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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Adoptive Emperors||View Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Coins of the Adoptive Emperors
Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Ilion (Troy), Troas

|Troas|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.,| |Ilion| |(Troy),| |Troas||AE| |24|
In Greek and Roman mythology, Hector was a Trojan prince and the greatest warrior for Troy in the Trojan War. He acted as leader of the Trojans and their allies in the defense of Troy, killing countless Greek warriors. He was ultimately killed by Achilles.

Did Hector really live? The most valuable historical evidence for the Battle of Troy are treaties and letters mentioned in Hittite cuneiform texts of the same approximate era, which identify an unruly Western Anatolian warlord named Piyama-Radu (possibly Priam) and his successor Alaksandu (possibly Alexander, the nickname of Paris) both based in Wilusa (possibly Ilios), as well as the god Apaliunas (possibly Apollo). The name E-ko-to (along with 20 other names from the myth) is known from Linear B tablets, not referring to the hero, but proving that this name existed in Greek in Mycenaean times.
RP97548. Brass AE 24, cf. Bellinger Troy T192; SNG Mόnchen XIX 254; SNG Cop 405, BMC Troas -, F, rough, parts of legends illegible, central dimple (as usual for the type) on reverse, weight 8.121 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 180o, Ilion (Troy), Troas mint, Mar/Apr 177 - 31 Dec 192 A.D.; obverse AV K M (or Λ?) AY - KOMO∆OC, laureate and draped bust right; reverse E-KTOP, Hector of Troy galloping biga right, head turned back left, wearing helmet and military dress, transverse spear in right hand, shield and reins in left hand, IΛIEΩN in exergue; extremely rare, Coin Archives records only one sale of this type in the past two decades (also listed are a few specimens of the similar and also very rare AE36 and AE19 Hector reverse types struck for Commodus at Ilion); $500.00 (€410.00)


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D., Gaza, Judaea, Syria Palaestina

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Marcus| |Aurelius,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |17| |March| |180| |A.D.,| |Gaza,| |Judaea,| |Syria| |Palaestina||AE| |20|
Throughout the Roman period, Gaza was a prosperous city and received grants and attention from several emperors. A 500-member senate governed Gaza, and a diverse variety of Philistines, Greeks, Romans, Canaanites, Phoenicians, Jews, Egyptians, Persians and Bedouin populated the city. Gaza's mint stamped out coins adorned with the busts of gods, emperors, and empresses. In 66 A.D., Gaza was burned down by Jews during their rebellion against the Romans. However, it remained an important city; even more so after the destruction of Jerusalem by Titus the following year.
RP98106. Bronze AE 20, Sofaer pl. 110, 118 (same rev. die); RPC IV.3 T9072 (2 spec., same obv. die, Marnas below date on plate); Rosenberger II 95; BMC Palestine p. 155, 89, Choice gVF, part of ethnic and date unstruck, attractive enhanced desert patina, weight 6.351 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 0o, Gaza mint, 163 - 164 A.D.; obverse ANTWNEN-OC CEB (starting from the upper right, letters OC CEB on the left all reversed), laureate, draped bust right; reverse ΓAZA (upward on left), ∆KC (year 224, upward on right), Tyche wearing standing facing, looking left, kalathos on head, long grounded scepter vertical in right hand, cornucopia in left, heifer standing left at feet on left, Marnas symbol upper right above date; ex Menashe Landman Collection; rare; $450.00 (€369.00)


Marcus Aurelius & Lucius Verus, 7 March 161 - February 169 A.D., Aelia Capitolina (Jerusalem), Judaea, Syria Palestina

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Marcus| |Aurelius| |&| |Lucius| |Verus,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |February| |169| |A.D.,| |Aelia| |Capitolina| |(Jerusalem),| |Judaea,| |Syria| |Palestina||AE| |23|
During his famous travels, Hadrian visited Judaea and initiated reconstruction of Jerusalem on the Roman model, with a temple of Jupiter replacing the Jewish Temple and restrictions on circumcision. This triggered the Bar-Kochba war, lasting three years and brutal beyond imagination. Hadrian sought to eradicate Judaism and renamed the city Aelia Capitolina. Aelia came from Hadrian's nomen gentile, Aelius, while Capitolina meant that the new city was dedicated to Jupiter Capitolinus, to whom a temple was built on the Temple Mount.
RP98116. Bronze AE 23, RPC Online IV.3 T6416 (9 spec.); Sofaer 55; Meshorer Aelia 56; Rosenberger 35; Kadman Aelia 59; BMC Palestine p. 90, 51; SNG ANS -, nice VF, well centered on a tight flan, attractive near black patina with highlighting red earthen deposits, weight 10.645 g, maximum diameter 22.7 mm, die axis 180o, Aelia Capitolina (Jerusalem) mint, 7 Mar 161 - Feb 169 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES ANTONINO ET VERO AVG, confronted, laureate, draped, and cuirassed busts of M. Aurelius (on left) and L. Verus; reverse COL AEL CAP (Colonia Aelia Capitolina), draped bust of Serapis left, wearing kalathos; rare; $300.00 (€246.00)


