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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Judean & Biblical Coins| ▸ |Biblical Coins| ▸ |Cities in the Bible||View Options:  |  |  | 

Cities in the Bible

The coins below were minted by cities that are mentioned in the bible. Click here to read about the travels of Paul.

Persian Empire, Samaria, c. 375 - 333 B.C.

|Judaea| |&| |Palestine|, |Persian| |Empire,| |Samaria,| |c.| |375| |-| |333| |B.C.||obol|
Meshorer-Qedar lists Athena on the obverse, but on the three specimens known to FORVM it is clear that Athena is on the reverse. The types copy contemporary Cypriot stater types from Kition (obverse) and Lapethus (reverse).
GS95808. Silver obol, Meshorer-Qedar 102, cf. Sofaer Collection 63 (hemiobol), HGC 10 -, VF, well centered, toned, struck with worn dies (as are all specimens of this type known to FORVM), weight 0.65 g, maximum diameter 8 mm, die axis 10o, Samaria (10 km NW of Nablus, West Bank) mint, c. 375 - 333 B.C.; obverse lion right atop and attacking a stag fallen right, (Aramaic 'šn', abbreviating Samarian) above; reverse head of Athena facing, wearing crested Attic helmet; ex Leu Numismatik web auction 11 (22 Feb 2020), lot 1128; ex Canaan Collection; only three sale of this type recorded on Coin Archives for the last two decades (and one of the three is this coin); very rare; $450.00 (€414.00)
 


Judean Kingdom, Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 104 - 76 B.C., Widow's Mite

|Alexander| |Jannaeus|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |Jannaeus| |(Yehonatan),| |104| |-| |76| |B.C.,| |Widow's| |Mite||prutah|NEW
Jesus sat down near the collection box in the Temple and watched as the crowds dropped in their money. Many rich people put in large amounts. A poor widow came and put in two lepta coins, which amount to a quadrans. Jesus said, "I tell you the truth, this poor widow put more into the treasury than all the others. For all of them have contributed out of their abundance; but she out of her poverty has put in everything she had, all she had to live on." (Mark 12:41-44)
JD94910. Bronze prutah, Hendin 1150, Meshorer TJC K, Meshorer AJC C, aVF, as-found blue-green patina and deposits, reverse off center, weight 1.758 g, maximum diameter 14.9 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, 95 - 76 B.C.; obverse star of eight rays and central pellet surrounded by diadem, Paleo-Hebrew inscription "Yehonatan the king" between rays; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY (of King Alexander), upside-down anchor; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $130.00 (€119.60)
 


Sidon, Phoenicia, 9 - 8 B.C.

|Phoenicia|, |Sidon,| |Phoenicia,| |9| |-| |8| |B.C.||AE| |20|NEW
Zeus was enamored of Europa and decided to seduce or ravish her. He transformed himself into a tame white bull and mixed in with her father's herds. While Europa and her female attendants were gathering flowers, she saw the bull, caressed his flanks, and eventually got onto his back. Zeus took that opportunity and ran to the sea and swam, with her on his back, to the island of Crete. He then revealed his true identity, and Europa became the first queen of Crete. Zeus gave her a necklace made by Hephaestus and three additional gifts: Talos, Laelaps and a javelin that never missed. Zeus later re-created the shape of the white bull in the stars, which is now known as the constellation Taurus.
RP97504. Bronze AE 20, RPC Online I 4569 (17 spec.), Rouvier 1438, BMC Phoenicia 164, Baramki 132 ff., SNG Fitz 6058, Lindgren III 1432, cf. SNG Cop 235 (date illegible), F, mottled dark patina, porosity, deposits, areas of corrosion, weight 6.844 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 15o, Sidon (Saida, Lebanon) mint, 9 - 8 B.C.; obverse tetrastyle temple on a high podium, altar in front of temple at center, flanked by a free standing column on each side; reverse Europa seated facing on a bull charging left, holding bulls left horn with her right hand, her billowing veil in her left hand, ΣI∆ΩNIΩN over LΓP (year ) below; $110.00 (€101.20)
 


