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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Animals||View Options:  |  |  |   

Animals on Ancient Coins

Browse all our coins and antiquities depicting animals below or use the menu on the left to select specific types of animals.

Sybaris, Lucania, Italy, c. 550 - 510 B.C.

|Italy|, |Sybaris,| |Lucania,| |Italy,| |c.| |550| |-| |510| |B.C.||nomos|
The origin of this unusual design is difficult to pinpoint (Rutter 1997). It served no practical purpose in facilitating the stacking of coins, since even with matching images in relief and negative, irregularities would have hindered this method of storage. It has been suggested that Pythagoras, who lived in all three of the cities that pioneered incuse coins and died in Metapontum itself, introduced the technique in an attempt to realize in concrete form a confrontation of opposites that was characteristic of the Pythagorean system of thought. Despite the poetic appeal of this suggestion, it seems highly unlikely, considering that the incuse technique appears to have been adopted about twenty years before Pythagoras made it to southern Italy.
SH98006. Silver nomos, Dewing 405, SNG ANS 817, HN Italy 1729, HGC I 1231 (S), F, porous, scratches, weight 6.930 g, maximum diameter 27.9 mm, die axis 0o, Sybaris mint, c. 550 - 510 B.C.; obverse bull standing left, head turned back right, YM above, dotted border between two circles; reverse incuse of obverse; from the CEB Collection, ex Frank L. Kovacs; scarce; $720.00 (€590.40)


Roman Republic, L. Papius, 79 B.C.

|99-50| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |L.| |Papius,| |79| |B.C.||denarius| |serratus|NEW
In Roman mythology, Juno was the daughter of Saturn and the wife of Jupiter and she had many attributes. Among these was Juno Sospita, who offered protection to women, accompanying them throughout their lives from birth to death. Women called upon her to aid in conception. Juno Sospita was characterized by her goatskin coat and headdress with the horns of a goat. The control marks on this type are normally paired related symbols. Each pair has only one set of dies.
RR98392. Silver denarius serratus, BMCRR I 3070 (same controls); Crawford 384/1, pl. LXVI 94; Sydenham 773; RSC I Papia 1; SRCV I 311, aVF, toned, bumps and scratches, banker's marks, weight 3.705 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 79 B.C.; obverse head of Juno Sospita right, clad in goat's skin, spindle (control symbol) behind, bead and reel border, bankers marks under ear and to right; reverse Griffin leaping right, distaff (control symbol) below, L·PAPI in exergue, bead and reel border; $400.00 (€328.00)


Lesbos, 5th - 4th Century B.C.

|Lesbos|, |Lesbos,| |5th| |-| |4th| |Century| |B.C.||1/3| |stater|
The specific satrap has not been confirmed.
SL95876. Billon 1/3 stater, BMC Lesbos 58, pl. XXXI, 3; SNG Cop -; Winzer -, NGC VG, Strike 4/5; Surface 2/5 (5872605-037), weight 3.90 g, maximum diameter 14 mm, die axis 225o, uncertain Lesbos mint, 5th - 4th Century B.C.; obverse youthful male head (satrap?) left, wearing tight-fitting cap; reverse head of roaring lion left within incuse square; NGC| Lookup; extremely rare; $250.00 (€205.00)


Gallic Celts, Carnutes, Beauce Area, c. 41 - 30 B.C.

|Celtic| |&| |Tribal|, |Gallic| |Celts,| |Carnutes,| |Beauce| |Area,| |c.| |41| |-| |30| |B.C.||piastre|
The helmeted bust on the obverse is derived from that of Minerva on the Roman Republic denarius of C. Vibius Varus, 42 B.C. (Crawford 494/38, Sydenham 1140).
CE89589. Bronze piastre, CCBM III 119, De la Tour 7105, Delestrée-Tache 2473, Scheers S-M 324 ff., Blanchet 274, aVF, green patina with darker fields, some bumps and scratches, light corrosion, weight 2.923 g, maximum diameter 16.2 mm, die axis 270o, c. 41 - 30 B.C.; obverse PIXTILOS, helmeted head left, the neck adorned with a torque, branch left, ornaments above; reverse PIXTILOS, lion running left, tail curled above the back, two ringed pellets above, stylized bird right below; ex CGB Numismatique Paris; scarce; $180.00 (€147.60)


Philip II, July or August 247 - Late 249 A.D., Zeugma, Commagene, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Philip| |II,| |July| |or| |August| |247| |-| |Late| |249| |A.D.,| |Zeugma,| |Commagene,| |Syria||AE| |27|
Zeugma was founded by Seleucus I Nicator who almost certainly named the city Seleucia after himself. In 64 B.C. the city was conquered by Rome and renamed Zeugma, meaning "bridge of boats." On the Silk Road connecting Antioch to China, Zeugma had a pontoon bridge across the Euphrates, which was the long time border with the Persian Empire. The Legio IV Scythica was camped in Zeugma. The legion and the trade station brought great wealth to Zeugma until, in 256, Zeugma was fully destroyed by the Sassanid king, Shapur I. An earthquake then buried the city beneath rubble. The city never regained its earlier prosperity and, after Arab raids in the 5th and 6th centuries, it was abandoned again.
SL89808. Bronze AE 27, Butcher 31c; SNG Cop 35; BMC Galatia p. 128, 35; SGICV 4142, NGC Ch VF, strike 5/5, surface 3/5 (4094544-007), weight 15.63 g, maximum diameter 27.4 mm, die axis 0o, Zeugma (Belkis, Turkey) mint, 247 - 249 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ZEYΓMATEΩN, tetrastyle temple with peribolos enclosing the sacred grove of trees, below Capricorn right; from the Martineit Collection of Ancient and World Coins, NGC| Lookup; $180.00 (€147.60)


