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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Non-Olympian| ▸ |Helios||View Options:  |  |  | 

Helios

Helios was imagined as a handsome Sun god crowned with the shining aureole of the sun, who drove the chariot of the sun across the sky each day to earth-circling Oceanus and through the world-ocean returned to the East at night. Helios is sometimes identified with Apollo. Greek poets never described Apollo driving the chariot of the sun, but it was common practice for Latin poets. Worship of Helios (and later Sol) was sometimes considered a cult in conflict with traditional worship.

Tripolis, Lydia, c. 138 - 192 A.D.

|Other| |Lydia|, |Tripolis,| |Lydia,| |c.| |138| |-| |192| |A.D.||AE| |17|
Tripolis on the Meander (Tripolis ad Maeandrum, also Neapolis, Apollonia, and Antoninopolis) was on the borders of Phrygia, Caria and Lydia, on the northern bank of the upper course of the Maeander, and on the road leading from Sardes by Philadelphia to Laodicea ad Lycum. It was 20 km to the northwest of Hierapolis. The earliest mention of Tripolis is by Pliny, who treats it as Lydian. Ptolemy and Stephanus of Byzantium describe it as Carian. Hierocles likewise calls it Lydian. Some modern academics have placed it in Phrygia. The ruins of Tripolis ad Maeandrum mostly date from the Roman and Byzantine periods and include a theater, baths, city walls, and a necropolis. An ancient church, dating back 1,500 years, was unearthed in 2013.
RP111208. Bronze AE 17, RPC Online IV.2 T1634 (3 spec.), GRPC Lydia 4 Tripolis 55, Winterthur 3984, Mionnet Suppl. VI (Caria) 562, gF, well centered, broad flan, nice style, green patina, marks, edge splits/cracks, weight 2.918 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 0o, Lydia, Tripolis (near Yenicekent, Turkey) mint, c. 138 - 192 A.D.; obverse radiate-headed and draped bust of Helios right; reverse TPIΠOΛEITΩN, Nike walking right, raising wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand over left shoulder; from the Michael Arslan Collection, Coin Archives records only one specimen of the type at auction in the last two decades; very rare; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00







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Catalog current as of Tuesday, May 30, 2023.
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