encountered a tribe of Sarmatians who demanded assistance. The Sarmatians requested he either help them recover their lost lands or grant them pasturage rights within the empire. Diocletian refused and fought a battle with them, but was unable to secure a complete victory. The Sarmatians would have to be fought again. In 288, Diocletian managed what was probably another rapid campaign against the resurgent Sarmatians. No details survive, but surviving inscriptions indicate that Diocletian took the title Sarmaticus Maximus after 289.
SH87625. Silver argenteus, RIC VI Heraclea 6 (R3), RSC V 488j, cf. SRCV IV 12612 (Trier, Heraclea noted), Hunter IV -, Choice EF, bold full circles strike, excellent portrait, toned, small dark spots, weight 3.138 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 180o, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 294 A.D.; obverse DIOCLETIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse VICTORIA SARMAT (Victory over the Sarmatians), the four princes sacrificing over tripod before archway in six-turreted fortress enclosure, HA in exergue; very rare (R4); SOLD


Severus II, 25 July 306 - Summer 307 A.D.

|Severus| |II|, |Severus| |II,| |25| |July| |306| |-| |Summer| |307| |A.D.||follis|
In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Army, of the Senate, of the Emperor, etc. The legend GENIO POPVLI ROMANI dedicates this coin to the Genius of the Roman People. Genius' image is of a man with a cloak half covering the shoulders leaving the rest of his body naked, holding a cornucopia in one hand, and a simpulum or a patera in the other.
SH25961. Billon follis, RIC VI Heraclea 30 var. (officina), VF, weight 11.268 g, maximum diameter 28.8 mm, die axis 0o, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, autumn 306 A.D.; obverse IMP C FLA VAL SEVERVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI (to the guardian spirit of the Roman People), Genius standing left, nude but for cloak over shoulder, patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, HTA in exergue; near full silvering; unlisted officina; very rare; SOLD


St. Helena, Augusta, 8 November 324 - c. 330 A.D., Mother of Constantine the Great

|Helena|, |St.| |Helena,| |Augusta,| |8| |November| |324| |-| |c.| |330| |A.D.,| |Mother| |of| |Constantine| |the| |Great||centenionalis|
Constantine appointed his mother Helena as Augusta Imperatrix, and gave her unlimited access to the imperial treasury in order to locate the relics of Judeo-Christian tradition. In 326 - 328 Helena undertook a trip to the Holy Places in Palestine. According to Eusebius of Caesarea she was responsible for the construction or beautification of two churches, the Church of the Nativity, Bethlehem, and the Church on the Mount of Olives, sites of Christ's birth and ascension, respectively.
RL77187. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Heraclea 95 (R5), LRBC I 892, SRCV IV 16616, Cohen VII 12, Hunter V -, Choice EF, excellent centering and strike, green patina, traces of silvering, weight 3.217 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 327 - 329 A.D.; obverse FL HELENA AVGVSTA, diademed and draped bust right; reverse SECVRITAS REIPVBLICE (security of the Republic), Securitas standing half left, veiled head left, branch pointed downward in right hand, raising pallium with left hand, SMHE in exergue; rare; SOLD


Procopius, 28 September 365 - 27 May 366 A.D.

|Procopius|, |Procopius,| |28| |September| |365| |-| |27| |May| |366| |A.D.||centenionalis|
The mint at Heraclea was opened during the reign of Diocletian in 291 and continued to strike coins until it was closed by Leo I, c. 474 A.D.
RL34259. Bronze centenionalis, RIC IX Heraclea 7, LRBC II 1930, Cohen VIII 9, SRCV V 19881, VF, weight 3.453 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 0o, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 28 Sep 365 - Apr 366 A.D.; obverse D N PROCO-PIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust left; reverse REPARATIO FEL TEMP (happy times restored), Procopius standing facing, head right, labarum in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, (Christ monogram) above right, left, SMHB in exergue; rare; SOLD







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