Lucius Verus, 7 March 161 - February 169 A.D., Antioch, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Lucius| |Verus,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |February| |169| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Syria||semis|
In 162, Marcus Aurelius sent Lucius Verus to lead the war against Parthia. Lucius spent most of the campaign in Antioch, though he wintered at Laodicea and summered at Daphne, a resort just outside Antioch. Critics derided Lucius' luxurious lifestyle. He took up a mistress, enjoyed the company of actors and would "dice the whole night through." The Syrian army was said to spend more time in Antioch's open-air cafés than with their units. The war was, nevertheless, a success. Despite Lucius' minimal personal participation, he was awarded the titles Armeniacus, Medicus and Parthicus Maximus and a triumph upon his return to Rome in 166.
RY93576. Bronze semis, RPC Online IV.3 T7149, McAlee 610, VF, black patina, highlighting earthen deposits, obverse a little off center, weight 7.575 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 161 - 169 A.D.; obverse AVT K Λ AVPHΛ OVHPOC CEB, radiate head right; reverse S•C, uncertain Greek numeral-letter below, all within wreath; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 47 (28 Jun 2018), lot 483; $90.00 (€82.80)
 


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Elagabalus,| |16| |May| |218| |-| |11| |March| |222| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||as|
Richard McAlee notes that ∆ E probably abbreviates ∆ EΠAPXEIΩN, meaning "of the four eparchies. McAlee also list weights for the type ranging from 3.8 - 6.16 grams and a diameter as small as 17mm. This coin is considerably heavier and larger than most examples.
RY93579. Bronze as, McAlee 799; BMC Galatia p. 205, 447; SNG Righetti 2010; Waage 600; SNG Cop -, VF, nice highlighting desert patina, broad heavy flan for the type, weight 11.221 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 16 May 218 - 11 Mar 222 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR ANTONINVS AVG, laureate head right, bare right shoulder seen from behind, slight drapery over left shoulder; reverse ∆ E, star below, all within laurel wreath with ten bunches of leaves and fastened at the top with a garland; ex Roma Numismatics, e-sale 47 (28 Jun 2018), lot 507; scarcer heavy specimen; $90.00 (€82.80)
 


Tarsos, Cilicia, c. 164 - 27 B.C.

|Cilicia|, |Tarsos,| |Cilicia,| |c.| |164| |-| |27| |B.C.||AE| |21|
Sandan was a Hittite-Babylonian sun, storm, or warrior god, also perhaps associated with agriculture. The Greeks equated Sandan with Herakles (Hercules). At Tarsus an annual festival honored Sandan-Herakles, which climaxed when an image of the god was burned on a funeral pyre.
GB93605. Bronze AE 21, SNG Levante 940; SNG BnF 1321 - 22; SNG Cop 333 var. ff. (different controls); BMC Lycaonia p. 180, 95 var. ff. (same), VF, dark patina with highlighting red earthen deposits, bumps, porosity, weight 6.871 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 0o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, c. 164 - 27 B.C.; obverse veiled and turreted head of Tyche right; reverse Sandan standing right on horned and winged animal, on a garlanded base and within a pyramidal pyre surmounted by an eagle, two monograms over filleted club on left, TAPΣEΩN downward on right; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $80.00 (€73.60)
 


Judean Kingdom, Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 104 - 76 B.C.

|Alexander| |Jannaeus|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |Jannaeus| |(Yehonatan),| |104| |-| |76| |B.C.||prutah|
Meshorer wrote of the inscriptions on this type, "The style of the script is distinctive. The letters are large and slight oblique, with sharp lines and edges; they tend toward systematization. The shapes are strong and clear...and contain few variants. The legend is mostly incomplete and contains many errors. Certain characters such as (B), (R), and (D) are almost indistinguishable." The Paleo-Hebrew inscription on this coin reads, from right to left, as follows: YHWN/TN (Yehonatan) [K]HN (Priest) / H (the) GD/WL (high) (HH)/BR (council) YH[WD]/M (Jews). See Reading Judean Coins in NumisWiki.
JD97372. Bronze prutah, Hendin 1144, Meshorer TJC Q, Meshorer AJC F, HGC 10 639, VF, dark patina with highlighting light deposits, off center, weight 2.060 g, maximum diameter 15.6 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, 104 - 76 B.C.; obverse Paleo-Hebrew inscription: Yehonatan the High Priest and the Council of the Jews, surrounded by wreath; reverse double cornucopia adorned with ribbons, pomegranate between horns; $80.00 (€73.60)
 







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