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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Judean & Biblical Coins| ▸ |Biblical Coins| ▸ |Travels of Saint Paul||View Options:  |  |  | 

Travels of Saint Paul

St. Paul's various journeys, occurring from about 35 A.D. to around 67 A.D., took him through a wide array of cities in regions of Syria and Asia Minor. During these journeys his life was affected by major political figures such as Aretas IV, King of the Nabataeans (9 B.C. - 40 A.D.) (2 Cor 11:32); Roman Emperors like Nero (54 - 68 A.D.) (Acts 26:32); the Roman Procurators Antonius Felix (52 - 60 A.D.) (Acts 24:24) and Porcius Festus (59 - 62 A.D) (Acts 24:27) the Herodian rulers Agrippa I (37 - 44 A.D.) and Agrippa II (55 - 95 A.D.) (Acts 25:13); and pagan deities such as Diana (Artemis) of Ephesus (Acts 19:28). See the bottom of this page for a chart of the cities Paul visited. Click on Travels of Paul to see a map and read an article about Paul's journeys.

Knidos, Karia, 2nd Century A.D.

|Other| |Caria|, |Knidos,| |Karia,| |2nd| |Century| |A.D.||AE| |20|
"In Roman times Cnidus seems from its scanty coinage to have lost its former importance. Only a few coins exist, Nero to Caracalla..." -- B. V. Head in Historia Numorum
RP86514. Bronze AE 20, RPC Online IV temp 975 (19 spec.); Nordbø XXIX 1262; SNG Cop 331; BMC Caria p. 97, 97; Lindgren I 639; SNGvA -; SNG Keckman -; SNG Mün -; SNG Tüb -, VF, tight flan cutting off parts of obverse legend, obverse legend weak, bumps and marks, light corrosion, weight 7.174 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 180o, Caria, Cnidus mint, legate Eupoleitas, 2nd century A.D.; obverse T K T EΠI EYΠOΛEITA, bearded male head right; reverse flaming column altar, KNI-∆IΩN divided across field; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; very rare, none on Coin Archives, RPC lists only three examples sold at auction, the last sold in 2006; $225.00 (€184.50)
 


Crusaders, Frankish Greece, Principality of Achaea, Mahaut (Maud) of Hainaut, 1316 - 1318

|Crusaders|, |Crusaders,| |Frankish| |Greece,| |Principality| |of| |Achaea,| |Mahaut| |(Maud)| |of| |Hainaut,| |1316| |-| |1318||denier| |tournois|
This was one of very few medieval coin types minted under female authority. In 1313, Philip I of Taranto, in compensation for breaking their engagement, granted Achaea to Maud and gave her hand to Louis of Burgundy. The principality was, however, possessed by another claimant, Ferdinand of Majorca. At the Battle of Manolada on 5 July 1316, Ferdinand was killed and Louis took control. He was poisoned soon after, leaving 23-year-old Maud in charge. Rule was soon disputed by varying claimants and Maud was dispossessed of her fief by 1318, in which year John, Duke of Durazzo, abducted the princess and forced her to marry him. She did not give him children, however, and he repudiated her in 1321. Maud married again to Hugh de La Palice and retired to Aversa, where she died in 1331.Arms_of_Achaea
CR88475. Billon denier tournois, Malloy Crusaders 42; Metcalf Crusades type MA2, pl. 40, 998, VF, toned, clashed dies, tight flan cutting off parts of legends, weight 0.646 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 0o, Corinth mint, 1316 - 1318; obverse + MAhAVTA·P·Ach', cross pattée within inner border; reverse ⚜DE CLARENCIA (R with a large wedge foot = Corinth), castle tournois surmounted by cross dividing legend, C (Corinth?) left; from the Louis G Estate; $85.00 (€69.70)
 


