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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Macedonia| ▸ |Amphipolis||View Options:  |  |  | 

Amphipolis, Macedonia
Macedonian Kingdom, Lysimachos, as Satrap of Thrace, 323 - 305 B.C., Struck by Kassander

|Macedonia|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Lysimachos,| |as| |Satrap| |of| |Thrace,| |323| |-| |305| |B.C.,| |Struck| |by| |Kassander||unit|
This type was likely struck by Kassander at Amphipolis for Lysimachos, perhaps while Lysimachos was battling the Thracian tribes. With the support of Antigonus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, Kassander defeated Polyperchon, and declared himself the Macedonian regent in 317 B.C. Lysimachos was satrap in Thrace and some adjoining territory, an area without a royal mint. Lysimachos and Kassander were related by marriage and bound by mutual trust, respect, and unwavering friendship. Kassander likely supplied the bulk of Lysimachos monetary needs, perhaps even until Lysimacus gained control of mints in Anatolia after Ipsus.
GB112855. Bronze unit, Price p. 133, P4; SNG ANS 998; Thompson 2 (Lysimachia mint, 306 - 300 B.C.); SNG Alpha Bank -; SNG Cop -, F, nice green patina, corrosion, weight 5,562 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 315o, Amphipolis mint, c. 317 - 305 B.C.; obverse head of Apollo right, wearing taenia; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY, young male rider galloping right, ΛY to the left of lion forepart right below; scarce; $110.00 (€103.40)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Lysimachos, as Satrap of Thrace, 323 - 305 B.C., Struck by Kassander

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Lysimachos,| |as| |Satrap| |of| |Thrace,| |323| |-| |305| |B.C.,| |Struck| |by| |Kassander||unit|
This type was likely struck by Kassander at Amphipolis for Lysimachos, perhaps while Lysimachos was battling the Thracian tribes. With the support of Antigonus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, Kassander defeated Polyperchon, and declared himself the Macedonian regent in 317 B.C. Lysimachos was satrap in Thrace and some adjoining territory, an area without a royal mint. Lysimachos and Kassander were related by marriage and bound by mutual trust, respect, and unwavering friendship. Kassander likely supplied the bulk of Lysimachos monetary needs, perhaps even until Lysimacus gained control of mints in Anatolia after Ipsus.
GB112982. Bronze unit, Price p. 133, P4; SNG ANS 998; Thompson 2 (Lysimachia mint, 306 - 300 B.C.); SNG Alpha Bank -; SNG Cop -, gF, green patina, spots of corrosion, weight 5.202 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 125o, Amphipolis mint, c. 317 - 305 B.C.; obverse head of Apollo right, wearing taenia; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY, young male rider galloping right, holding palm branch; bow lower left, ΛY to the left of lion forepart right below; scarce; $110.00 (€103.40)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Lysimachos, as Satrap of Thrace, 323 - 305 B.C., Struck by Kassander

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Lysimachos,| |as| |Satrap| |of| |Thrace,| |323| |-| |305| |B.C.,| |Struck| |by| |Kassander||AE| |18|
This type was likely struck by Kassander at Amphipolis for Lysimachos, perhaps while Lysimachos was battling the Thracian tribes. With the support of Antigonus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, Kassander defeated Polyperchon, and declared himself the Macedonian regent in 317 B.C. Lysimachos was satrap in Thrace and some adjoining territory, an area without a royal mint. Lysimachos and Kassander were related by marriage and bound by mutual trust, respect, and unwavering friendship. Kassander likely supplied the bulk of Lysimachos monetary needs, perhaps even until Lysimacus gained control of mints in Anatolia after Ipsus.
GB111744. Bronze AE 18, Price p. 133, P4; SNG ANS 998; Thompson 2 (Lysimachia mint, 306 - 300 B.C.); SNG Alpha Bank -; SNG Cop -, F, dark patina, light earthen deposits, scratches, pitting, weight 6.359 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 90o, Macedonia, Amphipolis mint, c. 317 - 305 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Apollo right; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY, nude horseman cantering right, ΛY lower left, lion forepart right below; scarce; $80.00 (€75.20)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Kassander, c. 319 - 297 B.C.

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Kassander,| |c.| |319| |-| |297| |B.C.||AE| |20|
Antipater's son but not his heir, Kassander seized power in 317 B.C. He had no intention of surrendering rule to Alexander's son, who was to be king when he came of age. In 311 B.C., Kassander had Alexander's young son and the boy's mother, Roxane, murdered. In 305 B.C., he declared himself king of Macedonia. Kassander restored peace and prosperity to the kingdom, while founding or restoring numerous cities (including Thessalonica, Cassandreia, and Thebes). He was, however, so ambitious, unscrupulous, and ruthlessness that even members of his own family were estranged from him.
GB111746. Bronze AE 20, cf. SNG Alpha Bank 923 (monogram), SNG Cop 1142 ff. var. (various control symbols), F, green patina, weight 6.289 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 180o, Pella or Amphipolis mint, 305 - 297 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ KAΣΣANΔPOY, horseman riding right, arm raised, ΔI on right, monogram below; $80.00 (€75.20)
 


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

|Amphipolis|, |Severus| |Alexander,| |13| |March| |222| |-| |March| |235| |A.D.,| |Amphipolis,| |Macedonia||AE| |24|
Tyche (Greek for luck; the Roman equivalent was Fortuna) was the presiding tutelary deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. Increasingly during the Hellenistic period, cities had their own specific iconic version of Tyche, wearing a mural crown (a crown like the walls of the city).
RP97773. Bronze AE 24, Varbanov III 3298 (R4); SNG Cop 118; BMC Macedonia p. 59, 133 var. (obv. leg.); SNG ANS 203 var. (same); AMNG III -, aVF, excellent portrait, green patina, light deposits, reverse off center, edge cracks, weight 6.894 g, maximum diameter 23.5 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, 13 Mar 222 - Mar 235 A.D.; obverse AVT K M AVP CEV AΛEΞANΔPOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITΩN, turreted city goddess enthroned left, patera in extended right hand, fish left in exergue; $50.00 (€47.00)
 


Caligula, 16 March 37 - 24 January 41 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

|Amphipolis|, |Caligula,| |16| |March| |37| |-| |24| |January| |41| |A.D.,| |Amphipolis,| |Macedonia||AE| |17|
Amphipolis was on the Via Egnatia, the principal Roman road crossing the southern Balkans. In 50, the apostle Paul visited Amphipolis on his way to Thessaloniki. Many Christian churches were built indicating prosperity, but the region grew increasingly dangerous. In the 6th century, the population had declined considerably and the old perimeter was no longer defensible against Slavic invasions. The lower city was plundered for materials to fortify the Acropolis. In the 7th century, a new wall was built, right through the bath and basilica, dividing the Acropolis. The remaining artisans moved to houses and workshops built in the unused cisterns of the upper city. In the 8th century, the last inhabitants probably abandoned the city and moved to nearby Chrysopolis (formerly Eion, once the port of Amphipolis).
RP86717. Bronze AE 17, RPC I 1638 (2 spec.); BMC Macedonia p. 54, 87; SNG ANS -; Varbanov III -; AMNG III -, VF, green patina, corrosion, encrustations, weight 3.358 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, 16 Mar 37 - 24 Jan 41 A.D.; obverse AMΦIΠOΛITΩN, laureate and bearded head of Zeus(?) right; reverse Γ KAICAP ΓEPMAN, Caligula on rearing horse right, raising right hand in salute; ex Numismatik Naumann, auction 56 (6 Aug 2017), lot 310; extremely rare; SOLD


Plotina, Augusta 105 - 129 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

|Amphipolis|, |Plotina,| |Augusta| |105| |-| |129| |A.D.,| |Amphipolis,| |Macedonia||AE| |24|
Plotina was the wife of Trajan, married to him before his succession. She was renowned for her virtue and simplicity. In 100, Trajan awarded her with the title of Augusta, but she did not accept the title until 105. Plotina did not appear on the coinage until 112. She was largely responsible for Hadrian's succession to the throne after Trajan's death. Plotina died in 129 A.D.
SH79967. Bronze AE 24, RPC Online III 645, SNG Evelpidis 1170, Lindgren 980, SNG ANS -, SNG Cop -, BMC Macedonia -, Varbanov -, F, green patina, pitting, weight 9.487 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, 105 - 129 A.D.; obverse CEBACTH ΠΛWTEINA, draped bust right; reverse AMΦIΠOΛTWN, Tyche seated left, patera in right hand; very rare; SOLD


Domitia, Wife of Domitian, 81 - 96 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

|Domitia|, |Domitia,| |Wife| |of| |Domitian,| |81| |-| |96| |A.D.,| |Amphipolis,| |Macedonia||AE| |24|
Domitia Longina was the daughter of the famous general Cnaeus Domitius Corbulo and was taken from her husband and married to Domitian in 70 A.D. In 83 A.D. she was exiled for her affair with the actor Paris. Later Domitian seems to have forgiven her, as ancient sources indicate her as a part of the plot that ended the emperor's life. She died in the reign of Trajan or Antoninus Pius.
RP58742. Bronze AE 24, RPC II 342, AMNG III 78, BMC Macedonia 96 - 97, SNG Cop -, F, weight 11.772 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 45o, Amphipolis mint, 81 - 96 A.D.; obverse ΔOMITIA AYΓOYC CTA, draped bust right; reverse AMΦIΠOΛITΩN, Tyche seated left, turreted, patera in right; SOLD







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REFERENCES

Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (London, 1992 - ).
Gaebler, H. Die antiken Münzen von Makedonia und Paionia, Die antiken Münzen Nord-Griechenlands Vol. III. (Berlin, 1906).
Head, B. V. British Museum Catalogue of Greek Coins, Macedonia, etc. (London, 1879).
Le Rider, G. Le monnayage d’ argent et d’ or de Philippe II frappé en Macédoine de 359 à 294. (Paris 1977).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints. (San Mateo, 1989).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Mathisen, R.W. "Antigonus Gonatas and the Silver Coinages of Macedonia Circa 280-270 B.C." in ANSMN 26 (1981).
Müller, L. Numismatique d’Alexandre le Grand; Appendice les monnaies de Philippe II et III, et Lysimaque. (Copenhagen, 1855-58).
Price, M. J. The Coinage in the name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus. Vol. 1-2. (Zurich - London, 1991).
Prokopov, Ilya. The Tetradrachms of First Macedonian Region. (Sofia, 1994).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Austria, Klagenfurt, Landesmuseum für Kärnten, Sammlung Dreer. Part 3: Thracien-Macedonien-Päonien. (Klagenfurt, 1984).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Volume 2: Macedonia and Thrace. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung, Makedonien - Könige, 10/11 Heft. (Berlin, 2001).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain V, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, Part 3: Macedonia. (London, 1976).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, University of Glasgow, Part 1: Roman Provincial Coins: Spain–Kingdoms of Asia Minor. (Oxford, 2004).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Greece II. The Alpha Bank Collection, Macedonia I: Alexander I - Perseus. (Athens, 2000).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Greece IV, Numismatic Museum, Athens, The Petros Z. Saroglos Collection, Part 1: Macedonia. (Athens, 2005).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Grèce, Collection Réna H. Evelpidis, Part 2: Macédoine - Thessalie - Illyrie - Epire - Corcyre. (Athens, 1975).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Schweiz II. Münzen derAntike. Katalog der Sammlung Jean-Pierre Righetti im Bernischen Historischen Museum. (Bern, 1993).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, USA, The Collection of the American Numismatic Society, Part 7: Macedonia 1 (Cities, Thraco-Macedonian Tribes, Paeonian kings). (New York, 1997).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, USA, The Collection of the American Numismatic Society, Part| 8: Macedonia 2 (Alexander I - Philip II). (New York, 1994).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, USA, Burton Y. Berry Collection, Part 1: Macedonia to Attica. (New York, 1961).
Thompson, M. "The Mints of Lysimachus," in Essays Robinson.
Varbanov, I. Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Volume III: Thrace (from Perinthus to Trajanopolis), Chersonesos Thraciae, Insula Thraciae, Macedonia. (Bourgas, 2007).

Catalog current as of Wednesday, December 6, 2023.
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