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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Other Anatolia||View Options:  |  |  |   

Other Anatolia

Anatolia, also known as Asia Minor, Asian Turkey, Anatolian peninsula, or Anatolian plateau, is the westernmost protrusion of Asia, which makes up the majority of modern-day Turkey. The region is bounded by the Black Sea to the north, the Mediterranean Sea to the south, and the Aegean Sea to the west. The Sea of Marmara forms a connection between the Black and Aegean Seas through the Bosphorus and Dardanelles straits and separates Anatolia from Thrace on the European mainland. The ancient inhabitants of Anatolia spoke the now-extinct Anatolian languages, which were largely replaced by the Greek language starting from classical antiquity and during the Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods. The Turkification of Anatolia began under the Seljuk Empire in the late 11th century and continued under the Ottoman Empire between the early 14th and early 20th centuries.


Eastern Anatolia (Uncertain City), Mid 3rd Century B.C., Restoration of Lysimachos', Portrait of Alexander the Great

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The mint is uncertain. The MYP monogram in the exergue might indicate Myrina, Aeolis, but probably not as most monograms on Lysimachos type tetradrachms do not indicate the mint city.
SH90220. Silver tetradrachm, Not in the many references examined and no other examples known to Forum; Thompson -, Müller -, Marinescu -, SNG Cop -, SNG Berry -, et al. -, gVF, porosity, light scratches, weight 16.994 g, maximum diameter 33.2 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain mint, mid-3rd century B.C.; obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great wearing the horn of Ammon; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΛYΣIMAXOY, Athena Nikephoros enthroned left, Nike crowning name in right, left arm resting on shield at side behind, transverse spear against right side, Φ inner left, MYP monogram in exergue; ex CNG auction 324, lot 29; possibly unique; SOLD


Lycia(?), 5th Century B.C.

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Although unlisted in the major references, this hemidrachm type was first published by 1890. Five examples are listed on Coin Archives, which were offered at auction in the last two decades.

The chimera (also chimaera) was, according to Greek mythology, a monstrous fire-breathing creature of Lycia in Anatolia, composed of the parts of three animals - a lion, a snake, and a goat. Usually depicted as a lion, with the head of a goat arising from its back, and a tail that ended in a snake's head, the Chimera was one of the offspring of Typhon and Echidna and a sibling of such monsters as Cerberus and the Lernaean Hydra. The term chimera has come to describe any mythical or fictional animal with parts taken from various animals, or to describe anything perceived as wildly imaginative or implausible.
GA84765. Silver hemidrachm, Boston MFA 2325; Greenwell 1897, p. 281, 2; Six Monnaies 1890, p. 235, 16bis; BMC -; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; Rosen -; Klein -, VF, light marks, obverse off center, reverse struck with damaged die (left side of incuse), weight 1.946 g, maximum diameter 11.6 mm, Anatolia, uncertain mint, 5th century B.C.; obverse Chimera standing right, right foreleg raised, jaws open; reverse gorgoneion (facing head of Medusa), snaky locks, tongue protruding, within incuse square; extremely rare; SOLD


Anatolia (Lycia?), 5th Century B.C.

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Although unlisted in the major references, a similar hemidrachm type was first published by 1897. Six obols of this type, including this coin, are listed on Coin Archives having been offered at auction in the last two decades.

The chimera was, according to Greek mythology, a monstrous fire-breathing creature of Lycia, composed of the parts of three animals - a lion, a snake, and a goat or stag. Usually depicted as a lion, with the head of a goat arising from its back, and a tail that ending with a snake's head, the Chimera was one of the offspring of Typhon and Echidna and a sibling of such monsters as Cerberus and the Lernaean Hydra. The term chimera has come to describe any mythical or fictional animal with parts taken from various animals, or to describe anything perceived as wildly imaginative or implausible.
GS87477. Silver obol, 6 specimens known from auctions, otherwise unpublished; cf. Boston MFA 2325 (hemidrachm), Greenwell 1897, p. 281, 2 (= Boston MFA 2325), VF, well centered, toned, lightly etched surfaces, bumps and scratches, die wear, weight 0.662 g, maximum diameter 7.8 mm, die axis 270o, uncertain (Lycian?) mint, 5th century B.C.; obverse chimera standing (right?) with heads of a lion (in center with looking left), stag, and serpent, joined on one quadruped body at the center and radiating outward; reverse gorgoneion (facing head of Medusa), snaky locks, tongue protruding, within incuse square; ex Numismatic Naumann, auction 62 (4 Feb 2018), lot 127; extremely rare; SOLD


Anatolia, c. 4th Century B.C.

