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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Personifications| ▸ |Democracy||View Options:  |  |  | 

Democracy (Demos - The People)

The image of Demos, the personification of the People, was used on ancient coinage as early as the 5th century BC. In Roman times, many towns under Roman domination struck pseudo-autonomous coinage depicting either the bust or head of Demos, or showed him standing with the emperor, Boule, or the Demos of another city.

Here we will also include coins that depict personifications of the Senate, citizens councilman (boule), and elders (gerousia), and any coin that depicts voting.

Eumeneia, Phrygia, c. 244 - 249 A.D.

|Eumeneia|, |Eumeneia,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |244| |-| |249| |A.D.||AE| |23|
Eumenia, Phrygia was founded by Attalus II Philadelphus (159 - 138 B.C.) at the source of the Cludrus, near the Glaucus, and named after his brother Eumenes. Numerous inscriptions and many coins remain to show that Eumenia was an important and prosperous city under Roman rule. As early as the third century its population was in great part Christian, and it seems to have suffered much during the persecution of Diocletian. The remains of Eumenia are located in Denizli Province, Turkey on the shore of Lake Isikli near Civril.
RP97255. Bronze AE 23, RPC Online VIII U20608 (8 spec., 2 var.); BMC Phrygia p. 214, 24; Lindgren III 583; SNG Cop 389 var. (leg. from upper r.); SNGvA 3586 var. (same), VF, green patina, rough areas, scattered porosity, weight 7.002 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 180o, Eumeneia (near Civril, Turkey) mint, reign of Philip I, c. 244 - 249 A.D.; obverse •IEPA• CVNKΛHTOC (clockwise from the lower left), bare-headed, draped bust of the Senate right; reverse EVMENEΩ-N AXAIΩN, cult image of Artemis Ephesia standing facing, wearing kalathos and veil, with arm supports, between two stags standing facing outward with heads turned back towards the goddess; ex Savoca Numismatik, silver auction 82 (26 Jul 2020), lot 247; this coin is the primary plate coin for the type in RPC Online VIII; rare; $170.00 SALE PRICE $153.00
 


Daldis, Lydia, 69 - 79 A.D.

|Other| |Lydia|, |Daldis,| |Lydia,| |69| |-| |79| |A.D.||hemiassarion|
The Zeus who was worshiped at Laodicea was a Hellenized form of the old native god, Mên. Mên had been the king and father of his people. When Greeks settled in the area they continued to worship the god whose power was supreme in the district, but they identified him with their own god Zeus. Thus at Sardis and elsewhere in the region the native god became Zeus Lydios.
GB96503. Bronze hemiassarion, GRPCL 4; RPC Online II 1325 (12 spec.); BMC Lydia p. 70, 2; SNG Cop 110, F, green patina, tight flan cutting off much of legends, legends weak, earthen deposits, weight 3.818 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 0o, Daldis (near Narlïkale, Turkey) mint, time of Vespasian, 69 - 79 A.D.; obverse ΘEON CYNKΛHTON, draped bust of the Senate right; reverse EΠI TI ΦΛA YΛA ΦΛA KAICAP ∆AΛ∆I (struck under Titus Flavius Hylas [at] Flaviocaesaria Daldis), Zeus Lydios standing left, wearing long chiton and himation, eagle in right hand, scepter in left hand; rare; $130.00 SALE PRICE $117.00
 


Cotiaeum, Phrygia, c. 235 - 238 A.D. Diogenes, Archon

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Cotiaeum,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |235| |-| |238| |A.D.| |Diogenes,| |Archon||diassarion|
The image of Demos, the personification of the People, was used on ancient coinage as early as the 5th century B.C. In Roman times, many towns under Roman domination struck pseudo-autonomous coinage depicting either the bust or head of Demos, or showed him standing with the Emperor, Boule (the city council), or the Demos of another city.
RP97257. Bronze diassarion, SNG Cop 318 - 319; BMC Phrygia p. 162, 20, SNGvA 3776, SNG Righetti 1165, Kurth Demos 398, Martin Demos 16, VF, well centered on a broad flan, nice dark green patina, light earthen deposits, light marks, some die wear, weight 7.915 g, maximum diameter 25.8 mm, die axis 0o, Cotiaeum (Kütahya, Turkey) mint, time of Valerian I - Gallienus, c. 235 - 238 A.D.; obverse ∆HMOC (Demos) KOTIAEΩN, diademed bust of the Demos to right, slight drapery over far shoulder; reverse EΠI ∆IOΓENOVC ∆IONVCIOV (struck under Diogenes, son of Dionysios), Zeus seated left on a low backless throne, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, A-PX (archon - Diogenes' title) divided across fields, KOTIAEΩN in exergue; rare; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00
 


Sardes, Lydia, 90 - 100 A.D.

