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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Adoptive Emperors||View Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Coins of the Adoptive Emperors
Roman Egypt, Antinoopolites Nome, Portrait of Antinous, c. 30 Oct 130 - 300 A.D.

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Roman| |Egypt,| |Antinoopolites| |Nome,| |Portrait| |of| |Antinous,| |c.| |30| |Oct| |130| |-| |300| |A.D.||tessera|
Antinous probably joined Hadrian's entourage when it passed through Bithynia about 124 A.D. He became Hadrian's constant companion and lover. In October 130 Antinous drowned in the Nile. Hadrian's grief knew no bounds; he enrolled him among the gods, erected a temple, and on 30 October 130, Hadrian founded the city of Antinoopolis on the very bank of the Nile river where Antinous drowned. It was the capital of a new nome, Antinoopolites. Perhaps the date is from the founding of Antinoopolis. There began a Cult of Antinous. Artists vied with each other in immortalizing his beauty. Temples and statues dedicated to him were erected all over the Empire.
AG97755. Glass tessera, Dattari (Savio) (but cf. 6551-6551 for other glass tesserae of different types), green hue, manufacturing flaw at 12h, otherwise intact., weight 1.67 g, maximum diameter 18 mm, Antinopolis Nome mint, c. 30 Oct 130 - 300 A.D.; obverse draped bust of Antinos right, wearing hem-hem crown, crescent before; reverse blank; ex CNG e-sale 481 (25 Nov 2020), lot 280; rare; $450.00 SALE PRICE $405.00


Faustina Junior, Augusta 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Wife of Marcus Aurelius

|Faustina| |Jr.|, |Faustina| |Junior,| |Augusta| |146| |-| |Winter| |175/176| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Marcus| |Aurelius||denarius|NEW
Faustina Junior and Marcus Aurelius had 14 children. Commodus was the tenth of the fourteen children and the only son to survive. His twin brother Titus Aurelius Fulvus Antonius died at the age of four.
RS110253. Silver denarius, RIC III AP502a, RSC II 54, BMCRE IV AP1086, Hunter II 13, SRCV II 4704, EF, choice obv., rose tone on luster, radiating flow lines, rev. a little off center, mild die wear, weight 2.829 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, struck under Antoninus Pius, 154 - 156 A.D.; obverse FAUSTINA AVG PII AVG FIL, draped bust right with head bare, hair waved and coiled on back of head; reverse CONCORDIA (harmony), Concordia seated left, flower in right hand, left forearm resting on cornucopia atop globe; ex Inasta (San Marino) auction 100 (24 June 2022), lot 238; $300.00 SALE PRICE $270.00


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D.

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.||drachm|NEW
The Nilometer measured the height of the annual Nile flood. Sixteen cubits was considered the ideal height of the annual Nile flood. Less could mean drought or famine. Even in modern times, grand celebrations were held when the flood reached 16 cubits. In years when the flood failed to reach 16 cubits, the celebrations were canceled, and prayers and fasting were held instead. The peak flood occurred at the end of August, which explains why the Egyptian year began on 29 August.
RX110549. Bronze drachm, RPC Online III 4837 (6 spec.), Dattari 992, Kampmann-Ganschow 27.602, Geissen 677 var. (laureate, draped and cuirassed), F, well centered, part of obv. legend weak/unstruck, weight 14.271 g, maximum diameter 32.9 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 114 - 28 Aug 115 A.D.; obverse AYT TPAIAN CEB ΓEPM ∆AKIK (Imperator Traianus Augustus Germanicus Dacicus), laureate half-length nude bust of Trajan right, chest bare, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse Nilus reclining left on hippopotamus, trunk bare, himation around hips and legs and over left arm, reed in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, genius standing by nilometer in background on left on far side of legs, LIH (year 18) in exergue; $180.00 SALE PRICE $162.00