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SH17236. Silver trihemiobol, unpublished, cf. CNG 64 , 304 and Baldwin's 10/3, 471, VF, obverse off-center, weight 1.050 g, maximum diameter 9.8 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain mint, obverse uncertain, astragalos (knuckle bone)? or head right?; reverse crude owl facing in incuse square; lightly toned; possibly unique; SOLD


Skione, Macedonia, 480 - 450 B.C.

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This is the only hemiobol of this type known to Forum. It is not listed in the references examined and we did not find another online. A nearly identical and certainly related obol is known from the market and the given references. The origin of the type is uncertain. Most references attribute the obols to Skione, Macedonia, but reported finds apparently indicate a mint in Anatolia. Some dealers attribute the obols to Neandria, Troas, others to Phokia, Ionia, and others to an uncertain mint in Ionia or in Asia Minor.
GA83593. Silver hemiobol, Apparently unpublished, cf. Traité I, 1631 (obol, Skione), SNG ANS 703 (same), Rosen 109 (same); SNG Kayhan 743 (obol, uncertain mint), gVF, weight 0.35 g, maximum diameter 6.6 mm, die axis 0o, Skione mint, 480 - 450 B.C.; obverse Corinthian helmet left; reverse quadripartite incuse square; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 21 (31 Oct 2015), lot 161; extremely rare; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III and Alexander IV - Kassander, 323 - 310 B.C.

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Struck after Alexander's death during or after the joint reign of Alexander's mentally disabled half-brother, Philip III, and Alexander's infant son with Roxana, Alexander IV. The two were made joint kings by Alexander's generals who only intended to use them as pawns. Philip III was imprisoned upon his return to Macedonia, and in 317 B.C. he was executed under orders from Olympias. Olympias was Alexander the Great's mother and Alexander IV's grandmother, but not Philip III's mother. Alexander IV and his mother Roxana were executed by the boy's regent, Kassander, in 311 B.C.
GB83490. Bronze unit, Price 2799, SNG Cop 1116, SNG München 918, SNG Saroglos 856, Müller Alexander -, Choice gVF, weight 6.058 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Western Anatolia mint, c. 323 - 310 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse bow inside case right above, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) across center, club left over torch left tied with fillets below; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III & Alexander IV - Ptolemy Keraunos, c. 323 - 280 B.C., In the Name of Alexander

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Ptolemy Keraunos was the King of Macedon from 281 BC to 279 B.C. His epithet Keraunos is Greek for "Thunder" or "Thunderbolt." He was the eldest son of Ptolemy I Soter of Egypt. After his younger half-brother, also called Ptolemy, ascended to the throne as Ptolemy II, Keraunos had to leave Egypt, being a potential rival for the throne. He arrived at the first at the court of Lysimachus and then moved to the court of Seleucus. After Lysimachus' defeat and death in the Battle of Corupedium in 281 B.C., Keraunos murdered Seleucus I in order to take the power of his former protector. He then rushed to Lysimacheia where he had himself acclaimed king by the Macedonian army. He did not rule long. In 279 B.C., he was captured and killed fighting against the massive raids by Gauls into Macedonia and Greece.
GS75253. Silver drachm, cf. Price 2778, VF, toned, nice style, die wear, light cleaning marks on reverse, weight 4.068 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Western Anatolia mint, 323 - 280 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on backless throne, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, monogram left, monogram(?) or control symbol(?) under throne; SOLD


Kingdom of Commagene, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, 38 - 72 A.D.