|Sardes|, |Sardes,| |Lydia,| |90| |-| |100| |A.D.||AE| |18|
Sardis was the capital of the ancient kingdom of Lydia, one of the important cities of the Persian Empire, the seat of a proconsul under the Roman Empire, and the metropolis of the province Lydia in later Roman and Byzantine times. Its importance was due first to its military strength, secondly to its situation on an important highway leading from the interior to the Aegean coast, and thirdly to its commanding the wide and fertile plain of the Hermus. As one of the Seven churches of Asia, it was addressed by John, the author of the Book of Revelation in the Holy Bible, in terms which seem to imply that its population was notoriously soft and fainthearted. Remains include a bath-gymnasium complex, synagogue and Byzantine shops.
RP98168. Bronze AE 18, RPC III 2410 (spec. 8 same dies); GRPC Lydia 299; SNG Tübingen 3801; SNG Munich 493; Waddington 5224; Mionnet IV 684, F, attractive highlighting earthen deposits, scratches, mild porosity, rev. a little off center, weight 3.654 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 90 - 100 A.D.; obverse IEPA CYNKΛ-HTOC (clockwise from upper right), bare headed, draped bust of the Senate right; reverse CAP∆-IANΩN (clockwise from lower left), hexastyle temple with three steps; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00
 


Annia Faustina, Augusta, 221 A.D., Third Wife of Elagabalus, Hierapolis, Phrygia

|Hierapolis|, |Annia| |Faustina,| |Augusta,| |221| |A.D.,| |Third| |Wife| |of| |Elagabalus,| |Hierapolis,| |Phrygia||AE| |23|
In 221, after Elagabalus was induced to end his highly controversial marriage to the Vestal Virgin Aquilia Severa, he married the recently widowed Annia Aurelia Faustina. The marriage was intended to form an alliance with the powerful aristocratic Nerva-Antonine clan, resulting from her blood relation to the dynasty. Elagabalus gave her the title of Augusta. Supporters of Elagabalus had hoped that Annia, the mother of two small children from her previous marriage, would bear him a natural heir; however, she bore him no children. There are no surviving sources providing details of Annia Aurelia Faustina's short time as a Roman empress. Before the end of 221, Elagabalus divorced her and returned to Julia Aquilia Severa. After her marriage to Elagabalus ended, she returned with her children to her Pisidian Estate where she spent the final years of her life.

The AKTIA festival and games at Hierapolis were founded in honor of Augustus' victory at Actium.
RP77251. Bronze AE 23, Johnston Hierapolis 74; BMC Phrygia p. 242, 89; SNG Cop 444; Waddington 6128; SNGvA -; SNG Tüb -; SNG Hunterian -; SNG Leypold -; Weber -; McClean -, aF, weight 7.085 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 180o, Phrygia, Hierapolis (near Pamukkale, Turkey) mint, c. 221 - 268 A.D.; obverse IEPA•CY-NKΛHTO-C, draped bust of the senate right; reverse IEPAΠOΛEITΩN NEΩKOPΩN, A/KTI/A in three lines within a demos crown (laurel wreath); very rare; SOLD


Hierapolis, Phrygia, in Homonoia with Ephesos, 253 - 260 A.D.

|Hierapolis|, |Hierapolis,| |Phrygia,| |in| |Homonoia| |with| |Ephesos,| |253| |-| |260| |A.D.||diassarion|
The title NEOKOPON on the reverse of this type, and other similar coins, has been the topic of debate for more than a century. Hierapolis was honored with a neokoros (imperial temple) either during the reign of Caracalla or Elagabalus. Caracalla rarely gave this honor, but if the honor was given by Caracalla, it would have lasted many decades. If the honor was given during the reign of Elagabalus, as many numismatists and historians believe, it would have been lost with his damnatio. Yet, the title appears here, on a coin struck long after Elagabalus' demise. This coin, however, was struck by Hierapolis honoring its alliance (homonoia) with Ephesos, Ionia. After Elagabalus, at Hierapolis, neokoros titles only appear on homonoia coinage. It seems odd, especially since the title is on the reverse with the name Hierapolis, but the most supported argument is that NEOKOPON refers to a temple at Ephesos, not one at Hierapolis.
RP97256. Bronze diassarion, Franke-Nolle, type IX, 760 - 763 (B/49); Weber HpH p. 74 (A/b); Johnston Hierapolis -; BMC Phrygia -; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; SNG Mün -; SNG Tüb -, gVF, well centered and struck with full legends, nice dark green patina, some porosity, weight 5.120 g, maximum diameter 23.5 mm, die axis 180o, Phrygia, Hierapolis (near Pamukkale, Turkey) mint, time of Valerius and Gallienus, 253 - 260 A.D.; obverse OMONY/A - K EΦEC-IΩN (clockwise from 3:00), laureate, veiled, and draped bust of Boule right; reverse IEPAΠ-O-ΛEITΩN; NEOKO-PΩN in fields, clockwise from lower left, Nike advancing left, wreath in extended right hand, palm frond against left shoulder in left hand; ex Leu Numismatik web auction 13 (15 August 2020), lot 886; this coin is one of only two specimens of this type listed in Coin Archives auction records spanning the last two decades; very rare; SOLD







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REFERENCES|

Kurth, D. Demos, The Personification of the People. (2010).
Martin, K. Demos, Boule, Gerousia: Personifikationen städtischer Institutionen auf kaiserzeitlichen Münzen aus Kleinasien. (Bonn, 2013).


Catalog current as of Friday, January 28, 2022.
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