Crusaders, Frankish Greece, Principality of Achaea, Philip of Savoy, 1301 - 1307

|Crusaders|, |Crusaders,| |Frankish| |Greece,| |Principality| |of| |Achaea,| |Philip| |of| |Savoy,| |1301| |-| |1307||denier| |tournois|
Philip of Savoy was the lord of Piedmont from 1282 until his death and prince of Achaea between 1301 and 1307. He was the son of Thomas III of Piedmont and Guyonne de Châlon. Philip's first marriage was celebrated in Rome on February 12, 1301 to Isabella of Villehardouin, Princess of Achaea. By that marriage, he became Prince of Achaea, though he had already been lord of Piedmont by inheritance from his father in 1282. As prince, Philip ventured to reconquer all of Lacedaemonia from the Greeks. He was, however, an authoritative prince and this put him at odds with the baronage of his realm. He tried to placate the barons of Morea, but was forced to accept a parliament in 1304. The Greek peasantry, crushed by taxes, then revolted in turn. In 1307, King Charles II of Naples, the suzerain of Achaea, confiscated the principality and gave it to his son, Prince Philip I of Taranto. Metcalf indicates all of Philip's coins appear to have been struck at Corinth.Arms_of_Achaea
CR88483. Billon denier tournois, Malloy Crusaders 20, Metcalf Crusades type PS1, VF, toned, clashed dies, uneven strike, slight double strike, weight 0.805 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 90o, Corinth mint, 1301 - 1307; obverse +•Phs•D'SAB•P•AChE•, cross pattée within inner border; reverse (quatrefoil) DE CLARENCIA (quatrefoil), castle tournois surmounted by cross dividing legend, surmounted by cross, five pointed star below castle; from the Louis G Estate; $85.00 (€69.70)
 


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Elagabalus,| |16| |May| |218| |-| |11| |March| |222| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||as|
Richard McAlee notes that ∆ E probably abbreviates ∆ EΠAPXEIΩN, meaning "of the four eparchies. McAlee also list weights for the type ranging from 3.8 - 6.16 grams and a diameter as small as 17mm. This coin is considerably heavier and larger than most examples.
RY93579. Bronze as, McAlee 799; BMC Galatia p. 205, 447; SNG Righetti 2010; Waage 600; SNG Cop -, VF, nice highlighting desert patina, broad heavy flan for the type, weight 11.221 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 16 May 218 - 11 Mar 222 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR ANTONINVS AVG, laureate head right, bare right shoulder seen from behind, slight drapery over left shoulder; reverse ∆ E, star below, all within laurel wreath with ten bunches of leaves and fastened at the top with a garland; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 47 (28 Jun 2018), lot 507; scarcer heavy specimen; $80.00 (€65.60)
 


Tarsos, Cilicia, c. 164 - 27 B.C.

|Cilicia|, |Tarsos,| |Cilicia,| |c.| |164| |-| |27| |B.C.||AE| |21|
Sandan was a Hittite-Babylonian sun, storm, or warrior god, also perhaps associated with agriculture. The Greeks equated Sandan with Herakles (Hercules). At Tarsus an annual festival honored Sandan-Herakles, which climaxed when an image of the god was burned on a funeral pyre.
GB93605. Bronze AE 21, SNG Levante 940; SNG BnF 1321 - 22; SNG Cop 333 var. ff. (different controls); BMC Lycaonia p. 180, 95 var. ff. (same), VF, dark patina with highlighting red earthen deposits, bumps, porosity, weight 6.871 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 0o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, c. 164 - 27 B.C.; obverse veiled and turreted head of Tyche right; reverse Sandan cult image standing right on horned and winged animal, on a garlanded base and within a pyramidal pyre surmounted by an eagle, two monograms over filleted club on left, TAPΣEΩN downward on right; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $70.00 (€57.40)
 


Licinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D.

|Licinius| |I|, |Licinius| |I,| |11| |November| |308| |-| |18| |September| |324| |A.D.||follis|
Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and god of the sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is, therefore, the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. Emperors frequently made vows to Jupiter for protection. The Roman's believed as the king of the gods, Jupiter favored emperors and kings, those in positions of authority similar to his own.
RT97952. Billon follis, Hunter V 87 (also 3rd officina), RIC VI Thessalonica 60, SRCV V 15251, gVF, great detail, areas of weak strike, porous, flan crack, weight 3.857 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 210o, 3rd officina, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, 312 - 313 A.D.; obverse IMP LIC LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG NN (to Jove the protector of our two Emperors), Jupiter standing left, nude but for cloak over shoulder, Victory on globe in right hand, long scepter in left hand, eagle left with wreath in beak at feet on left, •TS•Γ• in exergue; $70.00 (€57.40)
 


Licinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D.

|Licinius| |I|, |Licinius| |I,| |11| |November| |308| |-| |18| |September| |324| |A.D.||follis|
At the beginning of the 16th century nearly 20,000 Sephardic Jews immigrated to Greece from Spain following their expulsion. By 1519, 15,715 Jews lived in Thessaloniki, 54% of the population. After the Great Thessaloniki Fire of 1917 left 72,000 people homeless, unable to stay and survive, nearly half of the Jewish population emigrated to France, the United States and Palestine. On April 22, 1941, Thessaloniki fell to Nazi Germany. 50,000 Jews, 95% of the Jewish population, were sent to concentration camps where most were murdered in the gas chambers. Another 11,000 Jews were sent to forced labor camps, where most also perished. Only 1200 Jews live in the city today.
RT97956. Billon follis, Hunter V 85 (also 1st officina), RIC VI Thessalonica 60, SRCV V 15251, VF, full legend centering, traces of silvering, porosity, centers weakly struck, weight 3.528 g, maximum diameter 24.7 mm, die axis 150o, 1st officina, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, 312 - 313 A.D.; obverse IMP LIC LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG NN (to Jove the protector of our two Emperors), Jupiter standing half left, Victory on globe in right hand, long scepter in left hand, eagle with wreath in beak left, •TS•A• in exergue; $50.00 (€41.00)
 


Licinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D.

|Licinius| |I|, |Licinius| |I,| |11| |November| |308| |-| |18| |September| |324| |A.D.||follis| |(large)|
In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Army, of the Senate, of the Roman People, etc. The legend GENIO AVGVSTI dedicates this coin to the Genius of the emperors, the Augusti. Genius' image is of a man with a cloak half covering the shoulders leaving the rest of his body naked, holding a cornucopia in one hand, and a simpulum or a patera in the other.
RT97947. Billon follis (large), Hunter V 81 (also 3rd officina), RIC VI Thessalonica 30b, SRCV IV 15150, Cohen VII 27, VF, well centered, porosity, weight 7.978 g, maximum diameter 25.3 mm, die axis 180o, 3rd officina, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, 308 - 310 A.D.; obverse VAL•LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse GENIO AVGVSTI (to the guardian spirit of the Emperor), Genius standing slightly left, head left, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, kalathos on head, pouring libations from patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, star left, Γ right,•SM•TS• in exergue; $45.00 (€36.90)
 







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Road to Damascus

1st Missionary Journey

2nd Missionary Journey

3rd Missionary Journey

Journey to Rome

 Jerusalem
 Damascus
 Nabataean Kingdom
 Damascus
 Jerusalem
 Lydda
 Joppa
 Caesarea
 Tarsus
 Antioch (Syria)

 

 

 

 

 

 Antioch (Syria)
 Seleucia Pieria
 Salamis
 Paphos
 Perge
 Antioch (Pisidia)
 Iconium
 Lystra
 Derbe
 Attalia
 Antioch (Syria)

 Jerusalem
 Antioch (Syria)
 Trasus
 Derbe
 Lystra
 Iconium
 Antioch (Pisidia)
 Dorylaeum
 Alexandria Troas
 Neapolis
 Philippi
 Amphipolis
 Apollonia
 Thessalonica
 Beroea
 Athens
 Corinth
 Cenchreae
 Ephesus
 Caesarea
 Jerusalem
 Antioch (Syria)

 Antioch (Syria)
 Tarsus
 Derbe
 Lystra
 Iconium
 Antioch (Pisidia)
 Ephesus
 Alexandria Troas
 Philippi
 Thessalonica
 Corinth
 Philippi
 Assos
 Miletos
 Patara
 Tyre
 Ptolemais
 Caesarea
 Joppa
 Jerusalem

 Jerusalem
 Caesarea
 Sidon
 Myra
 Malta
 Syracuse
 Rhegium
 Puteoli
 Rome


Italics means there is no evidence that coins were minted in that city.


Catalog current as of Friday, October 22, 2021.
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