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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Italy||View Options:  |  |  | 

Ancient Greek Coins of Italy (Magna Graecia)
Roman Republic and Central Italy, c. 5th - 4th Century B.C., Lot of 40 Small Aes Rude Fragments

|before| |211| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic| |and| |Central| |Italy,| |c.| |5th| |-| |4th| |Century| |B.C.,| |Lot| |of| |40| |Small| |Aes| |Rude| |Fragments||Lot|
In Italy, as with other nations, early trade used a system of barter. Aes rude (Latin: "rough bronze"), used perhaps as early as the early 8th century B.C., was the earliest metal proto-currency in central Italy. In the 5th century B.C., bronze replaced cattle as the primary measure of value in trade. Aes rude are rough lumpy bronze ingots with no marks or design, some are flat and oblong, others are square, while many are irregular and shapeless. The metal is mostly copper with roughly 5% tin. Weight varies considerably with some exceeding twelve pounds and others under an ounce. Many smaller examples are fragments of broken larger specimens. A balance was necessary to measure value for commercial transactions.
LT110940. Bronze Lot, Lot of 40 aes rude fragments, cf. BMCRR I p. 1, Haeberlin pl. 1, Vecchi ICC pl. 1, Thurlow-Vecchi pl. 2, SRCV I 505, average weight c. 14g, no tags or flips, the actual pieces in the photograph, as is, no returns, 40 pieces; $450.00 SALE PRICE $405.00


Iberia and Magna Graecia, c. 420 - 30 B.C., Lot of 15 Ancient Coins

|Multiple| |Coin| |Lots|, |Iberia| |and| |Magna| |Graecia,| |c.| |420| |-| |30| |B.C.,| |Lot| |of| |15| |Ancient| |Coins||Lot|
The following is from Moneta Numismatic Services and (1) Sayles and Lavendar tags and is not verified by FORVM:
1) Menaion, Sicily, mid 3rd-2nd century B.C., AE16, 4.08g, veiled head of Demeter/MENAINWN, crossed torches, IIII below, CNS 7, aF.
2) Bruttium, Italy, 214-211 B.C., 8.06g, head of Zeus, grain behind/eagle standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopia left, Scheu 13, VF.
3) The Bretti, Bruttium, Italy, c. 208-203 B.C., AE24, 12.12g, helmeted head of Ares/Hera advancing right, HN Italy 2003, nVF.
4) The Bretti, Bruttium, Italy, 214-211 B.C., AE17, 3.62, Nike left/Zeus hurling thunderbolt, HN Italy 1943, gF.
5) Syracuse, Sicily, 406-405 B.C., AE12, 1.46g, female head right/octopus, Calciati II p. 38, 9, F, ex Sayles and Lavendar.
6) Obulco, Iberia, 1st century B.C., AE20, 3.90g, laureate head of Apollo right/bull standing right, VF.
7) Leontini, Sicily, 207 - 200 B.C., AE14, 2.44g, wreathed and veiled head of Demeter left/bundle of four grain ears, CNS 9, F.
8) Akragas, Sicily, 240-212 B.C., AE19, 5.58g, Kore wearing grain/Asklepios standing resting on serpent-entwined staff, CNS 144, VF/F.
9) Iberia, hacksilver, 4th-2nd century B.C., 4.29g, equal in weight to an Attic drachm.
10) Iberia, Punic Issues, mid-late 3rd century B.C., AE12, 1.80g, wreathed head of Tanit right/Horse head left, ACIP 590, F.
11) Gadir, Iberia, 2nd century B.C., AE25, 7.95g, head of Herakles left, wearing lion skin headdress/two fish, SNG BM 228, nF.
12) Zeugitana, Carthage, 300-264 B.C., AE20, 5.44g, wreathed head of Tanit left/head of horse right, MAA 57, VF.
13) Paestum, Lucania, 3rd century B.C., AE17, 4.45g, laureate head of Neptune right/dolphin left, F.
14) Kamarina, Sicily, 420-405 B.C., AE10, 1.02g, Gorgoneion/owl standing right, lizard before, Westermark-Jenkins 186, VF.
15) The Mamertini, Messana, Sicily, 211-208 B.C., AE26, 9.97g, Zeus/warrior, CNS 41, nF.
LT96255. Bronze Lot, 15 ancient bronze coins from Iberia and Magna Graecia, c. 420 - 30 B.C.; the actual coins in the photograph, in flips (non-archival) with Moneta Numismatic Services (14) or Sayles & Lavender (1) tag (information not verified by FORVM), tag prices total $925, 15 coins; $400.00 SALE PRICE $360.00


