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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Crisis & Decline| ▸ |Philip I||View Options:  |  |  | 

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

Marcus Julius Verus Philippus, known as Philip I "The Arab" was the Praetorian Prefect and the successor to Gordian III, whom he possibly had murdered. After signing a treaty with the Persians, he returned home. During his reign, the 1000th anniversary of the foundation of Rome (248 A.D.) was celebrated and magnificent games were held on a scale rarely seen. In 249 A.D., a series of rebellions occurred, both Philip and his son were killed after their army was defeated near Verona by the forces of Trajan Decius.

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Samosata, Commagene

|Roman| |Syria|, |Philip| |I| |the| |Arab,| |February| |244| |-| |End| |of| |September| |249| |A.D.,| |Samosata,| |Commagene||provincial| |sestertius|
Samosata was an ancient city on the right (west) bank of the Euphrates whose ruins existed at the modern city of Samsat, Adiyaman Province, Turkey until the site was flooded by the newly constructed Atatürk Dam. The founder of the city was Sames, a Satrap of Commagene who made it his capital. The city was sometimes called Antiochia in Commagene and served as the capital for the Hellenistic Kingdom of Commagene from c. 160 BC until it was surrendered to Rome in 72. A civil metropolis from the days of Emperor Hadrian, Samosata was the home of the Legio VI Ferrata and later Legio XVI Flavia Firma, and the terminus of several military roads. Seven Christian martyrs were crucified in 297 in Samosata for refusing to perform a pagan rite in celebration of the victory of Maximian over the Sassanids. It was at Samosata that Julian II had ships made in his expedition against Sapor, and it was a natural crossing-place in the struggle between Heraclius and Chosroes in the 7th century.
RY92573. Bronze provincial sestertius, BMC Galatia p. 122, 48; RPC VIII U8340; Butcher CRS 31a; SNG Righetti 1843; SNG Hunterian II 2611, VF, nice portrait, well centered on broad flan, porous, a few pits, weight 17.563 g, maximum diameter 33.0 mm, die axis 180o, Samosata (site now flooded by the Atatürk Dam) mint, Feb 244 - End Sep 249 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse ΦΛ CAMOCATEWN MHTROP KOM, Tyche of Samosata (city-goddess) seated left on rocks, wearing turreted crown, grain in right hand, eagle perched facing on right arm with wings open and head left, small Pegasos galloping left at her feet; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $110.00 (€101.20)
 


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Philip| |I| |the| |Arab,| |February| |244| |-| |End| |of| |September| |249| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||tetradrachm|
Marcus Julius Verus Philippus, known as Philip I "The Arab" was the Praetorian Prefect and the successor to Gordian III, whom he possibly had murdered. After signing a treaty with the Persians, he returned home. During his reign, the 1000th anniversary of the foundation of Rome (248 A.D.) was celebrated and magnificent games were held on a scale rarely seen. In 249 A.D., a series of rebellions occurred, both Philip and his son were killed after their army was defeated near Verona by the forces of Trajan Decius.
RX93392. Billon tetradrachm, Milne 3740, Geissen 2733 var. (obv. legend), BMC 1995 var. (same), Dattari 4936 var. (same) Kampmann 74.74 var. (same), VF, centered, porous, corrosion, edge flaw, edge crack, weight 10.336 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 247 - 28 Aug 248 A.D.; obverse A K M IOV ΦIΛIΠΠOC E, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse eagle standing left, wings closed, head right, wreath in beak, L - E (year 5) divided across field; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $70.00 (€64.40)
 


Julius Marinus, Father of Philip the Arab, Philippopolis, Arabia

|Philip| |I|, |Julius| |Marinus,| |Father| |of| |Philip| |the| |Arab,| |Philippopolis,| |Arabia||AE| |23|
Philip the Arab was born in a small village in Provincia Arabia. After he became emperor, he renamed it Philippopolis and an extensive construction program began changing the village to a city. Among its coins are this rare type that honors Julius Marinus, Philip's father.
SH15300. Bronze AE 23, SNG ANS 1402, Spijkerman 2, BMC Arabia p. 42, 2, Fair, holed, weight 6.513 g, maximum diameter 23.5 mm, die axis 180o, Philippopolis (Plovdiv, Bulgaria) mint, 244 - 249; obverse ΘEΩ MAPINΩ, Julius Marinus' bust right, carried by eagle; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOΠOΛITΩN KOΛΩNIAΣ S - C, Roma standing left, patera in right hand, spear in left hand, shield at feet right; rare; SOLD







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OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

IMPCAESMIVLPHILIPPVSAVG
IMPCMIVLPHILLIPVSPFAVGPM
IMPIVLPHILIPPVSPIVSFELAVGPM
IMPIVLPHILIPPVSPIVSFELIXAVGPM
IMPMIVLPHILIPPVSAVG
IMPPHILIPPVSAVG
MIVLPHILIPPVSAVG
MIVLPHILIPPVSAVGMIVLPHILIPPVSNC


REFERENCES|

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Bland, R. "Dr. Bland's List for Philip I and Family" - http://ettuantiquities.com/Philip_1/Philip1-Bland-list.htm
Calicó, X. The Roman Avrei, vol. 2: From Didius Julianus to Constantius I, 193 AD - 335 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 5: Gordian I to Valerian II. (Paris, 1885).
Göbl, R. "Römischer Münzhort Tulln 1966 (Septimius Severus - Gallienus)" in NZ 83 (1969). pp. 7-57, pl. 1-48.
Mattingly, H., E. Sydenham & C. Sutherland. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol IV, From Pertinax to Uranius Antoninus. (London, 1986).
Muona, J. "The Antoniniani of Philip the Arab" in The Celator, Feb. 2002, p. 10.
Muona, J. "The Imperial mints of Philip the Arab" - https://www.forumancientcoins.com/Articles/Philip_Arab/index.html
Óvári, F. "Philippus antiochiai veretu antoninianusairól" in Numizmatikai Közlöny 88/89 (1989/90), pp. 41 - 48.
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. III. Pertinax to Aemilian. (Oxford, 1977).
Seaby, H. & D. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Volume IV, Gordian III to Postumus. (London, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values III, The Accession of Maximinus I to the Death of Carinus AD 235 - AD 285. (London, 2005).
Thibaut, M. Antoniniani from the Mint of Antioch Under the Reign of Philip the Arab (244-249 AD) - http://marchal.thibaut.free.fr/e_index.htm
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

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