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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Non-Olympian||View Options:  |  |  |   

Gods (Non-Olymian)
Persian Empire, Samaria, c. 375 - 332 B.C.

|Persian| |Rule|, |Persian| |Empire,| |Samaria,| |c.| |375| |-| |332| |B.C.||drachm|NEW
Samaria was the capital of the northern Kingdom of Israel in the 9th - 8th centuries B.C. The Assyrians took the city and the northern kingdom in 722/721 B.C. The city did not recover until the Persian period, the mid 5th century. The tensions between the ruling Sanballat family and Jerusalem under the governorship of Nehemiah are documented in the Bible (Ezra 4:10, Neh 4:78). Samaria became Hellenistic in 332 B.C. Thousands of Macedonian soldiers were settled there following a revolt. The Judaean king John Hyrcanus destroyed Samaria in 108 B.C., but it was resettled under Alexander Jannaeus. In 63 B.C., Samaria was annexed to the Roman province of Syria. Herod the Great fortified the city and renamed it Sebaste. The ruins are located in the Samaria mountains almost 10 km to the northwest of Nablus.
JD99500. Silver drachm, Meshorer-Qedar 30; Samuels 6; Mildenberg Bes pl. 1, 5; Sofaer -; SNG ANS -; Hendin -; HGC 10 -, VF, centered, toned, edge split, a little rough, weight 2.565 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, Samaria (Sebastia, West Bank) mint, c. 375 - 332 B.C.; obverse horned head of creature facing (griffin?) within square guilloche-pattern border; reverse winged and horned griffin recumbent right, Aramaic dalat (for Delayah?) above left, square guilloche-pattern border, all within an incuse square; extremely rare; $4750.00 SALE PRICE $4275.00


Seleukid Kingdom, Demetrius III, c. 96 - 87 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Demetrius| |III,| |c.| |96| |-| |87| |B.C.||tetradrachm|
The inscription on the reverse of this coin translates, "King Demetrios, the god, father-loving, savior." He was nicknamed Eucaerus ("the Timely") by the Syrian Greeks but was called Acaerus ("the Untimely) by the Jews. He defeated the Hasmonaean priest king Alexander Jannaeus but was forced to withdraw from Judaea by the hostile population. While attempting to dethrone his brother, Philip I Philadelphus, he was defeated by the Arabs and Parthians, and taken prisoner. He was held in confinement in Parthia by Mithridates II until his death in 88 B.C.
SL94920. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber 2450(2); HGC 9 1305; cf. BMC Seleucid p. 101, 1 (SE 217, same controls); SNG Spaer 2863 (SE 219, different controls), NGC Ch XF, strike 5/5, surface 3/5 (5771210-005), weight 16.501 g, maximum diameter 30.10 mm, die axis 0o, Damaskos (Damascus, Syria) mint, 97 - 96 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Demetrios III right, fringe of curly beard at jawline, fillet border; reverse BAΣIΛEΩS / DHMHTPIOY / ΘEOY - ΦIΛOΠATOPOΣ / ΣΩTHPOΣ, cult image of Atargatis standing facing, holding flower, barley stalk behind each shoulder, two monograms (controls) outer left, date CIS (Seleucid Era year 216) in exergue, ∆H monogram (control) in exergue on right, laurel wreath border; from the Ray Nouri Collection, NGC| Lookup; scarce; $800.00 SALE PRICE $720.00


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D., Irenopolis-Neronias, Cilicia

|Cilicia|, |Gallienus,| |August| |253| |-| |September| |268| |A.D.,| |Irenopolis-Neronias,| |Cilicia||7| |assaria|
Wandering the world in a panther-drawn chariot, Dionysos rode ahead of the maenads and satyrs, who sang loudly and danced, flushed with wine. They were profusely garlanded with ivy and held the thyrsus, a staff topped with a pine cone, a symbol of the immortality of his believers. Everywhere he went he taught men how to cultivate vines and the mysteries of his cult. Whoever stood in his way and refused to revere him was punished with madness.
RP96990. Bronze 7 assaria, Karbach Eirenopolis - (cf. 146-7 same obv. die, diff. rev. type); Leu web auction 12 (2020), 870 (same dies); SNG Levante -; SNG Paris -; SNG PFPS -, aVF/F, green patina with earthen deposits, weight 12.523 g, maximum diameter 27.7 mm, die axis 225o, Irenopolis (Dzici, Turkey) mint, 258 - 259 A.D.; obverse ΠOY ΛIK Γ/θ>AΛIHNOC, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; uncertain round countermark; reverse IPHNOΠOΛE (or similar), Dionysos drinking with his entourage, standing facing, kantharos (wine cup) in his right hand, pedum (shepherd's crook) in his left hand, Pan on right supporting him, Satyr on left standing with outstretched right hand, panther seated left at feet on left, Z (mark of value) right; ex Leu Numismatik web auction 13 (15 Aug 2020), lot 921; the second known; $720.00 SALE PRICE $648.00