Faustina Junior, Augusta, 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Neapolis, Samaria, Syria Palestina

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Faustina| |Junior,| |Augusta,| |146| |-| |Winter| |175/176| |A.D.,| |Neapolis,| |Samaria,| |Syria| |Palestina||AE| |19|
The image on the reverse resembles sculptures of Artemis, the Lady of Ephesus, including one at the Ephesus Archaeological Museum and another at the Vatican. The Ionians worshiped Artemis as a mother goddess, akin to the Phrygian Cybele. Her cult image was adorned with multiple rounded breast like protuberances on her chest. They have been variously interpreted as accessory breasts, eggs, grapes, acorns, or even bull testes. Excavation at the site of the Artemision in 1987/8 found a multitude of tear-shaped amber beads that once adorned the ancient wooden xoanon.Artemis
RP98113. Bronze AE 19, Sofaer 59 (same dies); BMC Palestine p. 56, 69; Rosenberger III 19; RPC IV Online T6349 (8 specs); SNG Cop 17; de Saulcy p. 253, 5; SNG ANS -, nice gF, near black patina with red earthen highlighting, high points flat not fully struck, weight 6.831 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Neapolis (Nablus, Israel) mint, struck under Antoninus Pius, 161 - 162 A.D.; obverse ΦAVCTEINAN CEBACTHN, draped bust right, hair in chingon; reverse ΦΛ NEACΠOΛE CYPIAC ΠAΛ-AI (Flavia Neapolis Syria Palestina, the last two letter in exergue and smaller), cult statue of Artemis Ephesia standing facing, wearing headdress, two stags at feet, hands resting on supports, ET - Ч (year 90) divided across field above arms; ex Menashe Landman Collection; rare; $160.00 (€131.20)


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Tarsos, Cilicia

|Cilicia|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.,| |Tarsos,| |Cilicia||AE| |27|
The title Neokoros, designating a guardian of a temple of the imperial cult, was highly prized and advertised on the coins of many cities. Tarsos was the first city in Cilicia to receive the title, during the reign of Hadrian, not long after 130 A.D. This first temple dedicated to the cult of Hadrian is named in the reverse legend. A second imperial temple was dedicated to Commodus during his reign, before August 191. The B (the Greek number two) indicates this second neokorie. The Kommodeios isolympic worldwide festival was held in honor of this temple. Commodus probably honored Tarsos because its chief god was Hercules, and Commodus had come to believe he was Hercules reincarnated.
RP97264. Bronze AE 27, RPC Online IV.3 T5845, SNG Levante Supp. 260, SNG BnF 1466, SNGvA 5997, Waddington 4636, VF, nice green patina, uneven slightly off-center strike with parts of legends weak or unstruck, weight 11.189 g, maximum diameter 26.8 mm, die axis 30o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, Mar/Apr 177 - 31 Dec 192 A.D.; obverse AYT KAIC AYP KOMO∆OC CEB, mantled bust right, wearing demiurgic crown; club of Hercules behind; reverse A∆P KOM - TAP MHO (Hadrianeia, Kommodeios - Tarsos Metropolis), agonistic crown inscribed KOMO∆EI, OIKO/VME (Kommodeios worldwide) in two lines above, B / NEWKO (two neokorie) in two lines below; ex Zeus Numismatics, auction 11 (01 Aug 2020), lot 453; $145.00 (€118.90)


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D., Caesarea Maritima, Samaria, Syria Palestina

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Marcus| |Aurelius,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |17| |March| |180| |A.D.,| |Caesarea| |Maritima,| |Samaria,| |Syria| |Palestina||AE| |22|
Kadman Caesarea plate V, 53 is from the same dies. No other examples know to FORVM are from the same dies. Kadman listed it as otherwise unpublished, attributed it to Lucius Verus and read the obverse legend as IMP CAES L AVR VERVS AVG ARM. This portrait does favor Lucius Verus. On the Kadman coin the legend clearly starts IMP CAES but the rest is obscure (at least in the photo). On our coin the right side legend is much clearer and certainly ends ONINVS AVG. The combined legible obverse legend is IMP CAES [... ANT]ONINVS AVG, appropriate for Marcus Aurelius.
RP97647. Bronze AE 22, Kadman I plate V, 53 corr. (same dies, see note); RPC Online IV.3 T6318, BMC Palestine, 83 ff.; SNG ANS 778 f.; SNG Righetti 2383; SNG Hunt II 3560, aVF, dark green patina with highlighting earthen deposits, struck on a small flan cutting off part of obverse legend, light marks, weight 12.527 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, die axis 0o, Caesarea Maritima (Keisaria, Israel) mint, 7 Mar 161 - 17 Mar 180 A.D.; obverse [IMP CAES M AVR ANT]ONINVS AVG (or similar), laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse COL PR FL AV-G CAESAREA, draped bust of Serapis right, wearing kalathos; $140.00 (€114.80)


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D., Koinon of Macedonia

|Koinon| |of| |Macedonia|, |Marcus| |Aurelius,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |17| |March| |180| |A.D.,| |Koinon| |of| |Macedonia||AE| |24|
The Macedonian Koinon (community) was the political organization governing the autonomous Roman province of Macedonia and responsible for issuing coinage. Member cities sent representatives to participate in the popular assembly. The Koinon held celebrations and games annually at Beroea (modern Verria) in honor of Alexander the Great and the Roman emperor.
RP98019. Bronze AE 24, RPC Online IV.1 T4277 (10 spec.); AMNG III 272; SNG Cop 1342; Varbanov 3052 (R4); BMC Macedonia p. 28, 156 var. (slight drapery) , VF, dark brown patina, pitting, weight 6.675 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 90o, 7 Mar 161 - 17 Mar 180 A.D.; obverse KAICAP ANTWNINOC, laureate head right; reverse KOINON MAKE∆ONWN, fulmen (thunderbolt) with four wings; $140.00 (€114.80)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Struck in Rome for use in Syria

|Trajan|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.,| |Struck| |in| |Rome| |for| |use| |in| |Syria||chalkous|
In 116 A.D., Trajan made Syria a Roman province. The orichalcum coinage of 116 A.D., which included this coin, was struck in Rome and shipped to Antioch.
RY96780. Bronze chalkous, Woytek 939v (11 spec.), McAlee 526 (rare), RPC III 3681, BMCRE III 1075, Strack 496, gVF, thick earthen deposits, weight 0.748 g, maximum diameter 11.9 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, c. 116 A.D.; obverse laureate and draped bust right; reverse large S•C in wreath; a little gem; rare; $120.00 (€98.40)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Chalcis ad Belum, Chalcidice, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Chalcis| |ad| |Belum,| |Chalcidice,| |Syria||AE| |21|
Trajan's last coinage struck at Chalcis ad Belum used the same reverse, dated KE. Year 25 of the local era must have been Autumn 116 - Autumn 117 A.D.; thus the era of the city began in Autumn 92 A.D. The KE reverse was used for Hadrian's coinage only for the short time after the mint learned he was the new emperor until the local New Year's day (perhaps 29 August). When the New Year began the date was changed to B referring to Hadrian's second regnal year (a new regnal year began on New Year's day, not the one year anniversary of rule).
RP97251. Bronze AE 21, RPC III 3471A (1 spec., added post publication); Butcher CRS p. 437, 15 var. (obv. leg.); SNG Hunterian II 2711 var. (same, slight drapery), VF, near black patina with red earthen highlighting, tight flan, marks, edge a little ragged, weight 9.023 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 0o, Chalcis ad Belum (Qinnasrin, Syria) mint, Autumn 119 - Autumn 120 A.D.; obverse AYT KAIC Θ TPA YI Θ NEP YI - A∆PIANOC CEB, laureate and draped bust right; reverse ΦΛ XAΛ/KI∆EWN / ∆ (Flavius Chalkis [year] 4) in three lines, all within laurel wreath of eight bunches of leaves, closed at the top with a jewel; ex Leu Numismatik web auction 12 (31 May, 2020), part of lot 2018; very rare; $120.00 (€98.40)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||dichalkon|
In 112, one or the greatest Roman historians, Publius Cornelius Tacitus, was Governor of the Roman province of Asia (in Anatolia). The surviving portions of his two major works - the Annals and the Histories - examine the reigns of the Roman Emperors Tiberius, Claudius, Nero and those who reigned in the Year of the Four Emperors.
RX93583. Bronze dichalkon, RPC Online III 4774 (9 spec.); SNG BnF IV 1178, Dattari-Savio 7249, Kampmann 27.525, Emmett 726 (R5), Geissen -, SNG Cop -, Choice VF, nice dark near black patina with earthen highlighting, some porosity, ragged irregular edge, reverse edge beveled, weight 1.701 g, maximum diameter 14.0 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 112 - 28 Aug 113 A.D.; obverse laureate head right; reverse oinochoe (one-handled jug for pouring wine), L - Iς (year 16) flanking in lower fields; scarce; $110.00 (€90.20)




  







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