Eumeneia, Phrygia, c. 244 - 249 A.D.

|Eumeneia|, |Eumeneia,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |244| |-| |249| |A.D.||AE| |23|
Eumenia, Phrygia was founded by Attalus II Philadelphus (159 - 138 B.C.) at the source of the Cludrus, near the Glaucus, and named after his brother Eumenes. Numerous inscriptions and many coins remain to show that Eumenia was an important and prosperous city under Roman rule. As early as the third century its population was in great part Christian, and it seems to have suffered much during the persecution of Diocletian. The remains of Eumenia are located in Denizli Province, Turkey on the shore of Lake Isikli near Civril.
RP97255. Bronze AE 23, RPC Online VIII U20608 (8 spec., 2 var.); BMC Phrygia p. 214, 24; Lindgren III 583; SNG Cop 389 var. (leg. from upper r.); SNGvA 3586 var. (same), VF, green patina, rough areas, scattered porosity, weight 7.002 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 180o, Eumeneia (near Civril, Turkey) mint, reign of Philip I, c. 244 - 249 A.D.; obverse •IEPA• CVNKΛHTOC (clockwise from the lower left), bare-headed, draped bust of the Senate right; reverse EVMENEΩ-N AXAIΩN, cult image of Artemis Ephesia standing facing, wearing kalathos and veil, with arm supports, between two stags standing facing outward with heads turned back towards the goddess; ex Savoca Numismatik, silver auction 82 (26 Jul 2020), lot 247; this coin is the primary plate coin for the type in RPC Online VIII; rare; $170.00 (€139.40)


Lot of 4 Silver Fractions From Phoenicia, c. 425 - 300 B.C.

|Phoenicia|, |Lot| |of| |4| |Silver| |Fractions| |From| |Phoenicia,| |c.| |425| |-| |300| |B.C.||Lot|
 
GA97055. Silver Lot, 4 silver fractions, c. 0.6g - 0.8g, c. 9mm, $160.00 (€131.20)


Lampsakos, Mysia, c. Late 3rd Century B.C.

|Lampsakos|, |Lampsakos,| |Mysia,| |c.| |Late| |3rd| |Century| |B.C.||AE| |13|
From the Errett Bishop Collection.

Lampsakos was founded by Greek colonists from Phocaea in the 6th century B.C. Soon afterward it became a main competitor of Miletus, controlling the trade roots in the Dardanelles. During the 6th and 5th centuries B.C., Lampsacus was successively dominated by Lydia, Persia, Athens, and Sparta. Artaxerxes I assigned it to Themistocles with the expectation that the city supply the Persian king with its famous wine. When Lampsacus joined the Delian League after the battle of Mycale in 479 B.C., it paid a tribute of twelve talents, a testimony to its wealth.
GB93592. Bronze AE 13, cf. Baldwin Lampsakos plate IX 19-21; BMC Mysia p. 85, 65, Weber 5123, gF, rough green patina, scratches, weight 1.701 g, maximum diameter 13.2 mm, die axis 90o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, c. late 3rd century B.C.; obverse laureate bearded head Poseidon right; reverse ΛAM, forepart of Pegasos right, dolphin right below; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $150.00 (€123.00)


Roman Republic, C. Marius C.f. Capito, 81 B.C.

|99-50| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |C.| |Marius| |C.f.| |Capito,| |81| |B.C.||denarius| |serratus|NEW
Plowing with a yoke of oxen usually symbolized colonization. The ceremonial founding of a colony included plowing a furrow, the pomerium, a sacred boundary, around the site of the new city. For this issue, the control numbers are always the same on both sides.
RR98678. Silver denarius serratus, BMCRR I Rome 2884 (hound), Crawford 378/1c (horse), Sydenham 744b, RSC I Maria 9, SRCV I 300, F, toned, porous, scratches, banker's marks, punch on rev., slightly off center, weight 3.427 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 81 B.C.; obverse CAPIT• CXXXV (135, control number), draped bust of Ceres right, wreathed with grain, CXXXV (135, control number) above, running horse or hound (control symbol) below chin; reverse plowman conducting yoke of two oxen left (priest plowing pomerium), CXXXV (135, control number) above, C•MARI•C•F / S•C in two lines in exergue; $150.00 (€123.00)


Syracuse, Sicily, Agathokles, 317 - 289 B.C.

|Syracuse|, |Syracuse,| |Sicily,| |Agathokles,| |317| |-| |289| |B.C.||AE| |17|
With an army of mercenaries, through deceit, and after banishing or murdering some 10,000 citizens, Agathocles made himself master of Syracuse and later most of Sicily. Machiavelli wrote of him, "It cannot be called prowess to kill fellow-citizens, to betray friends, to be treacherous, pitiless, and irreligious" and cited him as an example of "those who by their crimes come to be princes." According to the historian Justin, very early in life Agathocles parlayed his remarkable beauty into a career as a prostitute, first for men, and later, after puberty, for women, and then made a living by robbery before becoming a soldier and marrying a rich widow.
GI96864. Bronze AE 17, Calciati II p. 225, 99 R41; cf. BMC Sicily p. 195, 370 (controls); SNG ANS 603 (controls); HGC 2 1489, SNG Cop -, aVF, beautiful style, nice green patina, some corrosion/pitting, earthen deposits, light marks, edge crack, weight 3.403 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 180o, Syracuse mint, 317 - 310 B.C.; obverse ΣYPAKOΣIΩN, head of Kore left, wreathed with grain, wreath (control symbol) behind neck; reverse bull butting left, dolphin above, monogram in wreath (control) in exergue; $130.00 (€106.60)




  



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