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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Adoptive Emperors| ▸ |Hadrian||View Options:  |  |  |   

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

Hadrian, one of the "Five Good Emperors," abandoned the expansionist policy of Trajan and established a policy of defense and consolidation during which Hadrian's Wall in Britain was constructed. He traveled to nearly every province of the Empire, more than any other emperor, often ordering grandiose building programs to improve infrastructure and the quality of life in those regions. An ardent admirer of Greece, he sought to make Athens the cultural capital of the Empire and ordered the construction of many opulent temples in the city. He spent much of his time with the military; usually wore military attire and even dined and slept amongst the soldiers. He ordered military training and drilling to be more rigorous and made use of false reports of attack to keep the army alert. He suppressed the Bar Kokhba revolt in Judaea, renaming the province Syria Palaestina.Roman Empire 125 AD

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||sestertius|
This type of reverse usually indicates the birth of a prince, and we would normally assume the boy and girl on the reverse represent children of the emperor. Hadrian and Sabina, however, had no children.
RB97380. Orichalcum sestertius, BMCRE III 1372 (also with slight drapery), RIC II-3 988, Strack 629a, Banti 442, Cohen II 819, Hunter II 447, SRCV II 3602, VF, well centered, Tiber patina, light corrosion, weight 22.258 g, maximum diameter 33.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 128 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS P P, laureate head right, long neck, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse HILARITAS P R (Joy of the Roman People), Hilaritas standing half left, head left, palm frond in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, at her feet on left a small nude boy standing right also holding the palm frond, at feet on right a dressed small girl standing left and reaching up touching Hilaritas' drapery, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field, COS III in exergue; ex Ammon Shahar Collection; $220.00 SALE |PRICE| $198.00
 


|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||sestertius|
Hadrian was born in Hispania. The origin of the name Hispania is much disputed and the evidence for the various speculations is very weak. Two theories hold it to be of Punic derivation, from the Phoenician language of colonizing Carthage. In Hebrew, "i-shfania" means "island of the rabbit." Punic-Phoenician and Hebrew are both Canaanite languages and therefore closely related to each other. The name Hispania may be derived from an ancient Punic name identifying the place as a land of rabbits. Another theory holds the name is derived the word from the Phoenician word "span," meaning hidden, indicating a hidden, that is, a remote, or far-distant land. Although missing on this specimen, the rabbit in this series has been used as evidence to support the first theory.
RB97212. Orichalcum sestertius, BMCRE III 1748 (no rabbit), RIC II-3 1664 (S), Cohen II 832 (no rabbit), Cohen II 840 (rabbit right), Hunter II -, SRCV II -, aF, dark brown patina, edge crack, light scratches and deposits, tooling on reverse legend, weight 23.335 g, maximum diameter 31.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 134 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate and draped bust right; reverse HISPANIA, Hispania reclining left, olive branch in extended right hand, left arm on rocks, rabbit (if any, worn) right on near side of rocks, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; scarce; $140.00 SALE |PRICE| $126.00
 


|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||denarius|
Clementia was the goddess of forgiveness and mercy, which the Romans considered good traits for a caesar or emperor. In 44 B.C., a temple was consecrated to her by the Roman Senate, possibly at Julius Caesar's instigation. She was deified as a celebrated virtue of Julius Caesar, who was famed for his forbearance, especially following his civil war with Pompey from 49 B.C.
RS97482. Silver denarius, RIC II-3 1066, Strack II 333, BMCRE III 536 note, RSC II 218 var. (bare head), SRCV II 3464 var. (same), Choice aVF, lightly toned, excellent centering, nice portrait, radiating flow lines, reverse die wear, small edge split, weight 3.172 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 132 - 134 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, bare head right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse CLEMENTIA AVG COS III P P, Clementia standing facing, head left, patera in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand; scarce variety; $140.00 SALE |PRICE| $126.00 ON RESERVE


