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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Adoptive Emperors| ▸ |Hadrian||View Options:  |  |  |   

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

Hadrian, one of the "Five Good Emperors," abandoned the expansionist policy of Trajan and established a policy of defense and consolidation during which Hadrian's Wall in Britain was constructed. He traveled to nearly every province of the Empire, more than any other emperor, often ordering grandiose building programs to improve infrastructure and the quality of life in those regions. An ardent admirer of Greece, he sought to make Athens the cultural capital of the Empire and ordered the construction of many opulent temples in the city. He spent much of his time with the military; usually wore military attire and even dined and slept amongst the soldiers. He ordered military training and drilling to be more rigorous and made use of false reports of attack to keep the army alert. He suppressed the Bar Kokhba revolt in Judaea, renaming the province Syria Palaestina.Roman Empire 125 AD

Roman Egypt, Antinoopolites Nome, Portrait of Antinous, c. 30 Oct 130 - 300 A.D.

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Roman| |Egypt,| |Antinoopolites| |Nome,| |Portrait| |of| |Antinous,| |c.| |30| |Oct| |130| |-| |300| |A.D.||tessera|
Antinous probably joined Hadrian's entourage when it passed through Bithynia about 124 A.D. He became Hadrian's constant companion and lover. In October 130 Antinous drowned in the Nile. Hadrian's grief knew no bounds; he enrolled him among the gods, erected a temple, and on 30 October 130, Hadrian founded the city of Antinoopolis on the very bank of the Nile river where Antinous drowned. It was the capital of a new nome, Antinoopolites. Perhaps the date is from the founding of Antinoopolis. There began a Cult of Antinous. Artists vied with each other in immortalizing his beauty. Temples and statues dedicated to him were erected all over the Empire.
AG97755. Glass tessera, Dattari (Savio) (but cf. 6551-6551 for other glass tesserae of different types), green hue, manufacturing flaw at 12h, otherwise intact., weight 1.67 g, maximum diameter 18 mm, Antinopolis Nome mint, c. 30 Oct 130 - 300 A.D.; obverse draped bust of Antinos right, wearing hem-hem crown, crescent before; reverse blank; ex CNG e-sale 481 (25 Nov 2020), lot 280; rare; $500.00 SALE PRICE $450.00


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Amisos, Pontos

|Pontos|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Amisos,| |Pontos||drachm|
The Romans conquered Amisus in 71 B.C. during the Third Mithridatic War and Amisus became part of Bithynia et Pontus province. Around 46 B.C., during the reign of Julius Caesar, Amisus became the capital of Roman Pontus. From the period of the Second Triumvirate up to Nero, Pontus was ruled by several client kings, as well as a queen, Pythodorida of Pontus, a granddaughter of Mark Antony. From 62 A.D. it was directly ruled by Roman governors, most famously by Trajan's appointee Pliny the Younger. The estimated population of the city around 150 A.D. was between 20,000 and 25,000, a large city for that time. The city functioned as the commercial capital for the province of Pontus; beating its rival Sinope due to its position at the head of the trans-Anatolia highway.
RS99248. Silver drachm, RPC III 1279 (5 spec.), Recueil Gnral 91, Nordb Amisus 5b, BMC Pontus -, gF, dark spots, part of obv. legend unstruck, tiny edge cracks, weight 2.699 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 210o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, year 167, 135 - 136 A.D.; obverse AYT KAI TPA A∆PI-ANOC CEB Π Π YΠ Γ, laureate head right; reverse AMICOV EΛEVΘEPAC ETOVC PΞZ (Amisos, free city, [year] 167), Hera standing left, wearing diadem, apple in right hand, scepter in left hand; first example of this type handled by Forum, zero sales of this type listed on Coin Archives in the last two decades; very rare; $300.00 SALE PRICE $270.00


