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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Adoptive Emperors| ▸ |Hadrian||View Options:  |  |  |   

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

Hadrian, one of the "Five Good Emperors," abandoned the expansionist policy of Trajan and established a policy of defense and consolidation during which Hadrian's Wall in Britain was constructed. He traveled to nearly every province of the Empire, more than any other emperor, often ordering grandiose building programs to improve infrastructure and the quality of life in those regions. An ardent admirer of Greece, he sought to make Athens the cultural capital of the Empire and ordered the construction of many opulent temples in the city. He spent much of his time with the military; usually wore military attire and even dined and slept amongst the soldiers. He ordered military training and drilling to be more rigorous and made use of false reports of attack to keep the army alert. He suppressed the Bar Kokhba revolt in Judaea, renaming the province Syria Palaestina.Roman Empire 125 AD

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||tetradrachm|
Demeter in Greek mythology is the goddess of grain and fertility, the pure; nourisher of the youth and the green earth, the health-giving cycle of life and death; and preserver of marriage and the sacred law. In the Homeric Hymn to Demeter, dated to about the seventh century B.C. she is invoked as the "bringer of seasons," a subtle sign that she was worshiped long before she was made one of the Olympians. She and her daughter Persephone were the central figures of the Eleusinian Mysteries that also predated the Olympian pantheon.
RX94280. Billon tetradrachm, RPC III 6131; Dattari-Savio 7401; Milne 1519; SNG Cop 409; Geissen 1209; BMC Alexandria p. 71, 579; Kampmann 32.720; Emmett 830/21 (R1), Choice VF, well centered, light tone, flow lines, edge cracks, weight 13.792 g, maximum diameter 26.8 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 136 - 28 Aug 137 A.D.; obverse AVT KAIC TPA - A∆PIANOC CEB (Imperator Caesar Traianus Hadrianus Augustus), laureate head right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse Demeter standing slightly left, head left, wreathed with grain, wearing chiton with diplos, veil on shoulders blowing behind, stalks of grain and poppy in right hand, long torch vertical behind in left hand, L / K-A (year 21) across field; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 83 (3 Nov 2019), lot 544; $350.00 (353.50)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Ascalon, Philistia, Judaea

|Judaea| |&| |Palestine|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Ascalon,| |Philistia,| |Judaea||AE| |19|
Askalon lies on the shore of the Mediterranean, ten miles north of Gaza and about 40 miles south of Joppa. Herod the Great ruled all of Palestine, except Askalon, which remained a free city. Today, a national park at Ashqelon, Israel includes ruins of Canaanite, Greek, Roman, Byzantine and Crusader walls and buildings.
JD111088. Bronze AE 19, RPC Online III 4002 (9 spec.); Sofaer 123; SNG ANS 714; De Saulcy 3; Rosenberger 151; Yashin 176; BMC Palestine -, F, toned, porous, a little off center, weight 6.283 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Askalon (Ashqelon, Israel) mint, 118 - 119 A.D.; obverse CEBACTOC (clockwise on right), laureate head right; reverse ACKA-ΛΩ, war-god Phanebal standing left, wearing helmet, harpa in raised right hand, small round shield on left arm, long palm frond in left hand, BKC (year 222) lower right; zero sales of this type listed on Coin Archives in the last two decades; rare; $180.00 (181.80)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Struck at Rome for Use in Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Struck| |at| |Rome| |for| |Use| |in| |Syria||semis|
In 125 A.D., the Pantheon was constructed in Rome as it stands today.
RY99386. Orichalcum semis, RIC II-3 760, McAlee 552(a), BMCRE III 1356, Strack II 626, RPC Online III 3765, SNG Hunterian 2947, gVF, earthen filled fields, slightly off center on a tight flan cutting off part of legends, weight 5.069 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 124 - 125 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate and draped bust right, seen from behind; reverse COS III, Roma seated left on cuirass, right foot drawn back (no helmet), Victory bearing wreath and palm frond in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, round shield behind cuirass, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; $145.00 (146.45)


