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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Types ▸ Orbs or GlobesView Options:  |  |  |   

Orbs and Globes on Ancient Coins

Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

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The Temple of Antoninus and Faustina is an ancient Roman temple in Rome, adapted as a Roman Catholic church, Chiesa di San Lorenzo in Miranda. It is in the Forum Romanum, on the Via Sacra, opposite the Regia. The temple was begun by Antoninus Pius in 141 and was initially dedicated to his deceased and deified wife, Faustina the Elder. When Antoninus Pius was deified after his death in 161 AD, the temple was re-dedicated jointly to Antoninus and Faustina at the instigation of his successor, Marcus Aurelius. The ten monolithic Corinthian columns of its pronaos are 17 metres high. The rich bas-reliefs of the frieze under the cornice, of garlanded griffons and candelabri, were often copied from the sixteenth through the nineteenth centuries. San Lorenzo in Miranda
RB87194. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 746a, Cohen II 464, Hunter II 211, BMCRE IV 1641, SRCV II 4185, VF, well centered, excellent portrait, attractive reverse style, turning marks, light corrosion, porous, weight 25.180 g, maximum diameter 34.07 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 140 - 144 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, laureate head right; reverse Italia seated left on celestial globe, wearing turreted crown, holding cornucopia before her in right hand, short scepter in left hand and cradled in left arm, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field, ITALIA in exergue; $600.00 (510.00)


Byzantine Empire, Andronicus I, September 1183 - 12 September 1185 A.D.

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Marchev and Watcher suggest the scarcity of this type my be due to limited or no minting during the Norman siege of Thessalonica.
BZ82686. Bronze half tetarteron, DOC IV, part 1, 8; SBCV 1989; Hendy pl. 19, 4; Morrisson BnF - (p. 731); Wroth BMC 17-18; Ratto 2172; Sommer 62.6; CLBC I 5.4.4; Grierson 1115, F, green patina, broad irregular flan, flan splits, some minor corrosion, weight 2.700 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, Sep 1183 - 12 Sep 1185 A.D.; obverse facing bust of the Virgin Orans, nimbate and wearing pallium and maphorium, the nimbate head of the infant Christ on her chest, MP - ΘV (Greek abbreviation: Mητηρ Θεου - Mother of God) across field; reverse A-N, half-length figure of Andronicus facing with forked beard, wearing crown scaramangion and sagion, labarum in left hand, globus cruciger in right hand; rare; $225.00 (191.25)


Jovian, 27 June 363 - 17 February 364 A.D.

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The labarum, was a type of Roman cavalry standard, a vexillum with a military ensign marked with the Christogram (Greek monogram of Christ). It was an object of religious veneration amongst the soldiers, who paid it divine honors.
RL87195. Bronze double maiorina, RIC VIII Thessalonica 236 (R), SRCV V 19213, Cohen VIII 23, LRBC II 1700 var. (rosette diademed), Hunter V -, Choice VF, green patina, well centered, edge crack, weight 9.163 g, maximum diameter 30.2 mm, die axis 150o, 1st officina, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, 27 Jun 363 - 17 Feb 364 A.D.; obverse D N IOVIANVS P F P P AVG (Our lord Jovianus, dutiful, fortunate, father of the coutntry, emperor), pearl diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIA ROMANORVM (to Roman victory), Jovian standing facing, head right, labarum (Chi-Rho Christogram Standard) in right hand, Victory on globe in left hand offering him and Chi-Rho standard, TESA in exergue; rare with pearl diadem; $220.00 (187.00)


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

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Two days before his death, Antoninus was at his ancestral estate at Lorium, in Etruria, about twelve miles (19 km) from Rome. He ate Alpine cheese at dinner quite greedily. In the night he vomited; he had a fever the next day. The day after that, 7 March 161, he summoned the imperial council, and passed the state and his daughter to Marcus. The emperor gave the keynote to his life in the last word that he uttered when the tribune of the night-watch came to ask the password - "aequanimitas" (equanimity). He then turned over, as if going to sleep, and died. His death closed out the longest reign since Augustus (surpassing Tiberius by a couple of months).
RS85783. Silver denarius, RIC III MA433; MIR 18 25-4/10; RSC II 158; BMCRE IV p. 393, 45; Hunter II 8 var. (slight drapery); SRCV II 5191, Choice VF, well centered, nice portrait, toned, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.263 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, posthumous, 161 A.D.; obverse DIVVS ANTONINVS, bare head right; reverse CONSECRATIO, eagle standing half-right on globe, wings spread, looking left; $135.00 (114.75)


Crispus, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 326 A.D.