|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||denarius|
In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Army, of the Senate, of the Roman People, etc. The figure depicted is the statue of the Spirit of the Roman People which was then in the Roman Forum (it is now lost). The act of pouring the libation to the emperor illustrates what the Christians were required to do in order not to be persecuted.
RS94593. Silver denarius, RIC II-3 724, RIC II 173(c), RSC II 335b, BMCRE III 400, Hunter II 128, Strack II 168, SRCV II 3476 var. (slight drapery), Choice F, toning, centered on a wide flan, flow lines, porosity, edge ragged with small splits, weight 2.712 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 124 - 125 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse COS III, Genius standing left, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs and draped over left arm, sacrificing from patera in right over flaming garlanded altar, cornucopia in left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $120.00 SALE |PRICE| $108.00
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Chalcis ad Belum, Chalcidice, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Chalcis| |ad| |Belum,| |Chalcidice,| |Syria||AE| |21|NEW
Trajan's last coinage struck at Chalcis ad Belum used the same reverse, dated KE. Year 25 of the local era must have been Autumn 116 - Autumn 117 A.D.; thus the era of the city began in Autumn 92 A.D. The KE reverse was used for Hadrian's coinage only for the short time after the mint learned he was the new emperor until the local New Year's day (perhaps 29 August). When the New Year began the date was changed to B referring to Hadrian's second regnal year (a new regnal year began on New Year's day, not the one year anniversary of rule).
RP97251. Bronze AE 21, RPC III 3471A (1 spec., added post publication); Butcher CRS p. 437, 15 var. (obv. leg.); SNG Hunterian II 2711 var. (same, slight drapery), VF, near black patina with red earthen highlighting, tight flan, marks, edge a little ragged, weight 9.023 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 0o, Chalcis ad Belum (Qinnasrin, Syria) mint, Autumn 119 - Autumn 120 A.D.; obverse AYT KAIC Θ TPA YI Θ NEP YI - A∆PIANOC CEB, laureate and draped bust right; reverse ΦΛ XAΛ/KI∆EWN / ∆ (Flavius Chalkis [year] 4) in three lines, all within laurel wreath of eight bunches of leaves, closed at the top with a jewel; ex Leu Numismatik web auction 12 (31 May, 2020), part of lot 2018; very rare; $120.00 SALE |PRICE| $108.00
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Samosata, Commagene, Syria

|Samosata|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Samosata,| |Commagene,| |Syria||AE| |19|NEW
Samosata, meaning "sun," was an ancient city whose ruins existed at the modern city of Samsat, Adiyaman Province, Turkey until the site was flooded by the Atatürk Dam. -- wikipedia.org
RY94959. Bronze AE 19, cf. RPC III 3419; SNG Munchen XXVIII 373 ff.; BMC Galatia p. 118, 20 ff., VF, attractive portrait, nice dark green patina with highlighting earthen deposits, tight flan cutting off right side of obv. legend, reverse off center, weight 4.345 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 0o, Samosata (site now flooded by the Atatürk Dam) mint, 11 Aug 117 - 10 Jul 138 A.D.; obverse A∆PIANOC CEBACTOC (or similar with date at end of legend), laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear; reverse ΦΛA / CAMO / MHTPO / KOM (Flavia Samosata Metropolis Commagene), inscription in four lines within oak wreath, pellet in annulet at top; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Struck at Rome for Use in Syria

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Struck| |at| |Rome| |for| |Use| |in| |Syria||semis|
The kithara (cithara) was an ancient stringed musical instrument resembling the lyre. The lyre was a simpler folk-instrument with two strings and tortoise shell body. The kithara had seven strings and a flat back. The kithara is a symbol of Apollo and he is credited with inventing it. Its true origins were likely Asiatic.. The kithara was primarily used by professional musicians, called kitharodes. In modern Greek, the word kithara has come to mean "guitar."
RB97211. Orichalcum semis, McAlee 547(a), RIC II 688 (S), SRCV II 3701, Cohen II 443, BMCRE III -, aVF, dark green patina, tight flan, light marks, light earthen deposits, weight 3.968 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 119 - 10 Jul 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse COS III, kithara (lyre), S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across the field; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00 ON RESERVE


