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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Adoptive Emperors| ▸ |Hadrian||View Options:  |  |  |   

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

Hadrian, one of the "Five Good Emperors," abandoned the expansionist policy of Trajan and established a policy of defense and consolidation during which Hadrian's Wall in Britain was constructed. He traveled to nearly every province of the Empire, more than any other emperor, often ordering grandiose building programs to improve infrastructure and the quality of life in those regions. An ardent admirer of Greece, he sought to make Athens the cultural capital of the Empire and ordered the construction of many opulent temples in the city. He spent much of his time with the military; usually wore military attire and even dined and slept amongst the soldiers. He ordered military training and drilling to be more rigorous and made use of false reports of attack to keep the army alert. He suppressed the Bar Kokhba revolt in Judaea, renaming the province Syria Palaestina.Roman Empire 125 AD

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Delphi, Phokis

|Phokis|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Delphi,| |Phokis||AE| |21|
Delphi is a town on Mount Parnassus in the south of mainland Greece. It's the site of the 4th-century-B.C. Temple of Apollo, once home to a legendary oracle. This extensive mountainside archaeological complex contains the remains of the sanctuaries of Apollo and Athena Pronaia, as well as an ancient stadium and theater. Delphi Archaeological Museum displays artifacts found among the ruins.
RP111645. Bronze AE 21, RPC III 429.6 (this coin, 7 spec.); BCD Lokris 394 (this coin); Svoronos p. 36, 55, pl. XXVII, 13; BMC Central p. 28, 25 pl. IV, 16; SNG Cop 156, VF, nice green patina, light roughness, weight 5.289 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 0o, Delphi (Greece) mint, obverse AY KAI TPAIANOC AΔPIANOC AYΓ (Imperator Caesar Traianus Hadrianus Augustus), laureate bust of Hadrian right, bare chest (heroic bust), aegis on left shoulder; reverse ΔΕΛΦΩN, Apollo Citharoedus standing right, wearing long chiton and long chlamys, playing Kithara (lyre); ex Numismatica Ars Classica auction 55 (8 Oct 2010), lot 394 (price realized 1,500 CHF, plus fees); ex BCD Collection ; rare; $1800.00 SALE PRICE $1620.00


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Ascalon, Philistia, Judaea, Extremely Rare Duel Dated Variant

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Ascalon,| |Philistia,| |Judaea,| |Extremely| |Rare| |Duel| |Dated| |Variant||AE| |24|
RPC Online III notes of their specimen, "The date does seem to begin with E, even though one would expect ς with year 4 of the second era. Confirmation required. If correctly read, it might show that the Hadrianic era began at a different time of year from the normal city era, or it might just be a mistake, as commonly happened at Gaza." Our coin appears to have the expected date, but with a reversed ς.
RP111379. Bronze AE 24, Unpublished variant, RPC Online III 4014A var. (EKC, the only known specimen), VF, attractive highlighting earthen deposits, rev. off center, weight 12.265 g, maximum diameter 23.5 mm, die axis 0o, Askalon (Ashqelon, Israel) mint, 132 - 133 A.D.; obverse CEBAC-TOC (starting counterclockwise on right, ending counterclockwise on left), laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse ACKΛAW upward on left, Tyche-Astarte standing half left on prow, head left, vexillum standard in right hand, aphlaston in left hand, LΔ (year 4 [of Hadrian]) over incense altar inner left; dove standing left over ΣKC ([year] 226 [of Ascalon], Σ reversed) lower right; extremely rare; $450.00 SALE PRICE $405.00


|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||denarius|
In 122, construction of the Temple of Venus and Roma began in Rome.
RS112529. Silver denarius, RIC II-3 400, BMCRE III 217, SRCV II 3527 RSC II 1132a, Hunter II 79, VF, flow lines, light toning, edge crack/split, scratches, die wear, weight 2.888 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 210o, Rome mint, 120 - 121 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate, draped bust right, from the front; reverse P M TR P COS III, Victory standing right, holding trophy with both hands; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 129 (4 Jun 2023), lot 530; $170.00 SALE PRICE $153.00


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Struck at Rome for Use in Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Struck| |at| |Rome| |for| |Use| |in| |Syria||semis|
In 125 A.D., the Pantheon was constructed in Rome as it stands today.
RY99386. Orichalcum semis, RIC II-3 760, McAlee 552(a), BMCRE III 1356, Strack II 626, RPC Online III 3765, SNG Hunterian 2947, gVF, earthen filled fields, slightly off center on a tight flan cutting off part of legends, weight 5.069 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 124 - 125 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate and draped bust right, seen from behind; reverse COS III, Roma seated left on cuirass, right foot drawn back (no helmet), Victory bearing wreath and palm frond in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, round shield behind cuirass, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; $130.00 SALE PRICE $117.00