Roman Republic and Central Italy, c. 5th - 4th Century B.C., lot of 15 Aes Rude Fragments

|before| |211| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic| |and| |Central| |Italy,| |c.| |5th| |-| |4th| |Century| |B.C.,| |lot| |of| |15| |Aes| |Rude| |Fragments||Lot|
Aes rude is the earliest type of money used by the population of central Italy. They are just irregular pieces of bronze with no marks or designs. More advanced types of currency were used later: Aes Signatum and Aes Grave, and in the end, normal struck coins.
LT110960. Bronze Lot, Lot of 15 aes rude fragments, average weight c. 32.5g, the actual fragments in the photograph, as-is, no returns; $350.00 SALE PRICE $315.00


Roman Republic and Central Italy, c. 5th - 4th Century B.C., Lot of 7 Aes Rude Fragments

|before| |211| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic| |and| |Central| |Italy,| |c.| |5th| |-| |4th| |Century| |B.C.,| |Lot| |of| |7| |Aes| |Rude| |Fragments||Lot|
In Italy, as with other nations, early trade used a system of barter. Aes rude (Latin: "rough bronze"), used perhaps as early as the early 8th century B.C., was the earliest metal proto-currency in central Italy. In the 5th century B.C., bronze replaced cattle as the primary measure of value in trade. Aes rude are rough lumpy bronze ingots with no marks or design, some are flat and oblong, others are square, while many are irregular and shapeless. The metal is mostly copper with roughly 5% tin. Weight varies considerably with some exceeding twelve pounds and others under an ounce. Many smaller examples are fragments of broken larger specimens. A balance was necessary to measure value for commercial transactions.
LT110961. Bronze Lot, Lot of 7 aes rude fragments, cf. BMCRR I p. 1, Haeberlin pl. 1, Vecchi ICC pl. 1, Thurlow-Vecchi pl. 2, SRCV I 505, weight c. 40 - 241g, no tags or flips, the actual pieces in the photograph; $350.00 SALE PRICE $315.00


Roman Republic and Central Italy, c. 5th - 4th Century B.C., Lot of 20 Aes Rude Fragments

|before| |211| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic| |and| |Central| |Italy,| |c.| |5th| |-| |4th| |Century| |B.C.,| |Lot| |of| |20| |Aes| |Rude| |Fragments||Lot|
In Italy, as with other nations, early trade used a system of barter. Aes rude (Latin: "rough bronze"), used perhaps as early as the early 8th century B.C., was the earliest metal proto-currency in central Italy. In the 5th century B.C., bronze replaced cattle as the primary measure of value in trade. Aes rude are rough lumpy bronze ingots with no marks or design, some are flat and oblong, others are square, while many are irregular and shapeless. The metal is mostly copper with roughly 5% tin. Weight varies considerably with some exceeding twelve pounds and others under an ounce. Many smaller examples are fragments of broken larger specimens. A balance was necessary to measure value for commercial transactions.
LT110964. Bronze Lot, Lot of 20 aes rude fragments, cf. BMCRR I p. 1, Haeberlin pl. 1, Vecchi ICC pl. 1, Thurlow-Vecchi pl. 2, SRCV I 505, weight c. 12 - 119g, no tags or flips, the actual pieces in the photograph, as is, no returns, 20 pieces; $350.00 SALE PRICE $315.00


Roman Republic and Central Italy, c. 5th - 4th Century B.C., Lot of 10 Aes Rude Fragments

|before| |211| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic| |and| |Central| |Italy,| |c.| |5th| |-| |4th| |Century| |B.C.,| |Lot| |of| |10| |Aes| |Rude| |Fragments||Lot|
In Italy, as with other nations, early trade used a system of barter. Aes rude (Latin: "rough bronze"), used perhaps as early as the early 8th century B.C., was the earliest metal proto-currency in central Italy. In the 5th century B.C., bronze replaced cattle as the primary measure of value in trade. Aes rude are rough lumpy bronze ingots with no marks or design, some are flat and oblong, others are square, while many are irregular and shapeless. The metal is mostly copper with roughly 5% tin. Weight varies considerably with some exceeding twelve pounds and others under an ounce. Many smaller examples are fragments of broken larger specimens. A balance was necessary to measure value for commercial transactions.
LT110941. Bronze Lot, Lot of 10 aes rude fragments, cf. BMCRR I p. 1, Haeberlin pl. 1, Vecchi ICC pl. 1, Thurlow-Vecchi pl. 2, SRCV I 505, average weight c. 73g, no tags or flips, the actual pieces in the photograph, as is, no returns, 10 pieces; $325.00 SALE PRICE $293.00


Roman Republic and Central Italy, Cast Aes Rude, c. 5th - 4th Century B.C., 20 Fragments

|before| |211| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic| |and| |Central| |Italy,| |Cast| |Aes| |Rude,| |c.| |5th| |-| |4th| |Century| |B.C.,| |20| |Fragments||Lot|
In Italy, as with other nations, early trade used a system of barter. Aes rude (Latin: "rough bronze"), used perhaps as early as the early 8th century B.C., was the earliest metal proto-currency in central Italy. In the 5th century B.C., bronze replaced cattle as the primary measure of value in trade. Aes rude are rough lumpy bronze ingots with no marks or design, some are flat and oblong, others are square, while many are irregular and shapeless. The metal is mostly copper with roughly 5% tin. Weight varies considerably with some exceeding twelve pounds and others under an ounce. Many smaller examples are fragments of broken larger specimens. A balance was necessary to measure value for commercial transactions.
LT96143. Bronze Lot, Lot of 20 aes rude fragments, cf. BMCRR I p. 1, Haeberlin pl. 1, Vecchi ICC pl. 1, Thurlow-Vecchi pl. 2, SRCV I 505, 13.908g - 65.836g, no tags or flips, actual pieces in the photograph, as-is, no returns; $320.00 SALE PRICE $288.00


Roman Republic, 4th Century B.C., Aes Formatum, Domed Disk Ingot Fragment

|before| |211| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |4th| |Century| |B.C.,| |Aes| |Formatum,| |Domed| |Disk| |Ingot| |Fragment||Aes| |Formatum|
In Italy, as with other nations, early trade used a system of barter. Aes rude (Latin: "rough bronze"), used perhaps as early as the early 8th century B.C., was the earliest metal proto-currency in central Italy. In the 5th century B.C., bronze replaced cattle as the primary measure of value in trade. Called aes formatum by Haeberlin, this very rare bronze currency was later than the aes rude and a precursor to the issues of aes grave. Presumably, the molten bronze alloy was poured into a shallow hole in the dirt. This left a disc-shaped metal mound with a flat reverse. This specimen is a fragment of broken from a disk for a smaller transaction or to make change. A scale was necessary to measure value for commercial transactions.
LT110962. Cast bronze Aes Formatum, cf. Haeberlin p. 4, pl. 2.7; fragment 564g, 86mm, 4th century B.C.; obverse convex obverse; reverse flat reverse; rare; $270.00 SALE PRICE $243.00


Roman Republic and Central Italy, c. 5th - 4th Century B.C. Aes Rude

|before| |211| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic| |and| |Central| |Italy,| |c.| |5th| |-| |4th| |Century| |B.C.| |Aes| |Rude||Aes| |Rude|
In Italy, as with other nations, early trade used a system of barter. Aes rude (Latin: "rough bronze"), used perhaps as early as the early 8th century B.C., was the earliest metal proto-currency in central Italy. In the 5th century B.C., bronze replaced cattle as the primary measure of value in trade. Aes rude are rough lumpy bronze ingots with no marks or design, some are flat and oblong, others are square, while many are irregular and shapeless. The metal is mostly copper with roughly 5% tin. Weight varies considerably with some exceeding twelve pounds and others under an ounce. Many smaller examples are fragments of broken larger specimens. A balance was necessary to measure value for commercial transactions.
LT110965. Bronze Aes Rude, SRCV I 505; Thurlow-Vecchi pl. 2; weight 419.6g, maximum length 91mm, c. 5th - 4th Centuries B.C.; $200.00 SALE PRICE $180.00


Osco-Latin, Central Italy, Cast Aes Formatum, Late 4th - Early 3rd Century B.C., Imitating a Bipod Shell

|Italy|, |Osco-Latin,| |Central| |Italy,| |Cast| |Aes| |Formatum,| |Late| |4th| |-| |Early| |3rd| |Century| |B.C.,| |Imitating| |a| |Bipod| |Shell||Aes| |Formatum|NEW
Similar bronze Aes formatum were simply cast in molds made from seashells. This specimen was cast from a mold made with a shell - but the lines were incised by a human hand.
GI111042. Cast bronze Aes Formatum, cf. Fallai IAPN 8, pl. 6, 2-2c; Alvarez-Burgos P28; Thurlow-Vecchi -, VF, weight 33.8 g, uncertain Osco-Latin mint, late 4th - early 3rd century B.C.; $200.00 SALE PRICE $180.00 ON RESERVE







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REFERENCES|

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