The Temple Tax Coin, Tyre KP Type Half Shekel, Jerusalem or Tyre Mint, 18 - 69 A.D.

|The| |Temple| |Tax| |Coin|, |The| |Temple| |Tax| |Coin,| |Tyre| |KP| |Type| |Half| |Shekel,| |Jerusalem| |or| |Tyre| |Mint,| |18| |-| |69| |A.D.||half| |shekel|
Half Shekel - the currency of the Jerusalem Temple. Under Rome, the silver coinage of Tyre was debased. Some experts believe that, to provide coins with the silver purity required for the temple tax, Herod the Great received permission from Augustus to strike "Tyre" shekels in Jerusalem. The shekels that date from PH (18/17 B.C.) to PKE (69 A.D.) have cruder style and fabric, and the letters KP or KAP (for KAICAP, Greek for Caesar) to the right of the eagle. Wherever they were struck, these later shekels seem to have been struck specifically for the Temple tax. Typical of some shekels struck after 40 A.D., this specimen has a blundered legend and obscure date, due at least in part to extremely worn and perhaps repeatedly re-engraved dies.
JD99227. Silver half shekel, cf. HGC 10 358; Cohen DCA 922; RPC I 4686 ff., Prieur 1442 ff.; BMC Phoenicia p. 252, 235 ff.; Rouvier 2104 ff., VF, debased style, dark toning, light marks, irregular flan shape, edge split, weight 6.943 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre or Jerusalem mint, c. 40 - 69 A.D.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle standing left, head left, wings closed, right talon on war galley ram, palm frond transverse right behind, obscure year over club left, KP over monogram right, Aramaic letter between legs; $600.00 SALE PRICE $540.00


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D., Tyre, Phoenicia

|Phoenicia|, |Valerian| |I,| |October| |253| |-| |c.| |June| |260| |A.D.,| |Tyre,| |Phoenicia||dichalkon|
Romans refounded Tyre as a colony in 64 B.C., when Pompey annexed Phoenicia to the Roman Empire. Tyre flourished under the Rome and remained a Roman port city, even under the Byzantine Empire, until the 7th century when it was taken by Muslim conquest.
RP96396. Bronze dichalkon, BMC Phoenicia p. 289, 465 var. (murex shell on right); Rouvier -; Baramki AUB -; SNG Hunt -; SNG Cop -, F, rough dark green patina, earthen deposits, weight 16.345 g, maximum diameter 27.5 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre (Lebanon) mint, Oct 253 - Jun 260 A.D.; obverse IMP C P LIC VALERIANVS AVG, laureate bust right; reverse COL TVRO METR, river-god (Adonis?) standing facing, head left, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, right hand dropping incense on flaming altar at her feet on left, long grounded reed vertical in left hand, murex shell on left; from the J. Berlin Caesarea Collection, 1971 Caesarea Maritima surface find; Coin Archives records only one specimen of the type at auction in the last two decades; extremely rare; $400.00 SALE PRICE $360.00


Persian Empire, Samaria, c. 375 - 332 B.C.

|Persian| |Rule|, |Persian| |Empire,| |Samaria,| |c.| |375| |-| |332| |B.C.||hemiobol|
Samaria was the capital of the northern Kingdom of Israel in the 9th - 8th centuries B.C. The Assyrians took the city and the northern kingdom in 722/721 B.C. The city did not recover until the Persian period, the mid 5th century. The tensions between the ruling Sanballat family and Jerusalem under the governorship of Nehemiah are documented in the Bible (Ezra 4:10, Neh 4:78). Samaria became Hellenistic in 332 B.C. Thousands of Macedonian soldiers were settled there following a revolt. The Judaean king John Hyrcanus destroyed Samaria in 108 B.C., but it was resettled under Alexander Jannaeus. In 63 B.C., Samaria was annexed to the Roman province of Syria. Herod the Great fortified the city and renamed it Sebaste. The ruins are located in the Samaria mountains almost 10 km to the northwest of Nablus.
JD97789. Silver hemiobol, Meshorer-Qedar 152, Sofaer -, Samaria Hoard -, Hendin -, SNG ANS -, HGC 10 -, aVF, dark toning in fields, scratches, obverse off center, weight 0.396 g, maximum diameter 7.5 mm, die axis 0o, Samaria (Sebastia, West Bank) mint, c. 375 - 332 B.C.; obverse Phoenician galley left, with partially furled sails over zigzag waves; reverse head of Bes facing, within a shaped incuse; very rare; $320.00 SALE PRICE $288.00