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On 7 March 321, Constantine issued an edict proclaiming Dies Solis Invicti (Sunday) as the day of rest; trade was forbidden but agriculture was allowed.
RL77188. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Lyons 133, Hunter V 25, SRCV IV 16734, Bastien XIII 102, Cohen VII 6, Choice EF, dark toning on silvering, weight 3.120 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 321 A.D.; obverse CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse BEATA TRANQVILLITAS (blessed tranquility), altar inscribed VO/TIS / XX in three lines, surmounted by globe, three stars above, C left, R right, PLG crescent in exergue; $125.00 (106.25)


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Parium, Mysia

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Founded in 709 B.C., the ancient city of Parion was a major coastal city, near Lampsacus, with two harbors used to connect Thrace with Anatolia. Parium belonged to the Delian League. In the Hellenistic period, it came under the domain of Lysimachus, and subsequently the Attalid dynasty. Julius Caesar refounded it as a colonia in the province of Asia. It was the main customs station through which all goods bound for Byzantium from Greece and the Aegean had to pass. When this coin was minted, Parium was within the Conventus of Adramyteum. After Asia was divided in the 4th century, Parium was in the province of Hellespontus. Today it is the village of Kemer in the township of Biga, Canakkale province, Turkey.
RP85229. Bronze AE 23, SNG anakkale 220 corr. (obv. legend), SNG BnF 1494 var. (same), SNG Cop 296 var. (same), BMC Mysia -, SNGvA -, SNG Tb -, SNG Hunt -, Lindgren -, VF, well centered and struck, bumps and scratches, centration dimples, weight 5.450 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 225o, Parium (Kemer, Canakkale, Turkey) mint, c. 178 - 180, probably 180; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS FEL A, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, beardless, from behind; reverse Capricorn swimming right, holding celestial globe between hooves, cornucopia on back, C G I H P (Colonia Gemella Iulia Hadriana Pariana) below; very rare; $125.00 (106.25)


Philip II, July or August 247 - Late 249 A.D.

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When Augustus ruled Rome, he was not called emperor or king, he was the Princeps, the "first of men." In the empire, the designated successors to the emperor were named caesar and also given the title Princeps Juventutis, the "first of youths." This is the origin of the English word prince, meaning the son of a monarch.
RS86827. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 218d, RSC IV 48, Hunter V 8, SRCV III 9240, EF, excellent portrait, detailed reverse, well centered and struck on a broad oval flan, light tone, flan crack, weight 3.598 g, maximum diameter 23.5 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 244 - 246 A.D.; obverse M IVL PHILIPPVS CAES, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse PRINCIPI IVVENT (to the Prince of Youth), Philip II standing slightly left, head left, wearing military dress, globe in extended right hand, inverted spear in left hand; ex Beast Coins; $125.00 (106.25)


Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

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Constantine II was about eight years old when this coin was minted. Here he is draped and cuirassed as a powerful child Caesar with the world in his hands!
RL12133. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Trier 382 (R3) corr. (no cuirass), SRCV V 17157 var. (bust), Cohen VII 23, aEF, superb bust type, broad flan, slightly uneven strike, reverse legend weak, weight 3.018 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 315o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 323 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust left, Victory on globe offering wreath in right hand, mappa in left, head of Medusa on cuirass; reverse BEATA TRANQVILLITAS (blessed tranquility), altar inscribed VO/TIS / XX, surmounted by globe, three stars above, STR crescent in exergue; rare; $120.00 (102.00)


Crispus, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 326 A.D.

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In 323, Constantine the Great defeated invading Goths and Sarmatians north of the Danube in Dacia, and claimed the title Sarmaticus Maximus.
RL74542. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Trier 372, SRCV IV 16731, Cohen VII 22; very rare shield decoration, aF, corrosion, patina flaking, weight 16.330 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 322 - 323 A.D.; obverse IVL CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate and cuirassed bust left, spear over shoulder in right, shield on left shoulder ornamented with Victory inscribing shield; reverse BEATA TRAN-QVILLITAS, altar inscribed VO/TIS / XX in three lines, surmounted by globe, three stars above, ?PTR? in exergue; $110.00 (93.50)


Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

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In a religious context, votum, plural vota, is a vow or promise made to a deity. The word comes from the past participle of voveo, vovere; as the result of the verbal action "vow, promise", it may refer also to the fulfillment of this vow, that is, the thing promised. The votum is thus an aspect of the contractual nature of Roman religion, a bargaining expressed by do ut des, "I give that you might give."
RL76939. Billon reduced follis, RIC VII London 236, Cohen VII 8, SRCV V 17149 var. (helmeted bust), Hunter V -, Nice gVF, weight 3.109 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, Londinium (London, England) mint, as caesar, 321 - 322 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS IVN N C, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust left; reverse BEATA TRANQVILLITAS (blessed tranquility), globe on altar inscribed VOT/IS / XX in three lines, three stars above, PLON in exergue; $110.00 (93.50)




  



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Catalog current as of Thursday, September 20, 2018.
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Orbs & Globes