|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||as|
Curtis Clay convincingly argues that Hadrian's "travel" coins naming provinces, including those having him arrive in a province, with "ADVENTVS" legends, restoring a province, with "RESTITVTORI" legends, and those having him address a provincial army, with "EXERCITVS" legends, were actually issued beginning soon after his safe return to Rome from his second journey in 131 A.D. Most references date them after 134 A.D.
RB99084. Copper as, RIC II-3 1615 (S), BMCRE III 1714, Cohen II 145, Strack 708, SRCV II 3673, Hunter II 604 var. (bare head), aVF, excellent portrait, centered on a tight flan, toned bare (cleaned) copper, light corrosion, weight 11.255 g, maximum diameter 25.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 131 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate bust right, seen from behind; reverse AFRICA, Africa reclining left, wearing elephant scalp headdress, scorpion in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, basket with fruits and grain before her, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; ex Numismatic Naumann auction 104 (4 Jul 2021), lot 821; scarce; $220.00 SALE PRICE $198.00 ON RESERVE


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Struck at Rome for Use in Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Struck| |at| |Rome| |for| |Use| |in| |Syria||semis|NEW
In 125 A.D., the Pantheon was constructed in Rome as it stands today.
RY99386. Orichalcum semis, RIC II-3 760, McAlee 552(a), BMCRE III 1356, Strack II 626, RPC Online III 3765, SNG Hunterian 2947, gVF, earthen filled fields, slightly off center on a tight flan cutting off part of legends, weight 5.069 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 124 - 125 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate and draped bust right, seen from behind; reverse COS III, Roma seated left on cuirass, right foot drawn back (no helmet), Victory bearing wreath and palm frond in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, round shield behind cuirass, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; $180.00 SALE PRICE $162.00


|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||denarius|
Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good fortune, and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RS98759. Silver denarius, RIC II-3 221, RSC II 1143, BMCRE III 169, Hunter II 42, Strack II 111, SRCV II -, aVF, edge crack, weight 3.138 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, 119 - c. 120 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust right with bare-chest, drapery on left shoulder; reverse P M TR P COS III (Pontifex Maximus, Tribunitia Potestas, Consul Tertium - high priest, holder of tribunitian power, consul for the 3rd time), Felicitas standing slightly left, head left, caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; ex Numismatic Naumann auction 110 (7 Nov 2021), part of lot 1542; $160.00 SALE PRICE $144.00


|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||denarius|
The Romans believed that Fortuna, after deserting the Persians and Assyrians, took flight over Macedonia and saw Alexander perish as she passed into Egypt and into Syria. At last arriving on Mount Palatine, she threw aside her wings and casting away her wheel, entered Rome where she took up her abode forever. Fortuna was the goddess of fortune and fate, and the personification of luck. She might bring good luck, or bad and distributed good and evil among mankind according to her caprice and without any regard to merit.
RS98771. Silver denarius, RIC II-3 2012.A1+ (S), BMCRE III 641, RSC II 775a, Strack 239, Hunter II 212 var. (draped), SRCV II -, Choice aVF, well centered, flow lines, die wear, small edge cracks, weight 3.478 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 133 - c. 135 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, bare-headed bearded head right; reverse FORTVNA AVG (good fortune of the Emperor), Fortuna standing half left, head left, pater in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; ex Numismatic Naumann auction 110 (7 Nov 2021), part of lot 1542; scarce; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||denarius|
During the reign of Hadrian the denarius averaged 87% silver.
RS98751. Silver denarius, RIC II-3 2224, RSC II 963, BMCRE III 677, Hunter II 222, Strack II 251, SRCV II 3507 var. (slight drapery), Choice gF, centered, flow lines, light toning, small edge cracks, weight 3.318 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 136 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, bare head right; reverse MONETA AVG, Moneta standing left, cornucopia in left hand, scales in right hand; ex Numismatic Naumann auction 110 (7 Nov 2021), part of lot 1542; $140.00 SALE PRICE $126.00