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Tyana, Cappadocia

|Cappadocia|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Tyana,| |Cappadocia||AE| |19|
Tyana was an ancient city in the Anatolian region of Cappadocia. Under Caracalla the city became Antoniana colonia Tyana. After having sided with Queen Zenobia of Palmyra it was captured by Aurelian in 272, who would not allow his soldiers to sack it, allegedly because Apollo appeared to him, pleading for its safety. The ruins of Tyana are at modern Kemerhisar, three miles south of Nigde. There are remains of a Roman aqueduct and of cave cemeteries and sepulchral grottoes.
RP111720. Bronze AE 19, RPC III 2956; Henseler 1517; Waddington 6805; cf. Cox Tarsus p. 59, 234 & Pl. XI (year 21), gF, green patina, porous, scratches, light earthen deposits, tight flan, weight 5.839 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, Tyana (Kemerhisar, Turkey) mint, 135 - 136 A.D.; obverse AYTO KAIC TPAI AΔPIANOC CEBACTOC, laureate head right; reverse TYANEΩN TΩN ΠP TA IEP ACY AYTO, Athena standing slightly left, head left, Victory bearing wreath and palm frond in right hand, left hand resting on grounded shield, vertical spear resting against shield, ET-K (year 20) across fields; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria, 128 - 129 A.D.

|Antioch|, |Antioch,| |Seleukis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria,| |128| |-| |129| |A.D.||trichalkon|
Michael Molnar, an astronomer, believes this coin depicts Jupiter's occultation of Aries in 6 B.C., the most probable "Star of Bethlehem." We think it is unlikely; nevertheless, the type is very popular and somewhat expensive.
GB90244. Bronze trichalkon, RPC Online III 3729, Butcher CRS 266, McAlee 125(d), SNG Hunterian II 2950, F, dark near black patina, highlighting red earthen deposits, weight 5.145 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, reign of Hadrian, 128 - 129 A.D.; obverse ANTIOXEΩN THC MHTPOΠOΛEWC, veiled and turreted head of Tyche right, weak countermark at chin; reverse ram leaping right, looking back, star within crescent above, ET ZOP (year 177 of the Caesarean Era) below; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Tiberias, Galilee, Judaea

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Tiberias,| |Galilee,| |Judaea||AE| |18|
Tiberias, on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee, was founded by Herod Antipas in 20 A.D., named in honor of the Roman emperor Tiberius. Tiberias was the capital of Galilee and for Herod Antipas. Tiberias is mentioned in John 6:23, after Jesus' miraculous feeding of 5000, a crowd seeking Jesus took boats from Tiberius across the lake. Tiberias did not participate in the Bar Kokhba revolt. Following the expulsion of Jews from Jerusalem and most of Judaea after 135, Tiberias and its neighbor Sepphoris became the major Jewish cultural centers. The Mishna and Talmud were both finished at Tiberias.
RP111763. Bronze AE 18, RPC III 3934.30 (this coin); Kindler Tiberias 8; BMC Palestine p. 9, 32; SNG ANS 1112; Sofaer 12; Rosenberger III p. 66, 14; Baramki AUB 14, aVF, nice dark green patina, marks, light earthen deposits, weight 5.383 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, Galilee, Tiberias (Israel) mint, 118 - 119 A.D.; obverse AYT TP AΔ&PIANW KAIC CEB, laureate bust of Hadrian right, aegis on left shoulder; reverse TIBEP KΛAYΔ, Nike standing slightly right, head left, wings open, wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand, wearing long chiton and peplos, date L - AP (year 101) across lower fields; ex CNG e-auction 510 (23 Feb 2022), lot 646; ex Dr. Jay M. Galst Collection; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Samosata, Commagene, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Samosata,| |Commagene,| |Syria||AE| |21|
Samosata, meaning "sun," was an ancient city whose ruins existed at the modern city of Samsat, Adiyaman Province, Turkey until the site was flooded by the Atatrk Dam. -- wikipedia.org
RP99004. Bronze AE 21, RPC III 3419; SNG Hunt 2590; SNG Munchen 376; SNG Cop Cyprus 17; Butcher p. 470, 12; BMC Galatia p. 118, 22, gVF, dark patina, uneven strike with flat areas, part of edge ragged, light earthen deposits, weight 5.450 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 180o, Samosata (site now flooded by the Atatrk Dam) mint, c. 132 - 133 A.D.; obverse AΔPIANOC CEBACTOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear; reverse ΦΛA / CAMO / MHTPO / KOM (Flavia Samosata Metropolis Commagene), inscription in four lines within oak wreath; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Perga, Pamphylia