|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||dupondius|NEW
Hadrian abandoned Trajan's expansionist policy and established a policy of defense and consolidation. Hadrian's Wall in Britain was part of this defense. He traveled more than any other emperor. His grandiose building programs improved the infrastructure and quality of life.
RB110693. Orichalcum dupondius, RIC II-3 614, BMC III 1225, Hunter II 343, Strack II 540, Cohen II 784 var. (TRAIANVS), SRCV II -, aVF/F, green-brown patina, porosity, marks, weight 12.321 g, maximum diameter 26.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 121 - 123 B.C.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG P M TR P COS III, radiate head right; reverse FORTVNAE REDVCI, Fortuna seated left, rudder in right hand held by tiller, cornucopia in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) in exergue; $130.00 (131.30)


|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||dupondius|
Salus is the goddess of health but also of the public welfare (Salus publica or Romana). She was often represented on coins and art, like Fortuna, with a rudder and a globe at her feet, indicating her responsibility for steering the state for the good of the people.
RB110005. Orichalcum dupondius, RIC II 604a, BMCRE III 1237, Cohen II 1358, SRCV II 3668, F, nice green patina, light marks, slightly off center, weight 9.994 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 119 - 121 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIANVS HADRIANVS AVG P M TR P COS III, Radiate bust right, bare chest, drapery on left shoulder; reverse SALVS PVBLICA (health of the public), Salus standing left, right foot on globe, patera in right hand, rudder with blade upward in left hand; $120.00 (121.20)


Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria, 128 - 129 A.D.

|Antioch|, |Antioch,| |Seleukis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria,| |128| |-| |129| |A.D.||trichalkon|
Michael Molnar, an astronomer, believes this coin depicts Jupiter's occultation of Aries in 6 B.C., the most probable "Star of Bethlehem." We think it is unlikely; nevertheless, the type is very popular and somewhat expensive.
GB90244. Bronze trichalkon, RPC Online III 3729, Butcher CRS 266, McAlee 125(d), SNG Hunterian II 2950, F, dark near black patina, highlighting red earthen deposits, weight 5.145 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, reign of Hadrian, 128 - 129 A.D.; obverse ANTIOXEΩN THC MHTPOΠOΛEWC, veiled and turreted head of Tyche right, weak countermark at chin; reverse ram leaping right, looking back, star within crescent above, ET ZOP (year 177 of the Caesarean Era) below; $100.00 (101.00)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Perga, Pamphylia

|Perga|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Perga,| |Pamphylia||AE| |15|
Perga was the capital of Pamphylia. Today it is a large site of ancient ruins, 15 kilometers (9.3 mi) east of Antalya on the southwestern Mediterranean coast of Turkey. During the Hellenistic period, Perga was one of the richest and most beautiful cities in the ancient world, famous for its temple of Artemis. It also is notable as the home of the renowned mathematician Apollonius of Perga.Street in Perga
RP110437. Bronze AE 15, RPC Online III 2699 (5 spec.), SNG BnF 403, SNGvA 4671, SNG Cop -, BMC Lycia -, Lindgren-Kovacs -, VF, centered, attractive portrait, nice green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, scratches, weight 2.653 g, maximum diameter 15.2 mm, die axis 180o, Perga (near Antalya, Turkey) mint, 11 Aug 117 - 10 Jul 138 A.D.; obverse KAICAP A∆PIANOC, laureate bust right, drapery on far shoulder; reverse ΠEPΓ APTEMI, cult statue of Artemis of Perge in temple with two columns, eagle in pediment; $100.00 (101.00)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Petra, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Petra,| |Arabia||AE| |22|NEW
At the end of the narrow gorge, the Siq, stands Petra's most elaborate ruin, popularly known as Al-Khazneh ("the Treasury"), hewn into the sandstone cliff. While remaining in remarkably preserved condition, the face of the structure is marked by hundreds of bullet holes made by the local Bedouin tribes that hoped to dislodge riches that were once rumored to be hidden within it. A little farther from the Treasury, at the foot of the mountain called en-Nejr, is a massive theater, positioned so as to bring the greatest number of tombs within view. At the point where the valley opens out into the plain, the site of the city is revealed with striking effect. The theater was cut into the hillside and into several of the tombs during its construction. Rectangular gaps in the seating are still visible. Almost enclosing it on three sides are rose-colored mountain walls, divided into groups by deep fissures and lined with knobs cut from the rock in the form of towers.Theater
RP110776. Bronze AE 22, RPC Online III 4105 (13 spec.); SNG ANS 6 1366; SNG Righetti 2544; Spijkerman 8; BMC Arabia p. 35, 9; Rosenberger I 7, Choice F, well centered, near black patina, highlighting reddish earthen fill, remnants of flan casting sprues, weight 6.925 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 180o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 117 - 138 A.D.; obverse AVTOKPATΩP KAICAP TPAIANOC A∆PIANOC CEBACTOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse A∆PIANH ΠETPA MHTPOΠOΛIC, turreted, veiled, and draped bust of Tyche right; $100.00 (101.00)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Samosata, Commagene, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Samosata,| |Commagene,| |Syria||AE| |21|
Samosata, meaning "sun," was an ancient city whose ruins existed at the modern city of Samsat, Adiyaman Province, Turkey until the site was flooded by the Atatrk Dam. -- wikipedia.org
RP99004. Bronze AE 21, RPC III 3419; SNG Hunt 2590; SNG Munchen 376; SNG Cop Cyprus 17; Butcher p. 470, 12; BMC Galatia p. 118, 22, gVF, dark patina, uneven strike with flat areas, part of edge ragged, light earthen deposits, weight 5.450 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 180o, Samosata (site now flooded by the Atatrk Dam) mint, c. 132 - 133 A.D.; obverse A∆PIANOC CEBACTOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear; reverse ΦΛA / CAMO / MHTPO / KOM (Flavia Samosata Metropolis Commagene), inscription in four lines within oak wreath; $90.00 (90.90)


