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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Adoptive Emperors||View Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Coins of the Adoptive Emperors
Roman Egypt, Antinoopolites Nome, Portrait of Antinous, c. 30 Oct 130 - 300 A.D.

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Roman| |Egypt,| |Antinoopolites| |Nome,| |Portrait| |of| |Antinous,| |c.| |30| |Oct| |130| |-| |300| |A.D.||tessera|
Antinous probably joined Hadrian's entourage when it passed through Bithynia about 124 A.D. He became Hadrian's constant companion and lover. In October 130 Antinous drowned in the Nile. Hadrian's grief knew no bounds; he enrolled him among the gods, erected a temple, and on 30 October 130, Hadrian founded the city of Antinoopolis on the very bank of the Nile river where Antinous drowned. It was the capital of a new nome, Antinoopolites. Perhaps the date is from the founding of Antinoopolis. There began a Cult of Antinous. Artists vied with each other in immortalizing his beauty. Temples and statues dedicated to him were erected all over the Empire.
AG97755. Glass tessera, Dattari (Savio) (but cf. 6551-6551 for other glass tesserae of different types), green hue, manufacturing flaw at 12h, otherwise intact., weight 1.67 g, maximum diameter 18 mm, Antinopolis Nome mint, c. 30 Oct 130 - 300 A.D.; obverse draped bust of Antinos right, wearing hem-hem crown, crescent before; reverse blank; ex CNG e-sale 481 (25 Nov 2020), lot 280; rare; $500.00 (475.00)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Amisos, Pontos

|Pontos|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Amisos,| |Pontos||drachm|
The Romans conquered Amisus in 71 B.C. during the Third Mithridatic War and Amisus became part of Bithynia et Pontus province. Around 46 B.C., during the reign of Julius Caesar, Amisus became the capital of Roman Pontus. From the period of the Second Triumvirate up to Nero, Pontus was ruled by several client kings, as well as a queen, Pythodorida of Pontus, a granddaughter of Mark Antony. From 62 A.D. it was directly ruled by Roman governors, most famously by Trajan's appointee Pliny the Younger. The estimated population of the city around 150 A.D. was between 20,000 and 25,000, a large city for that time. The city functioned as the commercial capital for the province of Pontus; beating its rival Sinope due to its position at the head of the trans-Anatolia highway.
RS99248. Silver drachm, RPC III 1279 (5 spec.), Recueil Gnral 91, Nordb Amisus 5b, BMC Pontus -, gF, dark spots, part of obv. legend unstruck, tiny edge cracks, weight 2.699 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 210o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, year 167, 135 - 136 A.D.; obverse AYT KAI TPA A∆PI-ANOC CEB Π Π YΠ Γ, laureate head right; reverse AMICOV EΛEVΘEPAC ETOVC PΞZ (Amisos, free city, [year] 167), Hera standing left, wearing diadem, apple in right hand, scepter in left hand; first example of this type handled by Forum, zero sales of this type listed on Coin Archives in the last two decades; very rare; $300.00 (285.00)


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Cius, Bithynia

|Bithynia|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.,| |Cius,| |Bithynia||AE| |26|NEW
Cius was an ancient Greek city bordering the Propontis, now known as the Sea of Marmara, in Bithynia and in Mysia in modern northwestern Turkey, and had a long history, being mentioned by Herodotus, Xenophon, Aristotle, Strabo and Apollonius Rhodius.
RP99435. Bronze AE 26, RPC Online IV.1 11689 (1 specimen, this coin), otherwise unpublished, F, well centered, brown patina, porous/light corrosion, weight 4.386 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 225o, Cius, Bithynia (near Gemlik, Turkey) mint, 180 - 182 A.D.; obverse A K M AV KO ANTΩNI, laureate (and cuirassed?) bust of Commodus right, with short beard; reverse KIANΩN, Hygieia standing half right, head right, feeding snake in right hand, from patera in left hand; from the M. Arslan Collection, extremely rare - this is the only known specimen of the type; $300.00 (285.00)


Plotina, Augusta 105 - 129 A.D., Wife of Trajan, Ankyra in Abbaitis, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Plotina,| |Augusta| |105| |-| |129| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Trajan,| |Ankyra| |in| |Abbaitis,| |Phrygia||AE| |21|NEW
Ankyra, the chief city of the district Abbaitis in western Phrygia, should not be confused with Ankyra in Galatia, the modern capital of Turkey.