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Commagene was located in modern south-central Turkey, with its capital at Samosata (the site is now flooded by the Atatürk Dam). Antiochus IV was an ally of Rome against Parthia and the last royal descendant of Seleucus. He ruled with his half-sister and queen Iotape. He was deprived of his kingdom after accusations that he was conspiring against Rome. He retired to Rome where he was treated with great respect for the remainder of his life.
RP85940. Bronze AE 27, straight edge oval flan; RPC I 3857; Nercessian AC 200; BMC Galatia p. 106, 8; Lindgren-Kovacs 1882, VF, black patina with red earthen highlighting, light marks, oval flan typical of the type, some legend unstruck, slight porosity, straight edges, weight 14.000 g, maximum diameter 26.6 mm, die axis 0o, Samosata (site now flooded by the Atatürk Dam) mint, 38 - 72 A.D.; obverse BAΣIΛEYΣ MEΓAΣ ANTIOXOΣ, beardless diademed bust right; reverse KOMMA−ΓHNΩN, scorpion and inscription all within laurel wreath (variety without linear boarders enclosing wreath); SOLD


Kingdom of Commagene, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, 38 - 72 A.D.

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Commagene was located in modern south-central Turkey, with its capital at Samosata (the site is now flooded by the Atatürk Dam). Antiochus IV was an ally of Rome against Parthia and the last royal descendant of Seleucus. He ruled with his half-sister and queen, Iotape. He was deprived of his kingdom after accusations that he was conspiring against Rome. He retired to Rome where he was treated with great respect for the remainder of his life.
GB83137. Bronze AE 27, beveled edge flan; RPC I 3854; BMC Galatia p. 106, 1 ff.; Nercessian AC 199; SNG Cop VII 1; countermark: Howgego 373 (after 69 A.D.), VF, weight 12.418 g, maximum diameter 28.2 mm, die axis 0o, Samosata (site flooded by the Atatürk Dam) mint, 38 - 72 A.D.; obverse BAΣIΛEYΣ ME ANTIOXOΣ EΠI, beardless diademed bust right, countermark: anchor flanked by A-N; reverse KOMMAΓ−HNΩN, scorpion and inscription all within laurel wreath, linear boarder inside wreath, boarder of dots outside wreath; SOLD


Anatolia (Uncertain City), c. 4th Century B.C.

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An astragalos was gaming piece, made from the knuckle-bone of a sheep or goat, used in antiquity in a manner similar to dice.
GA81576. Silver hemiobol, unpublished?, SNG Kayhan -, SNG Keckman -, Asyut -, Tziambazis -, VF, weight 0.315 g, maximum diameter 6.6 mm, uncertain mint, obverse head right; reverse astragalos in incuse square; very rare; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

Babelon, E. Traité des Monnaies Grecques et Romaines. (Paris, 1901-1932).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (London, 1992 - ).
Grose, S. Catalogue of the McClean Collection of Greek Coins, Fitzwilliam Museum, Vol. III: Asia Minor, Farther Asia, Egypt, Africa. (Cambridge, 1929).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of Northern and Central Anatolia, Pontos, Paphlagonia, Bithynia, Phrygia, Galatia, Lykaonia, and Kappadokia...Fifth to First Centuries BC. HGC 7. (Lancaster, PA, 2012).
Imhoof-Blumer, F. Zur griechischen und römischen Münzkunde. (Geneva, 1908).
Klein, Dieter. Sammlung von griechischen Kleinsilbermünzen und Bronzen. Nomismata 3. (Milano, 1999).
Lindgren, H. & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coins of Asia Minor and the Levant. (San Mateo, 1985).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Newell, E. The Coinage of Demetrius Poliorcetes. (London, 1927).
Price, M. The Coinage of in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus. (London, 1991).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2: Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum. (Copenhagen, 1942-1979).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung. (Berlin, 1968-present).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Finland, The Erkki Keckman Collection in the Skopbank, Helsinki, Part II: Asia Minor except Karia. (Helsinki, 1999).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Cabinet des Médailles, Bibliothéque Nationale. (Paris, 1993-2001).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IV, Fitzwilliam Museum, Leake and General Collections. (London, 1940-1971).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, USA, The Collection of the American Numismatic Society. (New York, 1969 -).
Various authors. A Catalogue of Greek Coins in the British Museum. (London, 1873-1927).

Catalog current as of Wednesday, August 21, 2019.
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Other Anatolia