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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Military| ▸ |Legionary||View Options:  |  |  | 

Coins of the Roman Legions

Legionarii is the name give to the foot soldiers of the Roman legions. The horsemen were distinguished by the appellation of Equites. The term of sixteen years was the period fixed for the service of the Legionarii. Before the reign of Septimius Severus they were not permitted to marry, or at least to have their wives with them in the camp. The military discipline of these troops was very severe. They led a life of great hardship, and made long marches, laden with heavy burdens. During peace they were employed in working on the fortifications of towns and of camps, as well as in repairing the high roads.


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Legio X Fretensis Countermark

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In 72 A.D. the Roman governor Lucius Flavius Silva laid siege to Masada, a desert fortress, the last outpost of the Jewish rebels following the end in 70 of the First Jewish Revolt. The Legio X Fretensis surrounded the mountain fortress with a 7-mile long siege wall and built a rampart of stones and beaten earth against the western approach. In the Spring of 73 A.D., 960 Zealots under the leadership of Eleazar ben Ya'ir committed mass suicide when defeat became imminent.
SL89795. Orichalcum dupondius, RIC II 1156, Lyon 41, BMCRE II , Cohen I , SRCV I; countermark: Howgego 733 (reign of Domitian, 84-96 A.D.), NGC G, strike 4/5, surface 3/5, countermark LXF [=Legio X Fretensis] (2490386-006), weight 10.912 g, maximum diameter 27.9 mm, die axis 180o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 71 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG COS III (or IIII), radiate head right, globe at point of bust; countermark: LXF (Legio X Fretensis) in a rectangular punch; reverse SECVRITAS AVGVSTI, Securitas seated right, resting head on raised hand, long scepter vertical in left hand, flaming altar to right, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; $600.00 (528.00)


Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus, 161 - 169 A.D., Mark Antony Restitution

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"Restitution" issue by Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus commemorating the famous legionary denarii of Marc Antony. The legion VI Ferrata, the "Ironclad", was an old legion of Caesar's that fought for Antony. It must have been chosen for the restitution for its presumably key-role during Verus' successful Parthian campaign.
RS89768. Silver denarius, BMCRE IV p. 456, 500; RIC III p. 248, 443; MIR 18 120-4; RSC I Antony 83; Cohen I Antony 83; SRCV II p. 341, 5236, choice gVF, excellent centering, toning, flow lines, some die wear, small coppery spots, weight 3.031 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 165 - 166 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVGVR III VIR R P C, war galley, five oarsman visible, rowing left over waves, helmsman and rudder in stern; reverse ANTONINVS ET VERVS AVG REST, aquila (legionary eagle) in center, eagle turned right, between two legionary standards, standard on right surmounted by Victory standing left and extending wreath, LEG - VI across center divided by aquila; rare; $450.00 SALE |PRICE| $405.00


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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"Legio II Augusta took part in Claudius' invasion of Britain in AD 43 and thereafter was permanently based in the province. From AD 74/5 it was stationed as Isca (Caerleon) in sought Wales." -- David Sear, p. 200, Roman Coins and Their Values IV
RA73482. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 58 (R2), Hunter IV 4, Webb Carausius 63, Askew 143, SRCV IV 13608, aF, rough, porous, weight 2.657 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 225o, Londinium (London, England) mint, 287 - 288 A.D.; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse LEG II AVG, Capricorn left, ML in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; very rare; $195.00 (171.60)


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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The legends are mostly off flan. Reverse legend possibilities include LEG XX V V, LEG XX AVG, LEG II PARTH, LEG V [...] S M AVG. The mintmark may be retrograde MC, which is known for Camulodunum (Colchester, England), but no boar standing right types are published for Camulodunum. Perhaps the mintmark is retrograde ML, but that too is unpublished. This was likely struck in an unofficial mint (an ancient counterfeit?). Carausius' legionary boar types are highly desirable, and all seem to be quite rare. We do not know of another specimen of this variety.
RA73285. Billon antoninianus, cf. RIC V-2 82 (R2), Cohen VII 148, Hunter IV 13, Webb Carausius 97 - 99, Askew 151, SRCV IV 13617, aF, green patina, earthen deposits, tight flan cutting off legends, a little rough, weight 3.769 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 45o, unofficial(?) mint, c. 287 A.D.; obverse [IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG?], radiate and draped bust right, early reign 'moustache' portrait; reverse L[EG...], boar standing right, large tusks, prominent ridge of spinal bristles, [reversed C?]M in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; very rare; $190.00 (167.20)