The image on the reverse resembles sculptures of Artemis, the Lady of Ephesus, including one at the Ephesus Archaeological Museum and another at the Vatican. The Ionians worshiped Artemis as a mother goddess, akin to the Phrygian Cybele. Her cult image was adorned with multiple rounded breast like protuberances on her chest. They have been variously interpreted as accessory breasts, eggs, grapes, acorns, or even bull testes. Excavation at the site of the Artemision in 1987/8 found a multitude of tear-shaped amber beads that once adorned the ancient wooden xoanon.
Artemis
RP99610. Bronze AE 21, RPC Online III 2536 (6 spec.); BMC Phrygia p. 61, 21; Waddington 5638; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; SNG Munchen -; SNG Tb -; SNG Leypold -, aF, green patina, closed flan crack, reverse scratches, scattered small shallow pitting, off center, weight 5.108 g, maximum diameter 21.4 mm, die axis 0o, Ankyra in Abbaitis (Ankara, Turkey) mint, 112 - Aug 117 A.D.; obverse ΠΛΩTEINA CEBACTH (from upper right), draped bust right, hair in plait behind; reverse ANKYPANΩN EΠI ΛOVKIOY (Ankyra, struck under magistrate Loikios), cult statue of Artemis standing facing, kalathos on head, arms extended with supports, flanked by two stags; very rare; $250.00 (237.50)


Lucius Verus, 7 March 161 - February 169 A.D., Abila, Decapolis, Arabia

|Decapolis,| |Arabia| |&| |Syria|, |Lucius| |Verus,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |February| |169| |A.D.,| |Abila,| |Decapolis,| |Arabia||AE| |25|
Abila in the Decapolis, also known for a time as Seleucia, and ancient Raphana, is now called Quwaylibah, a site occupied by two tells (Tell al-Abila and Tell Umm al-Amad). Tell in Arabic means only "hill." The archaeological connotation of "hill of accumulated debris" in this case does not apply. The city was built over two natural hills on the left bank of Wadi ("valley") Qweilibeh, which is, in fact, delineated by hills and escarpments. The largest site is located amidst verdant agricultural fields near the modern Ain Quweilbeh spring. Roman temples, Byzantine churches and early mosques lie amidst olive groves and wheat fields.
RP98852. Bronze AE 25, RPC IV.3 Online 6514, Spijkerman 11, Rosenberger IV 12, SNG ANS 1122 ff., Sofaer -, VF, well centered, bold strike, green patina, light corrosion, small edge crack, weight 11.659 g, maximum diameter 25.3 mm, die axis 0o, Abila in Decapolis (Quwaylibah, Jordan) mint, 166 - 167 A.D.; obverse AYT KAICAP Λ AYPOYHPOC, laureate and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse CEABIΛHNW-NIAAΓKOICY, nude Herakles seated left on rock, grounded club in right hand, left hand on rocks behind, ΛC ([year] 230) in exergue; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 71 (28 May 2020), lot 686; ex Roma Numismatics e-auction 2 (30 Aug 2018), lot 389; $220.00 (209.00)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Struck at Rome for Use in Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Struck| |at| |Rome| |for| |Use| |in| |Syria||semis|NEW
In 125 A.D., the Pantheon was constructed in Rome as it stands today.
RY99386. Orichalcum semis, RIC II-3 760, McAlee 552(a), BMCRE III 1356, Strack II 626, RPC Online III 3765, SNG Hunterian 2947, gVF, earthen filled fields, slightly off center on a tight flan cutting off part of legends, weight 5.069 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 124 - 125 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate and draped bust right, seen from behind; reverse COS III, Roma seated left on cuirass, right foot drawn back (no helmet), Victory bearing wreath and palm frond in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, round shield behind cuirass, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; $180.00 (171.00)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||denarius|
Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good fortune, and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RS98759. Silver denarius, RIC II-3 221, RSC II 1143, BMCRE III 169, Hunter II 42, Strack II 111, SRCV II -, aVF, edge crack, weight 3.138 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, 119 - c. 120 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust right with bare-chest, drapery on left shoulder; reverse P M TR P COS III (Pontifex Maximus, Tribunitia Potestas, Consul Tertium - high priest, holder of tribunitian power, consul for the 3rd time), Felicitas standing slightly left, head left, caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; ex Numismatic Naumann auction 110 (7 Nov 2021), part of lot 1542; $160.00 (152.00)


