Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome To Forum Ancient Coins!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities Welcome To Forum Ancient Coins!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Internet Challenged? We Are Happy To Take Your Order Over The Phone 252-646-1958 or 252-497-2724 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
New & Reduced


Show Empty Categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
My FORVM
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
zoom.asp
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Personifications| ▸ |Roma||View Options:  |  |  | 

Roma on Ancient Coins

Roma was a female deity who personified the city of Rome and more broadly, the Roman state. The earliest certain cult to dea Roma was established at Smyrna in 195 B.C., probably to mark the successful alliance against Antiochus III. In 30/29 B.C., the Koinon of Asia and Bithynia requested permission to honor Augustus as a living god. "Republican" Rome despised the worship of a living man, but an outright refusal might offend their loyal allies. A cautious formula was drawn up, non-Romans could only establish a cult for divus Augustus jointly with dea Roma. In the city of Rome itself, the earliest known state cult to dea Roma was combined with Venus at the Hadrianic Temple of Venus and Roma. This was the largest temple in the city, probably dedicated to inaugurate the reformed festival of Parilia, which was known thereafter as the Romaea after the Eastern festival in Roma's honor. The temple contained the seated, Hellenised image of dea Roma with a Palladium in her right hand to symbolize Rome's eternity.

Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.

|Caracalla|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.||denarius|
Not in RIC. RIC lists this type as an aureus and lists a very similar denarius but Roman holds Victory, not a palladium. A palladium was an image of great antiquity on which the safety of a city was said to depend. The "Palladium" was the wooden statue of Pallas Athena that Odysseus and Diomedes stole from the citadel of Troy and which was later taken to Rome by Aeneas. The Roman story is related in Virgil's Aeneid and other works.
RS99251. Silver denarius, RSC III 549; BMCRE V p. 258, S515; SRCV II 6882, Hunter III 61; cf. RIC IV 166 (Roma holds Victory), RIC IV 167 (aureus), Choice aVF, centered, toned, flow lines, die wear, weight 3.448 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, 206 - 210 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, older youth's unbearded laureate head right; reverse RESTITVTOR VRBIS, Roma seated left, oval shield against near side of seat, helmeted, Palladium in right hand, spear vertical behind in left hand; very rare; $170.00 SALE PRICE $153.00


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Edessa Macedonia

|Roman| |Macedonia|, |Elagabalus,| |16| |May| |218| |-| |11| |March| |222| |A.D.,| |Edessa| |Macedonia||AE| |24|
Edessa, in the central Macedonia region of Greece, was known as the "City of Waters". The city achieved certain prominence in the first centuries AD, being located on the Via Egnatia, a road constructed by the Romans in the 2nd century BC. It crossed Illyricum, Macedonia, and Thracia, running through territory that is now part of modern Albania, North Macedonia, Greece, and European Turkey as a continuation of the Via Appia. From 27 BC to 268 AD it had its own mint.
RP96945. Bronze AE 24, Varbanov I 3631, Moushmov 6269, RPC Online -, SNG Cop -, BMC -, Choice F, nice dark green patina, well centered, some porosity, central cavity on obverse, weight 10.379 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 180o, Edessa Macedonia mint, 16 May 218 - 11 Mar 222 A.D.; obverse AV K M AVP ANTΩNINOC, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse E∆ECCAIΩN, Roma seated left on a cuirass, wearing Corinthian helmet, Nike in right hand, stage at her feet, City goddess standing left behind her, crowning her with wreath in right hand, scepter in left hand; $135.00 SALE PRICE $122.00


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

|Septimius| |Severus|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.||denarius|
The flattering appellation "the restorer of the city" was doubtless given not for either rebuilding or embellishing Rome, but rather for restoring the honor of the "Eternal City" by avenging the death of Pertinax, securing domestic tranquility to the empire, and reestablishing respect for the Roman name by victories over the Parthians.
RS98682. Silver denarius, RIC IV 288; RSC III 606; BMCRE V p. 221, 359; Hunter III 98; SRCV II 6358, gF, centered, light toning, edge cracks, struck with a worn reverse died, weight 2.397 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 202 - 210 A.D.; obverse SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse RESTITVTOR VRBIS, Roma seated left on shield, helmeted, palladium in right hand, spear vertical behind in left hand; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Synnada, Phrygia, 3rd Century A.D.

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Synnada,| |Phrygia,| |3rd| |Century| |A.D.||AE| |26|
Synnada (Suhut, Turkey today) was of considerable importance as a station on the road from Apameia to the north and east. Synnada was celebrated throughout the Roman Empire for its precious Synnadic marble, a light color marble interspersed with purple spots and veins. From quarries on Mount Persis in neighboring Docimeium, it was conveyed through Synnada to Ephesus, from which it was shipped over sea to Italy.
RP99044. Bronze AE 26, SNGvA 3980; SNG Cop 724; BMC Phrygia p. 398, 31, Choice F, well centered, green patina, light earthen deposits, weight 6.965 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 270o, Synnada (Suhut, Turkey) mint, 3rd century A.D.; obverse ΘEA PΩMH, helmeted and draped bust of Roma right; reverse CYNNA∆EΩN, clasped right hands; rare; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.

