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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Types| ▸ |Chariot||View Options:  |  |  | 

Chariots on Ancient Coins
Seleukid Kingdom, Seleucus I Nikator, 312 - 280 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Seleucus| |I| |Nikator,| |312| |-| |280| |B.C.||tetradrachm|
Seleukos (Seleucus) founded the Seleukid Empire and the Seleukid dynasty which ruled Syria until Pompey made it a Roman province in 63 B.C. Seleukos was never one of Alexander the Great's principal generals but he commanded the royal bodyguard during the Indian campaign. In the division of the empire after Alexander's death Seleukos did not receive a satrapy. Instead, he served under the regent Perdikkas until the latter's murder in 321 or 320. Seleukos was then appointed satrap of Babylonia. Five years later Antigonus Monophthalmus (the One-eyed) forced him to flee, but he returned with support from Ptolemy. He later added Persia and Media to his territory and defeated both Antigonus and Lysimachus. He was succeeded by his son Antiochus I.
GY95974. Silver tetradrachm, cf. Houghton-Lorber I 177; Newell ESM 314; BMC Seleucid p. 3, 33 - 34; HGC 9 18c (R1-R2), aVF, high relief head of Zeus, old cabinet toning, flow lines, porosity, light marks, minor edge flaw on reverse, weight 16.251 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 180o, Susa (Shush, Iran) mint, c. 295 - 280 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Zeus right; reverse Athena driving biga of horned elephants, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on left, ΣEΛEYKOY in exergue, spearhead (control) above right, A(or E or M over Ω?, obscure, control) lower right before elephants; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $1600.00 SALE PRICE $1280.00
 


Kyme, Aiolis, 2nd Century B.C.

|Aeolis|, |Kyme,| |Aiolis,| |2nd| |Century| |B.C.||AE| |16|
The types on this coin are unusual. In a recent auction, Nomos AG noted the male figure in the chariot is not only wearing military garb but on some specimens also appears to have a laurel wreath on his head (not visible on this coin). If he is laureate, he could be a Roman emperor, which would date this type to the 1st or early 2nd century A.D. We agree, the long accepted Hellenistic date for this type could be wrong.
GB96107. Bronze AE 16, SNG Cop 113; SNGvA 1644; SNG Munchen 512; BMC Troas p. 113, 96, aVF, slightly rough, die damage reverse center, obverse off center, weight 3.797 g, maximum diameter 16.4 mm, die axis 0o, Kyme (near Nemrut Limani, Turkey) mint, 2nd century B.C.; obverse Artemis standing right, long torch in left hand, quiver and bow on back, clasping right hands with Amazon Kyme, Kyme standing left, transverse scepter in left hand, K-Y flanking the figures; reverse two figures in a slow quadriga right, draped female (Kyme?) in front holding reins, male behind, wearing military dress, holding a long transverse spear; $50.00 SALE PRICE $45.00
 


Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D.

|Titus|, |Titus,| |24| |June| |79| |-| |13| |September| |81| |A.D.||denarius|
Certificate of Authenticity issued by David R. Sear. 

"The quadriga with the basket of grain-ears shows the procession of the calathus of Ceres, sung by Callimachus in his hymn [to Demeter]: it had already appeared on the coins of the moneyers of Augustus in 17 B.C. (cf. BMC 38). It is unmistakably derived form Alexandria, and suggests the importance of Egypt as the granary of Rome, even beside any endeavors of the Emperor to revive Italian agriculture." -- Mattingly, p. xlii of BMCRE Vol. 2
SH13367. Silver denarius, RIC II-1 Vespasian, 1073 (C); BnF III Vespasian 226; BMCRE II Vespasian 256; RSC II 336; SRCV I 2450, nice VF, nicely toned, weight 3.222 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, as caesar, Jan - Jun 79 A.D.; obverse T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS (counter-clockwise), laureate head right; reverse TR P VIII COS VII, slow quadriga right without driver, garland on side, basket of grain displayed on top; scarce; SOLD







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