|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||sestertius|
Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good fortune, and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RB110108. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II-3 2255, BMCRE III 1497, Cohen II 620, SRCV II 3595, Strack II 663, Hunter II 517 var. (slight drapery), aF, porosity/light corrosion, weight 24.130 g, maximum diameter 33.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 134 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse FELICITAS AVG (the good fortune of the Emperor), Felicitas standing slightly left, head left, olive branch in right hand, long caduceus in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across the field; from the Shawn Caza Collection, ex Anciennes Collections (Clermont Ferrand, France); $90.00 (90.90)




  



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OBVERSE LEGENDS

AVGVSTVSHADRIANVS
AVGVSTVSHADRIANVSPP
DIVVSHADRIANVSAVG
HADRIANVSAVGCOSIIIPP
HADRIANVSAVGVST
HADRIANVSAVGVSTVS
HADRIANVSAVGVSTVSPP
IMPCAEDITRAIANFDIVNERNEPTRAHADRIANOAVG
IMPCAEDIRAPARFDIVINERNEPTRAHADRIANOAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIAHADRIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIANHADRIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIANVSHADRIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIANVSHADRIANVSAVGPMTRPCOSIII
IMPCAESHADRIANDIVINERTRAIANOPTFIL
IMPCAESTRAHADRIANOAVGPP
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOAVGDIVITRA
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOAVGDIVITRAPARTHF
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOPTAVGGERDAC
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOOPTAVGGERDAC


REFERENCES

Abdy, R. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. II - Part 3, From AD 117 - 138, Hadrian. (London, 2019).
Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Blum, G. "Numismatique D'Antinoos" in JIAN 16. (Athens, 1914). pp. 33 - 70.
Calic, E. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 2: Nerva to Antoninus Pius. (Paris, 1883).
Delegido Moran, C. Aprovisionamiento, circulacin y uso de la moneda de plata en Hispania (siglos I-III d.C.): El Tesoro de Llria. (Valencia, 2014).
Hill, P. The Dating and Arrangement of the Undated Coins of Rome, A.D. 98-148. (London, 1970).
Mattingly H. & E. Sydenham. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. II: Vespasian to Hadrian. (London, 1926).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 3: Nerva to Hadrian. (London, 1936).
McAlee, R. The Coins of Roman Antioch. (Lancaster, PA, 2007).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet. II. Trajan to Commodus (London, 1971).
Seaby, H. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Strack, P. Untersuchungen zur rmischen Reichsprgung des zweiten Jahrhunderts, Teil II: Die Reichsprägung zur Zeit des Hadrian. (Stuttgart, 1933).
Toynbee, J. Roman medallions. ANSNS 5. (New York, 1944).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

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