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

|Antoninus| |Pius|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.||denarius|NEW
Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good fortune, and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RS99569. Silver denarius, RIC III 299; RSC II 374; BMCRE IV p. 145, 972; Hunter II 124; Strack III 361; SRCV II 4081, VF, light toning, some obverse die damage, small edge cracks, weight 3.389 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 159 - 160 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXIII, laureate head right; reverse FELICITATI AVG COS IIII, Felicitas standing slightly left, head left, celestial globe in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; from the Ed Strivelli Collection, ex FORVM (2016); $160.00 (152.00)


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Kanatha, Decapolis, Provincia Arabia

|Decapolis,| |Arabia| |&| |Syria|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.,| |Kanatha,| |Decapolis,| |Provincia| |Arabia||AE| |17|NEW
Kanatha (or Canatha), 16 miles North of Bostra, is today Qanawat, Syria. It was the Biblical Kenath, which was captured by Nobah from the Amorites (Numbers 32:42 and Judges 8:11) and taken back by Geshur and Aram. The epithet Gabinia (ΓABI in the reverse legend) was probably derived from Gabinius the Proconsul of Syria.
RP99613. Bronze AE 17, SNG ANS 1268; Sofaer p. 154 & pl. 132, 6 ff.; Spijkerman p. 92, 8; Rosenberger IV p. 18, 8, Nice VF, green patina with highlighting earthen deposits, tight flan, reverse a little off center, weight 2.960 g, maximum diameter 16.6 mm, die axis 0o, Kanatha (Qanawat, Syria) mint, Mar/Apr 177 - 31 Dec 192 A.D.; obverse KOMO ANTONC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed right, from behind; reverse ΓABI KANAΘ (A's unbarred, Θ appearing as O), bust of Athena right, draped, wearing crested Corinthian helmet; rare city and coin; $160.00 (152.00)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||denarius|
The Romans believed that Fortuna, after deserting the Persians and Assyrians, took flight over Macedonia and saw Alexander perish as she passed into Egypt and into Syria. At last arriving on Mount Palatine, she threw aside her wings and casting away her wheel, entered Rome where she took up her abode forever. Fortuna was the goddess of fortune and fate, and the personification of luck. She might bring good luck, or bad and distributed good and evil among mankind according to her caprice and without any regard to merit.
RS98771. Silver denarius, RIC II-3 2012.A1+ (S), BMCRE III 641, RSC II 775a, Strack 239, Hunter II 212 var. (draped), SRCV II -, Choice aVF, well centered, flow lines, die wear, small edge cracks, weight 3.478 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 133 - c. 135 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, bare-headed bearded head right; reverse FORTVNA AVG (good fortune of the Emperor), Fortuna standing half left, head left, pater in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; ex Numismatic Naumann auction 110 (7 Nov 2021), part of lot 1542; scarce; $150.00 (142.50)




  







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