|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||denarius|
Justitia is the Roman goddess or personification of justice. She was not depicted on many Roman coin types. Perhaps this coin would make a nice gift for a lawyer or judge!
RS98754. Silver denarius, RIC II-3 117, RSC II 877, BMCRE III 74, Strack II 36, Hunter II -, SRCV II -, Choice gF, nice portrait, well centered, light toning, flow lines, small edge cracks, weight 3.038 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 118 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust right, drapery on far shoulder; reverse P M TR P COS II, Justitia seated left on throne with high back, patera in extended right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand, IVSTITIA in exergue; ex Numismatic Naumann auction 110 (7 Nov 2021), part of lot 1542; $140.00 SALE PRICE $126.00


|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||denarius|
There are peculiarities about these Roman crescent and star reverse types that are difficult to understand. First, the crescents are almost always depicted with the horns up. The moon is never seen this way in the sky. Also, in the sky stars are never visible within the horns of the crescent moon because there they would be behind the shadowed yet solid and opaque orb.
RS98755. Silver denarius, RIC II-3 864.A2 (S), RSC II 460, BMC III 457, Hunter II 156, Strack 186, SRCV II 3484, aVF, light toning, edge splits, weight 3.045 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, 128 - c. 129 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse COS III, star within and above crescent moon; ex Numismatic Naumann auction 110 (7 Nov 2021), part of lot 1542; $140.00 SALE PRICE $126.00


|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||denarius|
Under Hadrian, Roman bakeries produce dozens of bread varieties, and the Romans distribute free bread for the poor but Roman agriculture declined. Imports from Egypt and North Africa depressed wheat prices, making it unprofitable to farm, and forcing many farmers off the land.
RS98756. Silver denarius, RIC II-3 916, RSC II 363, Hunter II 170, BMCRE III 497 var. (drapery), Strack II 209, SRCV II -, Choice gF, well centered, radiating flow lines, light marks, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.378 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 128 - c. 129 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS P P, laureate head right; reverse COS III, Victory seated left on stool, wreath in extended right hand, palm frond in left hand; ex Numismatic Naumann auction 110 (7 Nov 2021), part of lot 1542; $140.00 SALE PRICE $126.00




  



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|OBVERSE |LEGENDS

AVGVSTVSHADRIANVS
AVGVSTVSHADRIANVSPP
DIVVSHADRIANVSAVG
HADRIANVSAVGCOSIIIPP
HADRIANVSAVGVST
HADRIANVSAVGVSTVS
HADRIANVSAVGVSTVSPP
IMPCAEDITRAIANFDIVNERNEPTRAHADRIANOAVG
IMPCAEDIRAPARFDIVINERNEPTRAHADRIANOAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIAHADRIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIANHADRIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIANVSHADRIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIANVSHADRIANVSAVGPMTRPCOSIII
IMPCAESHADRIANDIVINERTRAIANOPTFIL
IMPCAESTRAHADRIANOAVGPP
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOAVGDIVITRA
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOAVGDIVITRAPARTHF
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOPTAVGGERDAC
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOOPTAVGGERDAC


REFERENCES|

Abdy, R. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. II - Part 3, From AD 117 - 138, Hadrian. (London, 2019).
Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Blum, G. "Numismatique D'Antinoos" in JIAN 16. (Athens, 1914). pp. 33 - 70.
Calic, E. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 2: Nerva to Antoninus Pius. (Paris, 1883).
Delegido Moran, C. Aprovisionamiento, circulacin y uso de la moneda de plata en Hispania (siglos I-III d.C.): El Tesoro de Llria. (Valencia, 2014).
Hill, P. The Dating and Arrangement of the Undated Coins of Rome, A.D. 98-148. (London, 1970).
Mattingly H. & E. Sydenham. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. II: Vespasian to Hadrian. (London, 1926).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 3: Nerva to Hadrian. (London, 1936).
McAlee, R. The Coins of Roman Antioch. (Lancaster, PA, 2007).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet. II. Trajan to Commodus (London, 1971).
Seaby, H. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Strack, P. Untersuchungen zur rmischen Reichsprgung des zweiten Jahrhunderts, Teil II: Die Reichsprägung zur Zeit des Hadrian. (Stuttgart, 1933).
Toynbee, J. Roman medallions. ANSNS 5. (New York, 1944).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

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