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D., Stobi, Macedonia, The Rape of Persephone

|Stobi|, |Julia| |Domna,| |Augusta| |194| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Stobi,| |Macedonia,| |The| |Rape| |of| |Persephone||AE| |25|
Beautiful Persephone lived a peaceful life far away from the other deities, a goddess within Nature herself before the days of planting seeds and nurturing plants. She was innocently picking flowers when Hades, god of the Underworld, burst through a cleft in the earth and abducted her. While Demeter searched desperately for her daughter she neglected the earth and caused nothing to grow. Zeus, pressed by the cries of hungry people, determined to force Hades to return Persephone. However, Hades had tricked Persephone into eating pomegranate seeds, and because anyone who consumes food or drink in the Underworld is doomed to spend eternity there, she is forced return to the underworld for a period each year. Explaining the seasons, when Demeter and her daughter are reunited, the Earth flourishes with vegetation and color, but for the months each year when Persephone returns to the underworld, the earth becomes barren.
RP97760. Bronze AE 25, Josifovski Stobi 151 ff., Varbanov III 3934 (R6), Mionnet Sup. III 691, AMNG III -, SNG Cop -, BMC Macedonia -, gF, broad flan with full legends, corrosion, scratches, central depressions, weight 7.661 g, maximum diameter 24.7 mm, die axis 0o, Stobi (Gradsko, Macedonia) mint, 194 - 8 Apr 217 A.D.; obverse AVGVSTA IVLIA, draped bust right, hair in horizontal ridges, chignon at back of head; reverse MVNICIPI STOBEN, Hades driving quadriga right, holding the abducted Persephone with his right arm, scepter in his left hand; scarce; $270.00 SALE PRICE $243.00


Judaean Kingdom, Herod Agrippa II, c. 49 - 95 A.D., for Domitian

|Agrippa| |I|, |Judaean| |Kingdom,| |Herod| |Agrippa| |II,| |c.| |49| |-| |95| |A.D.,| |for| |Domitian||full| |unit|
We use the dating provided by RPC Online, which adopts 60/61 A.D. for year 1 of the era used by Agrippa II. This solves a number of issues with previous dating schemes, but adds the oddity of a large number of issues of posthumous coinage for Vespasian and Titus. This coin struck for Titus, for example; dated year 30 using this era is 89/90 A.D. Titus died in 81 B.C.
JD98847. Bronze full unit, Hendin 6328 (RR); RPC Online II 2296; BMC Palestine p. 243, 56; SNG ANS 315; Meshorer TJC 179; Sofaer p. 268 & pl. 218, 260, gF, rough, corrosion, scrapes, uneven strike, edge cracks, weight 12.238 g, maximum diameter 26.3 mm, die axis 0o, Caesarea Paneas (Banias, Golan Heights) mint, 94 - 95 A.D.; obverse AYTOKPA ∆OMITIA KAICAP A ΓEPMANI (Emperor Domitian Caesar Germanicus), laureate head of Titus right; reverse Tyche-Demeter standing slightly left, head left, stalks of barley in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, ETOY - EΛ BA / AΓPI-ΠΠA (year 35, King Agrippa) in two lines divided across the field below center; from an Israeli collection; rare; $270.00 SALE PRICE $243.00


Agrippina Junior, Augusta 50 - March 59 A.D., Phrygia, Aezanis

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Agrippina| |Junior,| |Augusta| |50| |-| |March| |59| |A.D.,| |Phrygia,| |Aezanis||AE| |17|
The frequent association of Agrippina Junior with Persephone may relate to the unusual marriage of Agrippina to her Uncle Claudius, as Persephone had married her uncle Hades. Some coins of her mother Agrippina Senior show Demeter, who was the mother of Persephone.
RP97771. Bronze AE 17, RPC Online I 3103 (8 spec.); BMC Phrygia p. 35, 93; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -, aVF, green patina with highlighting earthen deposits, scratches, porosity, slightly off center, patina flaking, weight 3.368 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 0o, Aezanis (Cavdarhisar, Turkey) mint, 50 - March 59 A.D.; obverse AΓPIΠΠINA ΣEBAΣTHN (clockwise from upper right), diademed bust of Agrippina II right; reverse AIZA-NITON (clockwise from upper right), veiled bust of Persephone right, poppy and two grain ears before her; the first specimen of this type handled by FORVM, only two sales of this type recorded on Coin Archives in the last two decades; rare; $180.00 SALE PRICE $162.00


Rhodos, Carian Islands, c. 205 - 189 B.C.

|Rhodos|, |Rhodos,| |Carian| |Islands,| |c.| |205| |-| |189| |B.C.||hemidrachm|
This is only the 2nd specimen of this type known to FORVM - the other specimen on the Tinia Numismatica website (click the link), is incorrectly referenced and dated as the later plinthophoric type. This may be a pseudo Rhodian type struck in Greece.
GS98446. Silver hemidrachm, Unpublished; cf. BMC Caria p. 255, 281 (same name, plinthophoric drachm); SNG Keckman I 588 (similar, magistrate APIΣAKOΣ), VF, toned, porous, obverse off center, weight 1.068 g, maximum diameter 11.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rhodos (Rhodes, Greece) mint, c. 205 - 189 B.C.; obverse head of Helios facing slightly left, hair floating loosely; reverse rose with bud to right, ΞENOΦANTOΣ (magistrate) above, P-O (Rhodos) across field divided by stem, caduceus (control symbol) left; from the Michael Arslan Collection; extremely rare; $180.00 SALE PRICE $162.00




  







Catalog current as of Thursday, May 19, 2022.
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