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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Numismatics| ▸ |Pseudo-Autonomous||View Options:  |  |  | 

Pseudo-Autonomous Roman Provincial

Coins minted by the cities and provinces of the Roman empire without the emperor's portrait on the obverse are described as pseudo-autonomous Roman provincial (or Greek Imperial) coins.

Palmyra, Palmyrene, Syria, c. 150 - 225 A.D.

|Other| |Syria|, |Palmyra,| |Palmyrene,| |Syria,| |c.| |150| |-| |225| |A.D.||AE| |12|
Palmyra, a city in a large oasis in the Syrian Desert, 215 km northeast of Damascus, was the vital silk road caravan stop known as "the Bride of the Desert." Atargatis was the chief goddess of northern Syria, primarily a fertility goddess, but, she was also responsible for the protection and well-being of the people. Her chief sanctuary was at Hierapolis, modern Manbij, northeast of Aleppo, Syria. The Romans called her Dea Syria.
GB95894. Bronze AE 12, SNG Munchen 519; BMC Galatia p. 149, 2; Krzyzanowska Monnayage IV; SNG Cop -, gF, dark patina, earthen deposits, weight 1.663 g, maximum diameter 12.0 mm, die axis 0o, Palmyra mint, c. 150 - 225 A.D.; obverse Atargatis bust facing, head left, wearing turreted crown, thin crescent left, star right; reverse radiate bust of young Malakbel (solar deity) left; extremely rare; $300.00 (276.00)


Daldis, Lydia, 69 - 79 A.D.

|Other| |Lydia|, |Daldis,| |Lydia,| |69| |-| |79| |A.D.||hemiassarion|
The Zeus who was worshiped at Laodicea was a Hellenized form of the old native god, Mn. Mn had been the king and father of his people. When Greeks settled in the area they continued to worship the god whose power was supreme in the district, but they identified him with their own god Zeus. Thus at Sardis and elsewhere in the region the native god became Zeus Lydios.
GB96503. Bronze hemiassarion, GRPC Lydia 4; RPC Online II 1325 (12 spec.); BMC Lydia p. 70, 2; SNG Cop 110, F, green patina, tight flan cutting off much of legends, legends weak, earthen deposits, weight 3.818 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 0o, Daldis (near Narlkale, Turkey) mint, time of Vespasian, 69 - 79 A.D.; obverse ΘEON CYNKΛHTON, draped bust of the Senate right; reverse EΠI TI ΦΛA YΛA ΦΛA KAICAP ∆AΛ∆I (struck under Titus Flavius Hylas [at] Flaviocaesaria Daldis), Zeus Lydios standing left, wearing long chiton and himation, eagle in right hand, scepter in left hand; rare; $150.00 (138.00)


Termessos Major, Pisidia, 3rd Century A.D.

|Pisidia|, |Termessos| |Major,| |Pisidia,| |3rd| |Century| |A.D.||AE| |38|
Alexander the Great likened Termessos, high in the Taurus Mountains, to an eagle's nest after he surrounded it but failed to conquer it in 333 B.C. An ally of Rome, Termessos was granted independent status by the Roman Senate in 71 B.C. Independence was maintained continuously for a long time, the only exception being an alliance with Amyntas king of Galatia (reigned 36 - 25 B.C.). This independence is documented also by the coins of Termessos, which bear the title "Autonomous." Termessos was abandoned after its aqueduct was destroyed by an earthquake (date unknown).
GB83542. Bronze AE 38, SNGvA 5364; BMC Lycia p. 273, 41; SNG BnF -; SNG Cop -; SNG PfPs -; SNG Righetti -; SNG Tb -, aVF, green patina, rough, pitting, corrosion, smoothing, edge chip, central cavities, weight 28.152 g, maximum diameter 37.8 mm, die axis 0o, Termessos Major mint, pseudo-autonomous, c. 238 - 268 A.D.; obverse TEPMHCCEΩN AVTONOMΩN, laureate and bearded head of Zeus right; reverse TΩN MEIZONΩN, Athena standing slightly left, head left, wearing helmet, long chiton, and peplos, holding Nike offering wreath in right hand, spear in left hand, shield at feet on far side of right leg, trophy of captured arms behind, Θ left; about twice the weight of the similar smaller and less rare coin with the same types (SNG BnF 2189, AE33, 14.06g); very rare; $100.00 (92.00)


Sardes, Lydia, c. 212 - 217 A.D.

|Sardes|, |Sardes,| |Lydia,| |c.| |212| |-| |217| |A.D.||AE| |16|
The Zeus who was worshiped at Laodicea was a Hellenized form of the old native god, Men. Men had been the king and father of his people. When Greeks settled in the area they continued to worship the god whose power was supreme in the district, but they identified him with their own god Zeus. Thus at Sardis and elsewhere in the region the native god became Zeus Lydios.
RP92868. Bronze AE 16, SNG Munchen 499; BMC Lydia p. 248, 86; Johnston Sardis 262; Lindgren-Kovacs A809A; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -, aVF, well centered, dark green patina, porosity, weight 1.991 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 180o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, time of Caracalla, c. 212 - 217 A.D.; obverse ZEYC - ΛY∆IOC, diademed and draped bust of Zeus Lydios right; reverse CAP∆IANΩN, Herakles standing facing, head left, resting right hand on grounded club, Nemean lionskin on left arm; scarce; $70.00 (64.40)


Selge, Pisidia, c. 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Pisidia|, |Selge,| |Pisidia,| |c.| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.||chalkous|
Selge, Pisidia on the southern slope of Mount Taurus where the river Eurymedon (Kprcay) forces its way through the mountains, was once the most powerful and populous city of Pisidia. Protected by precipices, torrents, and an army of 20,000 regarded as worthy kinsmen of the Spartans, Selge was never subject to a foreign power until Rome. In the 5th century A.D., Zosimus calls it a little town, but it was still strong enough to repel a body of Goths. The remains of the city consist mainly of parts of the encircling wall and of the acropolis. A few traces have survived of the gymnasium, the stoa, the stadium and the basilica. There are also the outlines of two temples, but the best-conserved monument is the theater, restored in the 3rd century A.D.
GB86928. Bronze chalkous, SNG BnF 1979; SNG Cop 263; SNGvA 5288; SNG PfPs 368; BMC Pisidia p. 262, 47; SGCV II 5491, VF, dark blue-green patina, die wear, tight flan (as usual for the type), weight 3.092 g, maximum diameter 12.4 mm, die axis 0o, Selge (southern slope of Mount Taurus, Turkey) mint, c. 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse bearded head of Herakles right, club over left shoulder; reverse winged thunderbolt, arc (bow?) on right, top end of arc ornamented with a stag head, Σ−E−Λ divided low across field; $60.00 (55.20)







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