|Perga|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Perga,| |Pamphylia||AE| |15|
Perga was the capital of Pamphylia. Today it is a large site of ancient ruins, 15 kilometers (9.3 mi) east of Antalya on the southwestern Mediterranean coast of Turkey. During the Hellenistic period, Perga was one of the richest and most beautiful cities in the ancient world, famous for its temple of Artemis. It also is notable as the home of the renowned mathematician Apollonius of Perga.Street in Perga
RP110437. Bronze AE 15, RPC Online III 2699 (5 spec.), SNG BnF 403, SNGvA 4671, SNG Cop -, BMC Lycia -, Lindgren-Kovacs -, VF, centered, attractive portrait, nice green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, scratches, weight 2.653 g, maximum diameter 15.2 mm, die axis 180o, Perga (near Antalya, Turkey) mint, 11 Aug 117 - 10 Jul 138 A.D.; obverse KAICAP AΔPIANOC, laureate bust right, drapery on far shoulder; reverse ΠEPΓ APTEMI, cult statue of Artemis of Perge in temple with two columns, eagle in pediment; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Caesarea Maritima, Samaria, Judaea

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Caesarea| |Maritima,| |Samaria,| |Judaea||AE| |17|
Caesarea, about 30 miles north of Joppa and about 70 miles northwest of Jerusalem, was the capital of the Roman province of Judaea, the seat of the procurators, and the headquarters of the Roman troops. It was founded by Herod the Great and named after Caesar Augustus. This city is the location of the 1961 discovery of the Pilate Stone, the only archaeological item that mentions the Roman prefect Pontius Pilate, by whose order Jesus was crucified. Its ruins are a national park on the Mediterranean coast of Israel, about halfway between Tel Aviv and Haifa.
RP111373. Bronze AE 17, RPC III 3961; SNG ANS 771; SNG Cop 6; Kadman Caesarea 29; Rosenberger II 25; Sofaer 31; BMC Palestine p. 21, 69; De Saulcy 2, Baramki AUB 23, gF, dark green patina, highlighting buff earthen deposits, off center, weight 7.152 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 0o, Caesarea Maritima (Keisaria, Israel) mint, 11 Aug 117 - 10 Jul 138 A.D.; obverse IMP TRA HADRIANO CAE, laureate and draped bust right; reverse C I F AVG CAESAR (Colonia Prima Flavia Augusta Caesarea), Apollo standing left, nude but for chlamys around neck and over left arm, extending right hand to snake rising up before him, resting left elbow on tripod lebes behind; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00




  



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OBVERSE LEGENDS

AVGVSTVSHADRIANVS
AVGVSTVSHADRIANVSPP
DIVVSHADRIANVSAVG
HADRIANVSAVGCOSIIIPP
HADRIANVSAVGVST
HADRIANVSAVGVSTVS
HADRIANVSAVGVSTVSPP
IMPCAEDITRAIANFDIVNERNEPTRAHADRIANOAVG
IMPCAEDIRAPARFDIVINERNEPTRAHADRIANOAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIAHADRIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIANHADRIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIANVSHADRIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIANVSHADRIANVSAVGPMTRPCOSIII
IMPCAESHADRIANDIVINERTRAIANOPTFIL
IMPCAESTRAHADRIANOAVGPP
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOAVGDIVITRA
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOAVGDIVITRAPARTHF
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOPTAVGGERDAC
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOOPTAVGGERDAC


REFERENCES

Abdy, R. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. II - Part 3, From AD 117 - 138, Hadrian. (London, 2019).
Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Blum, G. "Numismatique D'Antinoos" in JIAN 16. (Athens, 1914). pp. 33 - 70.
Calic, E. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 2: Nerva to Antoninus Pius. (Paris, 1883).
Delegido Moran, C. Aprovisionamiento, circulacin y uso de la moneda de plata en Hispania (siglos I-III d.C.): El Tesoro de Llria. (Valencia, 2014).
Hill, P. The Dating and Arrangement of the Undated Coins of Rome, A.D. 98-148. (London, 1970).
Mattingly H. & E. Sydenham. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. II: Vespasian to Hadrian. (London, 1926).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 3: Nerva to Hadrian. (London, 1936).
McAlee, R. The Coins of Roman Antioch. (Lancaster, PA, 2007).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet. II. Trajan to Commodus (London, 1971).
Seaby, H. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Strack, P. Untersuchungen zur rmischen Reichsprgung des zweiten Jahrhunderts, Teil II: Die Reichsprägung zur Zeit des Hadrian. (Stuttgart, 1933).
Toynbee, J. Roman medallions. ANSNS 5. (New York, 1944).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

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