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Southeastern Anatolia, Uncertain Mint

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This type was struck in 26 B.C. when Augustus was consul for the 8th time and, as we learn from the reverse legends of their coinage, T. Vomanius and M. Memmius Flam. were quinquennial douvirs, for the second time. RPC I notes that the humped bulls on the reverse of this type, and a twin goddess reverse type struck by the same douvirs, suggest the mint was in southeastern Anatolia, but the mint city remains uncertain.
RP89869. Bronze AE 22, RPC I 5412 (3 spec.), aF, porous, a little rough, weight 7.189 g, maximum diameter 21.9 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Roman colony mint, 26 B.C.; obverse IMP CAESAR DIVI F AVGVSTVS COS VIII, bare head right; reverse T VOMAN M MEMM FLAM QVINQ ITER, two priests with yoke of two humped oxen right, plowing the pomerium (sacred boundary), founding the new colony; behind, aquila between two signa; only two sales of this type recorded on Coin Archives in the last two decades; very rare; $150.00 (132.00)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D.

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In 113, Trajan's Column near the Colosseum in Rome was completed to commemorate the Emperor's victory over the Dacians in the Second Dacian War.
RS88848. Silver denarius, Woytek 419v1, BMCRE III 461, RIC II 294, RSC II 577a, Hunter II 157, Strack 195, SRCV II 3170, F, flow lines, tight flan, reverse slightly off center, small flaw below ear, die wear, small edge cracks, weight 3.213 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 210o, Rome mint, c. spring 113 - summer 114 A.D.; obverse IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI P P, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI, three standards, vexillum topped with a wreath on left, aquila (legionary eagle cohort standard) in center, standard topped with a hand on right; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 72, part of lot 1047; scarce; $130.00 (114.40)


Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

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In 333, Constantine pulled Roman troops out of Britain and abandoned work on the Hadrian's Wall.
RL87912. Billon reduced centenionalis, Hunter V 24 (also 1st officina), RIC VII Trier 539, LRBC I 63, SRCV V 17314, Cohen VIII 122, Choice gVF, green patina, bumps and marks, small edge splits, weight 1.376 g, maximum diameter 14.1 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, as caesar, 332 - 333 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA EXERCITVS (glory of the army), two soldiers standing facing, heads turned inward confronted, two standards in center between them, each holds a spear in outer hand and rests inner hand on grounded shield, TRP in exergue; ex Beast Coins; $85.00 (74.80)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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In February 313, Constantine met with Licinius in Milan, where they developed the Edict of Milan. The edict stated that Christians should be allowed to follow the faith without oppression. This removed penalties for professing Christianity, under which many had been martyred previously, and returned confiscated Church property. The edict protected from religious persecution not only Christians but all religions, allowing anyone to worship whichever deity they chose. A similar edict had been issued in 311 by Galerius, then senior emperor of the Tetrarchy; Galerius' edict granted Christians the right to practice their religion but did not restore any property to them. The Edict of Milan included several clauses which stated that all confiscated churches would be returned as well as other provisions for previously persecuted Christians.
RL91855. Billon follis, Hunter V 164 (also 2nd officina), RIC VI Rome 348a, SRCV IV 16128, Cohen VII 557, gVF, excellent portrait, tight flan, encrustations, weight 3.705 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Rome mint, 312 - 313 A.D.; obverse IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI, three standards topped from left to right by a hand, eagle and wreath, RS in exergue; $60.00 (52.80)


Philippi, Macedonia, 41 - 68 A.D.

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This coin has traditionally been attributed to Augustus, but due to its copper composition, RPC attributes it as likely from Claudius to Nero; Philippi probably did not issue copper coins during the reign of Augustus.
RP92634. Bronze AE 19, RPC I 1651, SNG ANS 674, SNG Cop 305, Varbanov III 3229, BMC Macedonia 23, AMNG III 14, Choice VF, round flan, brown tone, some porosity, light deposits, weight 4.024 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 180o, Philippi (near Filippoi, Greece) mint, 41 - 68 A.D.; obverse Victory standing left on base, raising wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand over left shoulder, VIC - AVG divided across field; reverse COHOR PRAE, three standards, PHIL in exergue; $60.00 (52.80)







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Catalog current as of Friday, October 18, 2019.
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