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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Hellenistic Monarchies| ▸ |Judean Kingdom||View Options:  |  |  |   

Judean Kingdom

Coins of Judaea and Palestine are also presented in our Judean and Biblical catalog section. Here coins of the Judaea Kingdom are grouped together and listed from highest price to lowest. In our Judean and Biblical catalog section coins are organized by types and rulers and are presented with additional historical information and biblical references.

Judean Kingdom, Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 103 - 76 B.C.

|Alexander| |Jannaeus|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |Jannaeus| |(Yehonatan),| |103| |-| |76| |B.C.||lepton|
Unpopular, Jannaeus was pelted with citrons on Sukkot. Enraged, he killed some 6,000 citizens. A revolt erupted and rebels called on the Seleucid King Demetrius III for aid. Demetrius forced him into the mountains but then withdrew. Back in power, Jannaeus crucified 800 rebels forcing them to watch the slaughter of their wives and children from their crosses.
JD98781. Bronze lepton, Hendin 6183 (RR); BMC Palestine p. 199, 9; Meshorer TJC O; Sofaer 220; Meshorer AJC B; HGC 10 643; SNG ANS -, F, earthen deposits, remnant of a pre-strike casting sprue, weight 1.293 g, maximum diameter 13.7 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, 103 - 76 B.C.; obverse Paleo-Hebrew legend counterclockwise from upper left: (Yehonatan the King), palm branch upright; reverse lily; from an Israeli collection, first specimen of this type handled by FORVM; very rare; $1250.00 SALE PRICE $1125.00


Judean Kingdom, Herod the Great, 37 - 4 B.C.

|Herod| |the| |Great|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Herod| |the| |Great,| |37| |-| |4| |B.C.||eight| |prutot|
Matthew (2:1-23) describes the Massacre of the Innocents. Wise men from the East visited Herod to inquire the whereabouts of "the one having been born king of the Jews," because they had seen his star. Herod, as King of the Jews, was alarmed. The chief priests, citing Micah 5:2, told Herod the anointed one would be born in Bethlehem. Herod sent the "wise men" to Bethlehem, instructing them to "report to me, so that I too may go and worship him." However, the Magi were warned in a dream not to report back to Herod. Joseph was warned in a dream that Herod intended to kill Jesus, so he and his family fled to Egypt. When Herod realized he had been outwitted, he gave orders to kill all boys of the age of two and under in Bethlehem and its vicinity. Joseph and his family stayed in Egypt until Herod's death, then moved to Nazareth. Herod was guilty of many brutal acts, including killing his wife and two sons, but no other source from the period refers to the massacre. Bethlehem was a small village, the number of male children under the age of two might not have exceed 20, and this may be the reason for the lack of other sources for this history.
JD111099. Copper eight prutot, Hendin 6204; Meshorer TJC 44; Meshorer AJC II 1; BMC Palestine p. 220, 1; RPC I 4901 HGC 10 651, F, off center, weight 6.129 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 0o, Samaria mint, 40/39 or 38/37 B.C.; obverse HPΩΔOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (Greek: of King Herod), tripod, ceremonial bowl (lebes) above, LΓ - P (year 3 of the tetrarchy = 40 B.C.) across fields; reverse military helmet facing, with cheek pieces and straps, wreathed with acanthus leaves, star above, flanked by two palm-branches; scarce; $225.00 SALE PRICE $203.00


Judean Kingdom, Herod the Great, 37 - 4 B.C.

|Herod| |the| |Great|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Herod| |the| |Great,| |37| |-| |4| |B.C.||2| |prutot|
Meshorer TJC 48 and 48a are described with an open diadem but the plate coins have closed diadems. The diadems on Meshorer 49 are open. This coin appears to have an open diadem.
JD111337. Bronze 2 prutot, Meshorer TJC p. 222 & pl. 44, 49; Sofaer 19; Hendin 6211a (S); HGC 10 654; RPC I 4905; BMC Palestine p. 223, 28 ff., VF, well centered with full legend, dark patina, highlighting earthen deposits, weight 2.911 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 315o, Jerusalem mint, c. 30 B.C.; obverse HPΩΔOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (Greek: of King Herod), cross surrounded by a open diadem; reverse shallow bowl on a tripod table, flanked by curved palm branches; scarce; $225.00 SALE PRICE $203.00


Herod Archelaus, Ethnarch of Samaria, Judea, and Idumea, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.

|Herod| |Archelaus|, |Herod| |Archelaus,| |Ethnarch| |of| |Samaria,| |Judea,| |and| |Idumea,| |4| |B.C.| |-| |6| |A.D.||prutah|
Herod's most famous and ambitious project was his magnificent expansion of the Second Temple in Jerusalem in 20 - 19 B.C. Although work on out-buildings continued another eighty years, the new Temple was finished in a year and a half. To comply with religious law, Herod employed 1,000 priests as masons and carpenters. The temple was destroyed in 70 A.D. Today, only the four retaining walls of the Temple Mount remain standing, including the Western Wall.
JD98786. Bronze prutah, cf. Meshorer TJC 68f, Hendin 6223 (S), RPC Online I 4912, Sofaer 62 (cruder than published specimens), VF, crude style, dark patina, highlighting earthen deposits, tight flan, uneven strike, remnant of pre-strike casting sprue, weight 0.844 g, maximum diameter 13.9 mm, die axis 135o, Jerusalem mint, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.; obverse HPΩΔ (or similar, Greek abbreviation: of King Herod), anchor; reverse two cornucopias splayed outward, adorned with ribbons, caduceus between horns, N(?) (blundered Greek, abbreviating Ethnarch) above; from an Israeli collection; rare crude variant; $220.00 SALE PRICE $198.00


Herodian Kings of Judaea, c. 37 B.C. - 44 A.D., Lot of 6 Prutot

|Holyland| |Bulk| |Lots|, |Herodian| |Kings| |of| |Judaea,| |c.| |37| |B.C.| |-| |44| |A.D.,| |Lot| |of| |6| |Prutot
||Lot|
Prutot (singular: prutah) of Herod the Great and his son(s)
LT98836. Bronze Lot, Lot of 6 prutot, F - gF, Jerusalem mint, c. 37 B.C. - 44 A.D.; coins of Herod the Great and his son(s), unattributed, no tags or flips, the actual coins in the photographs, 6 prutot; some scarce; $200.00 SALE PRICE $180.00


Judean Kingdom, Herod the Great, 37 - 4 B.C., Barbaric Imitative Issue

|Herod| |the| |Great|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Herod| |the| |Great,| |37| |-| |4| |B.C.,| |Barbaric| |Imitative| |Issue||prutah|
Herod's most famous and ambitious project was his magnificent expansion of the Second Temple in Jerusalem in 20 - 19 B.C. Although work on out-buildings continued another eighty years, the new Temple was finished in a year and a half. To comply with religious law, Herod employed 1,000 priests as masons and carpenters. The temple was destroyed in 70 A.D. Today, only the four retaining walls of the Temple Mount remain standing, including the Western Wall.
JD111347. Leaded bronze prutah, Hendin 6219e, VF, barbaric issue, weight 1.553 g, maximum diameter 15.1 mm, die axis 180o, unofficial mint, c. 21 - 12 B.C.; obverse blundered imitation of Greek: HPW BACI (of King Herod), anchor; reverse two cornucopias splayed outward, adorned with ribbons, caduceus between horns (blundered, failing to understand the items depicted); rare; $200.00 SALE PRICE $180.00


Herod Archelaus, Ethnarch of Samaria, Judea, and Idumea, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.

|Herod| |Archelaus|, |Herod| |Archelaus,| |Ethnarch| |of| |Samaria,| |Judea,| |and| |Idumea,| |4| |B.C.| |-| |6| |A.D.||prutah|
Grapes, the vine and wine were an important part of the ancient economy and ritual. Grapes were brought to the Temple as offerings of the first-fruits and wine was offered upon the altar. The vine and grapes decorated the sacred vessels in the sanctuary and a golden vine with clusters of grapes stood at its entrance.
JD110301. Bronze prutah, Hendin 6227; Meshorer TJC 73; BMC Palestine p. 232, 10; SGICV 5539; RPC I 4917, VF, well centered, green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, prominent sprue cuts, reverse edge beveled, weight 2.272 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 315o, Jerusalem mint, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.; obverse HPΩΔOY (Greek: of Herod), bunch of grapes, leaf on left; reverse EΘNOPXOY (Greek: Ethnarch), tall helmet with crest and neck straps viewed from the front, small caduceus in lower left field; from an Israeli collection; $180.00 SALE PRICE $162.00


Herodian Kings of Judaea, c. 37 B.C. - 44 A.D., Lot of 6 Prutot

|Holyland| |Bulk| |Lots|, |Herodian| |Kings| |of| |Judaea,| |c.| |37| |B.C.| |-| |44| |A.D.,| |Lot| |of| |6| |Prutot
||Lot|
Prutot (singular: prutah) of Herod the Great and his son(s)
LT98834. Bronze Lot, Lot of 6 prutot, aF or better, Jerusalem mint, c. 37 B.C. - 44 A.D.; coins of Herod the Great and his son(s), unattributed, no tags or flips, the actual coins in the photographs, 6 prutot; some scarce; $160.00 SALE PRICE $144.00


Judean Kingdom, Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 104 - 76 B.C., Plate Coin

|Alexander| |Jannaeus|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |Jannaeus| |(Yehonatan),| |104| |-| |76| |B.C.,| |Plate| |Coin||tessera|
Lead tesserae (tokens) were likely issued by the monarch to the poor to be redeemed for food or other commodities. Meshorer reports the lead tesserae of Alexander Jannaeus are found almost exclusively in Transjordan. This is the plate coin in Meshorer's Jewish Coins of the Second Temple Period (Tel-Aviv, 1967), at which time the coin was in the Grosswirth Collection.
JD111754. Lead tessera, Meshorer 2nd Temple pl. II, 7 (this coin), Hendin 6192 (S), Meshorer TJC M, Meshorer AJC D, HGC 10 645, gF, green-gray surfaces, earthen deposits, cleaning scratches, weight 4.019 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, Transjordan mint, 95 - 76 B.C.; obverse Greek legend: BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞANΔPOY (of King Alexander), anchor (upside-down as if hanging on the side of a boat), inside circle; reverse traces of Aramaic inscription, King Alexander, in three lines, within a border of dots; ex CNG e-auction 510 (23 Feb 2022), lot 283; ex Dr. Jay M. Galst Collection; Herb Kreindler (May 1985); ex E. Grosswirth Collection ; very scarce; $160.00 SALE PRICE $144.00


Judean Kingdom, Judah Aristobulus I (Yehudah), 104 - 103 B.C.

|Judah| |Aristobulus| |I|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Judah| |Aristobulus| |I| |(Yehudah),| |104| |-| |103| |B.C.||prutah|
The Paleo-Hebrew inscription on this coin reads, from right to left, as follows: The Paleo-Hebrew inscription reads, from right to left, as follows: YHWD/H (Judah) KHN (priest) GD/WL (high) W (and) (HH)BR (council) / H (the) YHWD/MY (Jews). See Reading Judean Coins in NumisWiki.
JD111140. Bronze prutah, Hendin 6179, Meshorer TJC U, Meshorer AJC J, HGC 10 634, VF, choice obv., dark patina with highlighting earthen deposits, rev. off center, reverse edge beveled, sprue cuts on edge, weight 1.979 g, maximum diameter 14.9 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, 104 - 103 B.C.; obverse Hebrew inscription, Yehudah the High Priest and the Council of the Jews, surrounded by wreath; reverse two cornucopias splayed outward, adorned with ribbons, pomegranate or poppy between the horns; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00




  



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REFERENCES

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