|Nero|, |Nero,| |13| |October| |54| |-| |9| |June| |68| |A.D.||sestertius|
Roma was a female deity who personified the city of Rome and more broadly, the Roman state. The earliest certain cult to dea Roma was established at Smyrna in 195 B.C., probably to mark the successful alliance against Antiochus III. In 30/29 B.C., the Koinon of Asia and Bithynia requested permission to honor Augustus as a living god. "Republican" Rome despised the worship of a living man, but an outright refusal might offend their loyal allies. A cautious formula was drawn up, non-Romans could only establish a cult for divus Augustus jointly with dea Roma. In the city of Rome itself, the earliest known state cult to dea Roma was combined with Venus at the Hadrianic Temple of Venus and Roma. This was the largest temple in the city, probably dedicated to inaugurate the reformed festival of Parilia, which was known thereafter as the Romaea after the Eastern festival in Roma's honor. The temple contained the seated, Hellenised image of dea Roma with a Palladium in her right hand to symbolize Rome's eternity.
SH34948. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC I 247, BMCRE I 178, Good VF, Tiber patina, weight 28.904 g, maximum diameter 34.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 66 A.D.; obverse NERO CLAVD CAESAR AVG GER P M TR P IMP P P, laureate head left; reverse Roma seated left on cuirass and shields, right foot on helmet, holding Victory and parazonium, ROMA in exergue, S - C at sides; fine style, ex Edward J. Waddel; SOLD


Roman Republic, Manius Fonteius C.f., c. 85 B.C.

|99-50| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Manius| |Fonteius| |C.f.,| |c.| |85| |B.C.||denarius|
Vejovis is a little-known Italian deity. He was worshiped in a temple on the Capitol in Rome. The reverse most likely depicts a statue that was beside the statue of Vejovis in the temple. This statue may refer to the infancy of Jupiter who was suckled by the goat Amaltheia on Mount Ida.

The thyrsus is the staff carried by Bacchus and his associates; topped by a pine cone or a bunch of ivy leaves and wreathed with tendrils of vine or ivy.
RR75243. Silver denarius, Crawford 353/1a, Sydenham 724, RSC I Fonteia 9, BMCRR I Rome 2476, Russo RBW 1350, SRCV I 271, Choice aEF, well centered and struck, nicely toned, a few light scratches, weight 3.813 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 85 B.C.; obverse MN FONTEI C F (MN and NT in monogram) downward behind, laureate head of Vejovis right, thunderbolt below neck truncation, Roma monogram below chin; reverse Cupid seated on goat right, caps of the Dioscuri above, thyrsus of Bacchus in exergue, all within laurel wreath; ex Naville auction 9, lot 175, ex Tkalec sale 2006, 106, ex NAC 46 (April 2008), lot 369; SOLD


Roman Republic, Manius Fonteius C.f., c. 85 B.C.

|99-50| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Manius| |Fonteius| |C.f.,| |c.| |85| |B.C.||denarius|
Vejovis is a little-known Italian deity. He was worshiped in a temple on the Capitol in Rome. The reverse most likely depicts a statue that was beside the statue of Vejovis in the temple. This statue may refer to the infancy of Jupiter who was suckled by the goat Amaltheia on Mount Ida.

The thyrsus is the staff carried by Bacchus and his associates; topped by a pine cone or a bunch of ivy leaves and wreathed with tendrils of vine or ivy.
RR95406. Silver denarius, Russo RBW 1352, Crawford 353/1d, Sydenham 724b, RSC I Fonteia 11, BMCRR I Rome 2481, SRCV I 271, EF, toned, slightly off center on a tight flan, weight 4.049 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, c. 85 B.C.; obverse MN FONTEI C F (MN and NT ligate), laureate head of Vejovis right, thunderbolt below neck truncation, Roma monogram right; reverse Cupid seated on goat right, flanked by caps of the Dioscuri, thyrsus of Bacchus in exergue, all within laurel wreath; ex Forum (2009), fabulous reverse, scarcer variety with the caps flanking the goat vice above; SOLD


Flavius Victor, c. 387 - 28 July 388 A.D.

|Flavius| |Victor|, |Flavius| |Victor,| |c.| |387| |-| |28| |July| |388| |A.D.||siliqua|
In England, where many siliquae are found clipped, silver Roman coins apparently continued to circulate long after the Empire abandoned the island. Clipping may not have been primarily intended to deviously obtain a little silver. Clipping may have actually been performed primarily to make the weight and value equivalent to contemporary coins in the medieval period.
RL84418. Silver siliqua, RIC IX Milan 19b (S), RSC V 6Ac, Cohen VIII 6 (15 Fr.), Hunter V 4, SRCV V 20670, VF, toned, clipped, weight 0.791 g, maximum diameter 11.8 mm, die axis 0o, Mediolanum (Milan, Italy) mint, c. 387 - 28 Jul 388 A.D.; obverse D N FL VICTOR P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS ROMANORVM (courage of the Romans), Roma seated facing on throne, head left, globe in right hand, reversed spear in left, MDPS in exergue; rare; SOLD







CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Wednesday, May 25, 2022.
Page created in 1.109 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity