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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Other Anatolia||View Options:  |  |  | 

Other Anatolia

Anatolia, also known as Asia Minor, Asian Turkey, Anatolian peninsula, or Anatolian plateau, is the westernmost protrusion of Asia, which makes up the majority of modern-day Turkey. The region is bounded by the Black Sea to the north, the Mediterranean Sea to the south, and the Aegean Sea to the west. The Sea of Marmara forms a connection between the Black and Aegean Seas through the Bosphorus and Dardanelles straits and separates Anatolia from Thrace on the European mainland. The ancient inhabitants of Anatolia spoke the now-extinct Anatolian languages, which were largely replaced by the Greek language starting from classical antiquity and during the Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods. The Turkification of Anatolia began under the Seljuk Empire in the late 11th century and continued under the Ottoman Empire between the early 14th and early 20th centuries.

Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Parion, Mysia(?)

|Parium|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Parion,| |Mysia(?)||AE| |15|
The attribution of this very rare type to Parium is uncertain. See RPC II p. 137.

The ceremonial founding of a new Roman colony included plowing a furrow, the pomerium, a sacred boundary, around the site of the new city.
RP94451. Bronze AE 15, RPC II Online 889 (12 spec.), SNGvA 6202, F, dark brown patina, light corrosion, tight flan, weight 3.575 g, maximum diameter 15.3 mm, die axis 0o, Parion, Mysia(?) mint, 13 Sep 81 - 18 Sep 96 A.D.; obverse DO-MIT AVG (clockwise from the upper right), laureate head left; reverse priest plowing right with two oxen, marking the pomerium (sacred boundary marked for the foundation of a new Roman colony), GERM in exergue; zero sales of this type recorded on Coin Archives in the last two decades; very rare; $110.00 (€90.20)
 


Anatolia (Uncertain Mint) Mid 3rd - 1st Century B.C.

|Other| |Anatolia|, |Anatolia| |(Uncertain| |Mint)
Mid| |3rd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.||obol|
Lacking a legend, this rare issue has been attributed to Ephesos by CNG, likely because similar Artemis and stag types are typical of Ephesos, and perhaps knowing more about their find context.
SH35079. Silver obol, SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; SNG Kayhan -; Klein -; cf. CNG auction 161, lot 64 and Mail Bid Sale 75, lot 374, VF, toned, lightly etched surfaces , weight 0.413 g, maximum diameter 7.6 mm, die axis 0o, Ephesos(?) mint, mid 3rd - 1st century B.C.; obverse bust of Artemis right, bow and quiver over shoulder; reverse forepart of stag left, head reverted; very rare; SOLD


Otho, 15 January 69 - 17 April 69 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Otho,| |15| |January| |69| |-| |17| |April| |69| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||tetradrachm|
The goddess Kratesis, whose attributes are a Nike and a trophy, is neither Victory nor Virtus, the two Roman types she most resembles. She is the goddess of Roman strength and authority.
RX92583. Billon tetradrachm, RPC I 5361; Geissen 249; Dattari 328; Milne 366; Curtis 239; BMC Alexandria 210; SNG BnF 690; SNG Cop 158; SNG Milan 766; Kampmann 18.7; Emmett 185, gF, toned, well centered on a tight flan cutting off part of legends, a few scratches, slight porosity, weight 11.045 g, maximum diameter 25.1 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 15 Jan 69 - 17 Apr 69 A.D.; obverse AYTOK MAPK OΘΩNOΣ KAIΣ ΣEB, laureate head right, LA (year 1) lower right; reverse KPA-TH-ΣIΣ, Kratesis standing facing, head left, wearing chiton, Nike offering wreath in her extended right hand, trophy of captured arms in her left hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; SOLD


Lycia(?), 5th Century B.C.

|Lycia|, |Lycia(?),| |5th| |Century| |B.C.||hemidrachm|
Although unlisted in the major references, this hemidrachm type was first published by 1890. Five examples are listed on Coin Archives, which were offered at auction in the last two decades.

The chimera (also chimaera) was, according to Greek mythology, a monstrous fire-breathing creature of Lycia in Anatolia, composed of the parts of three animals - a lion, a snake, and a goat. Usually depicted as a lion, with the head of a goat arising from its back, and a tail that ended in a snake's head, the Chimera was one of the offspring of Typhon and Echidna and a sibling of such monsters as Cerberus and the Lernaean Hydra. The term chimera has come to describe any mythical or fictional animal with parts taken from various animals, or to describe anything perceived as wildly imaginative or implausible.
GA84765. Silver hemidrachm, Boston MFA 2325; Greenwell 1897, p. 281, 2; Six Monnaies 1890, p. 235, 16bis; BMC -; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; Rosen -; Klein -, VF, light marks, obverse off center, reverse struck with damaged die (left side of incuse), weight 1.946 g, maximum diameter 11.6 mm, Anatolia, uncertain mint, 5th century B.C.; obverse Chimera standing right, right foreleg raised, jaws open; reverse gorgoneion (facing head of Medusa), snaky locks, tongue protruding, within incuse square; extremely rare; SOLD







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REFERENCES|

Babelon, E. Traité des Monnaies Grecques et Romaines. (Paris, 1901-1932).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (London, 1992 - ).
Grose, S. Catalogue of the McClean Collection of Greek Coins, Fitzwilliam Museum, Vol. III: Asia Minor, Farther Asia, Egypt, Africa. (Cambridge, 1929).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of Northern and Central Anatolia, Pontos, Paphlagonia, Bithynia, Phrygia, Galatia, Lykaonia, and Kappadokia...Fifth to First Centuries BC. HGC 7. (Lancaster, PA, 2012).
Imhoof-Blumer, F. Zur griechischen und römischen Münzkunde. (Geneva, 1908).
Klein, Dieter. Sammlung von griechischen Kleinsilbermünzen und Bronzen. Nomismata 3. (Milano, 1999).
Lindgren, H. & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coins of Asia Minor and the Levant. (San Mateo, 1985).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Newell, E. The Coinage of Demetrius Poliorcetes. (London, 1927).
Price, M. The Coinage of in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus. (London, 1991).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2: Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum. (Copenhagen, 1942-1979).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung. (Berlin, 1968-present).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Finland, The Erkki Keckman Collection in the Skopbank, Helsinki, Part II: Asia Minor except Karia. (Helsinki, 1999).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Cabinet des Médailles, Bibliothéque Nationale. (Paris, 1993-2001).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IV, Fitzwilliam Museum, Leake and General Collections. (London, 1940-1971).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, USA, The Collection of the American Numismatic Society. (New York, 1969 -).
Various authors. A Catalogue of Greek Coins in the British Museum. (London, 1873-1927).

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