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Ascalon, Philistia, Judaea

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.,| |Ascalon,| |Philistia,| |Judaea||AE| |22|NEW
The Philistines conquered Canaanite Ashkelon about 1150 B.C. and it became one of the five Philistine cities that were constantly warring with the Israelites and the Kingdom of Judah. The last of the Philistine cities to hold out against Nebuchadnezzar, it finally fell in 604 B.C.; burned and destroyed, its people exiled, the Philistine era ended. Ashkelon was rebuilt, dominated by Persian culture. After the Alexander's conquest, Ashkelon was an important Hellenistic seaport. The Jews drove the Greeks out of the region during the Maccabean Revolt, which lasted from 167 to 160 B.C. In 63 B.C. the area was incorporated into the Roman Republic. Cleopatra VII used Ashkelon as her refuge when her brother and sister exiled her in 49 B.C. The city remained loyal to Rome during the First Jewish Revolt.
RY110574. Bronze AE 22, cf. Yashin 200 - 202; RPC IV.3 T10145/2 (2 spec., one with this bust); Rosenberger I 169; BMC Palestine -, Sofaer -, aF, well centered, red-brown patina, weight 11.076 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 0o, Askalon (Ashqelon, Israel) mint, 141 - 142 A.D.; obverse CEBA(?), laureate draped, and cuirassed bust right, short beard; reverse ACKAΛW, Tyche-Astarte standing slightly left on galley, turreted head left, standard in right hand, apluster in left hand, incense altar over E left, dove standing left over EMC (year 245) on right; Coin Archives records only one specimen of the type at auction in the last two decades; extremely rare; $180.00 SALE PRICE $162.00


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||sestertius|
Hadrian traveled to nearly every province of the Empire and spent more than half his reign outside Italy. Nero had been criticized as self-indulgent for his trip to Greece, but Hadrian proudly advertised his travels with his "Adventus" coinage series. Unlike Nero, the pleasure-seeking tourist, Hadrian inspected and corrected the legions and made grants for the construction of new public buildings, projects, and settlements. Hadrian travels were intended to transform conquered lands into a unified Roman Empire.
RB110107. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II-3 1803 (R), BMCRE III 1782, Hunter II 636, Cohen II 1218, SRCV II 3627, aF, well centered, corrosion, weight 24.525 g, maximum diameter 32.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 131 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate and draped bust right, seen from the side; reverse RESTITVTORI ACHAIAE, Hadrian standing left, togate, holding roll in left hand, with right hand raising Achaea, draped, kneeling right and resting left hand on knee; urn containing palm between them, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; from the Shawn Caza Collection, ex Anciennes Collections (Clermont Ferrand, France); rare; $200.00 SALE PRICE $160.00


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||sestertius|
This type of reverse usually indicates the birth of a prince, and we would normally assume the boy and girl on the reverse represent children of the emperor. Hadrian and Sabina, however, had no children.
RB99606. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II-3 988A1, BMCRE III 1370, Hunter II 447, Strack II 629, Cohen II 819, SRCV II 3602 var. (slight drapery), aVF/F, dark near black patina, corrosion, bumps, reverse rough, weight 25.397 g, maximum diameter 33.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 128 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS P P, laureate head right, long neck; reverse HILARITAS P R (Joy of the Roman People), Hilaritas standing half left, head left, palm frond in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, at her feet on left a small nude boy standing right also holding the palm frond, at feet on right a dressed small girl standing left and reaching up touching Hilaritas' drapery, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field, COS III in exergue; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 95 (13 April 2022), lot 1002; ex European collection; $170.00 SALE PRICE $153.00


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Struck at Rome for Use in Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Struck| |at| |Rome| |for| |Use| |in| |Syria||semis|
In 125 A.D., the Pantheon was constructed in Rome as it stands today.
RY99386. Orichalcum semis, RIC II-3 760, McAlee 552(a), BMCRE III 1356, Strack II 626, RPC Online III 3765, SNG Hunterian 2947, gVF, earthen filled fields, slightly off center on a tight flan cutting off part of legends, weight 5.069 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 124 - 125 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate and draped bust right, seen from behind; reverse COS III, Roma seated left on cuirass, right foot drawn back (no helmet), Victory bearing wreath and palm frond in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, round shield behind cuirass, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; $160.00 SALE PRICE $144.00


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Kanatha, Decapolis, Provincia Arabia

|Decapolis,| |Arabia| |&| |Syria|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.,| |Kanatha,| |Decapolis,| |Provincia| |Arabia||AE| |17|
Kanatha (or Canatha), 16 miles North of Bostra, is today Qanawat, Syria. It was the Biblical Kenath, which was captured by Nobah from the Amorites (Numbers 32:42 and Judges 8:11) and taken back by Geshur and Aram. The epithet Gabinia (ΓABI in the reverse legend) was probably derived from Gabinius the Proconsul of Syria.
RP99613. Bronze AE 17, SNG ANS 1268; Sofaer p. 154 & pl. 132, 6 ff.; Spijkerman p. 92, 8; Rosenberger IV p. 18, 8, Nice VF, green patina with highlighting earthen deposits, tight flan, reverse a little off center, weight 2.960 g, maximum diameter 16.6 mm, die axis 0o, Kanatha (Qanawat, Syria) mint, Mar/Apr 177 - 31 Dec 192 A.D.; obverse KOMO ANTONC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed right, from behind; reverse ΓABI KANAΘ (A's unbarred, Θ appearing as O), bust of Athena right, draped, wearing crested Corinthian helmet; rare city and coin; $160.00 SALE PRICE $144.00


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Rhodos, Carian Islands

|Rhodos|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.,| |Rhodos,| |Carian| |Islands||AE| |20|NEW
After surrendering its independence to Rome, Rhodes became a cultural and educational center for Roman noble families and was especially noted for its teachers of rhetoric, such as Hermagoras and the unknown author of Rhetorica ad Herennium. At first, the state was an important ally of Rome and enjoyed numerous privileges, but these were later lost in various machinations of Roman politics. Cassius eventually invaded the island and sacked the city. In the early Imperial period Rhodes became a favorite place for political exiles. Early in the 1st century A.D., the Tiberius spent a brief term of exile on Rhodes. Saint Paul brought Christianity to people on the island. Rhodes reached her zenith in the 3rd century.
RP110269. Bronze AE 20, BMC Caria p. 270, 419; SNG Keckman I 786; SNGvA 2861; SNG Cop 910; SNG Hunt I 1897; SNG Mn 692; SNG Tb 610; Weber 6767; RPC Online IV.2 T925, Choice aVF, broad flan, green patina, red earthen deposits, scratches, weight 4.676 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rhodos (Rhodes, Greece) mint, Aug 138 - 7 Mar 161 A.D.; obverse KAICAP - ANTΩNINOC (clockwise from upper right), laureate head right; reverse PO∆I-ΩN (clockwise from upper right), Radiate head of Helios right; ex Naville Numismatics auction 60 (27 Sept. 2022) , lot 134; ex NAC auction 100 (29 May 2017), lot 1260; $140.00 SALE PRICE $126.00


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Tyana, Cappadocia

|Cappadocia|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Tyana,| |Cappadocia||AE| |19|
Tyana was an ancient city in the Anatolian region of Cappadocia. Under Caracalla the city became Antoniana colonia Tyana. After having sided with Queen Zenobia of Palmyra it was captured by Aurelian in 272, who would not allow his soldiers to sack it, allegedly because Apollo appeared to him, pleading for its safety. The ruins of Tyana are at modern Kemerhisar, three miles south of Nigde. There are remains of a Roman aqueduct and of cave cemeteries and sepulchral grottoes.
RP99126. Bronze AE 19, RPC III 2956 var (date across field), Waddington 6805, cf. Cox Tarsus p. 59, 234 & Pl. XI (year 21), VF, green patina, patina chips, porosity, tight flan, weight 5.028 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Tyana (Kemerhisar, Turkey) mint, 135 - 136 A.D.; obverse AYTO KAIC TPAI A∆PIANOC CEBACTOC, laureate head right; reverse TYANEΩN TΩN ΠP TA IEP ACY AYTO, Athena standing slightly left, head left, Victory bearing wreath and palm frond in right hand, left hand resting on grounded shield, vertical spear resting against shield, ETK (year 20) lower left; $130.00 SALE PRICE $117.00




  







Catalog current as of Wednesday, November 30, 2022.
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