|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||dupondius|
Annona was worshiped in Rome as the goddess who prospered the year's supply of grain. She was represented on an altar in the capital. The three principal granaries of Rome were Sicily, Egypt, and the African provinces. Annona civilis was the grain which purchased each year by the Roman state, then imported and put into storage, reserved and distributed for the subsistence of the people. Annona militaris was grain appropriated to the use of an army during a campaign.
RB95900. Orichalcum dupondius, RIC II-3 742; BMCRE III 1334A; Strack II 588; cf. SRCV II 3675 (similar but Annona right); Cohen II 176 (perhaps this coin); Hunter II -, aVF, well centered, rough corrosion, weight 10.531 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 124 - 127 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, radiate bust right, chest bare, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse COS III, Annona seated left, attendant stands before her helping to draw out a a cloth full of bread loaves(?), stern of ship in the background on right, S - C (Senatus Consulto) across field, ANNONA AVG in exergue; from the Michael Arslan Collection; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||obol|
In 127 A.D., Hadrian, acting on the advice of his proconsul of Asia, Gaius Minicius Fundanus, determined that Christians shall not be put to death without a trial.
RX92542. Bronze obol, RPC Online III 5681; Geissen 961; Dattari 1915; Milne 1236; BMC Alexandria p. 104, 894; SNG Cop 337; Kampmann 32.436; Emmett 1149/11 (R1), aVF, partial green patina, obverse edge beveled, porous, many tiny edge splits, weight 5.184 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 126 - 28 Aug 127 A.D.; obverse AYT KAI TPAI A∆PIA CEB, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse two cornucopias, upright tops curving outward, overflowing with fruits, LIA (year 11) between; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $60.00 SALE |PRICE| $54.00
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Bostra, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Bostra,| |Arabia||AE| |20|NEW
Bostra was the northern Nabataean capital, until Trajan annexed the kingdom. It was then capital of Provincia Arabia, where the Third Legio Cyrenaica was garrisoned. The emperor Philip was born in Bostra and designated it a metropolis.
RY94938. Bronze AE 20, Spijkerman 2 (same dies); RPC Online III 4083 (21 spec.); Kindler Bostra 16; Sofaer 3; BMC Arabia p. 14, 3 - 6; SNG ANS 1168; SNG Cop -, F, irregular flan, orange earthen highlights, weight 6.129 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 180o, Bostra (Bosra, Syria) mint, 11 Aug 117 - 10 Jul 138 A.D.; obverse AYTOKPAT KAICAP TPAIANOC A∆PIANOC CEBACTOC, laureate bust right, drapery on left shoulder; reverse bust of Arabia right, wearing turreted crown and mantle blown out behind, small figure of a seated child held in each arm, APABIA below; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $60.00 SALE |PRICE| $54.00
 




  



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|OBVERSE |LEGENDS

AVGVSTVSHADRIANVS
AVGVSTVSHADRIANVSPP
DIVVSHADRIANVSAVG
HADRIANVSAVGCOSIIIPP
HADRIANVSAVGVST
HADRIANVSAVGVSTVS
HADRIANVSAVGVSTVSPP
IMPCAEDITRAIANFDIVNERNEPTRAHADRIANOAVG
IMPCAEDIRAPARFDIVINERNEPTRAHADRIANOAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIAHADRIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIANHADRIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIANVSHADRIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIANVSHADRIANVSAVGPMTRPCOSIII
IMPCAESHADRIANDIVINERTRAIANOPTFIL
IMPCAESTRAHADRIANOAVGPP
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOAVGDIVITRA
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOAVGDIVITRAPARTHF
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOPTAVGGERDAC
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOOPTAVGGERDAC


REFERENCES|

Abdy, R. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. II - Part 3, From AD 117 - 138, Hadrian. (London, 2019).
Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Blum, G. "Numismatique D'Antinoos" in JIAN 16. (Athens, 1914). pp. 33 - 70.
Calicó, E. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 2: Nerva to Antoninus Pius. (Paris, 1883).
Delegido Moran, C. Aprovisionamiento, circulación y uso de la moneda de plata en Hispania (siglos I-III d.C.): El Tesoro de Llíria. (Valencia, 2014).
Hill, P. The Dating and Arrangement of the Undated Coins of Rome, A.D. 98-148. (London, 1970).
Mattingly H. & E. Sydenham. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. II: Vespasian to Hadrian. (London, 1926).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 3: Nerva to Hadrian. (London, 1936).
McAlee, R. The Coins of Roman Antioch. (Lancaster, PA, 2007).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet. II. Trajan to Commodus (London, 1971).
Seaby, H. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Strack, P. Untersuchungen zur römischen Reichsprägung des zweiten Jahrhunderts, Teil II: Die Reichsprägung zur Zeit des Hadrian. (Stuttgart, 1933).
Toynbee, J. Roman medallions. ANSNS 5. (New York, 1944).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

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