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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Galatia||View Options:  |  |  | 

Galatia

Galatia was named for Gauls from Thrace who settled there and became its ruling caste following the Gallic invasion of the Balkans in 279 B.C. The local Cappadocian population was left in control of the towns and most of the land, paying tithes to the new military aristocracy who kept aloof in fortified farmsteads, surrounded by their bands. These Celtic warriors were often hired as mercenary soldiers, sometimes fighting on both sides in the great battles of the times. For decades their war bands ravaged western Asia Minor. About 232 B.C. the Hellenized cities united under king Attalus I of Pergamum, defeated them, and forced them to confine themselves to Galatia. The Galatians were defeated by Rome in 189 B.C. and became a client state of Rome in 64 B.C. During his second missionary journey, St. Paul of Tarsus visited Galatia, where he was detained by sickness (Galatians 4:13). The Galatians were still speaking their language (Gaulish) in the 4th century A.D. Galatia

Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Parion, Mysia(?)

|Parium|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Parion,| |Mysia(?)||AE| |15|
The attribution of this very rare type to Parium is uncertain. See RPC II p. 137.

The ceremonial founding of a new Roman colony included plowing a furrow, the pomerium, a sacred boundary, around the site of the new city.
RP94451. Bronze AE 15, RPC II Online 889 (12 spec.), SNGvA 6202, F, dark brown patina, light corrosion, tight flan, weight 3.575 g, maximum diameter 15.3 mm, die axis 0o, Parion, Mysia(?) mint, 13 Sep 81 - 18 Sep 96 A.D.; obverse DO-MIT AVG (clockwise from the upper right), laureate head left; reverse priest plowing right with two oxen, marking the pomerium (sacred boundary marked for the foundation of a new Roman colony), GERM in exergue; zero sales of this type recorded on Coin Archives in the last two decades; very rare; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Titus and Domitian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Claudiolaodicea Combusta, Lycaonia

|Lycaonia|, |Titus| |and| |Domitian,| |1| |July| |69| |-| |24| |June| |79| |A.D.,| |Claudiolaodicea| |Combusta,| |Lycaonia||AE| |19|
Claudiolaodicea, founded by Seleucus I Nicator, was one of five cities he named after his mother Laodice. Restored by Claudius in the 1st century A.D., it was renamed Claudiolaodicea in his honor. Its Latin epithet Combusta indicates it was once destroyed by fire. Located northwest of Iconium (now Konya), on the high road from the west coast to Melitene on the Euphrates, it is now Ladik, Konya Province, Turkey. Some ancient authors describe it as located in Lycaonia, others in Pisidia, and Ptolemy places it in Galatia. This discrepancy is easily explained because these territories were often extended or reduced and the city was likely in each of them at one time. The few imperial coins of Claudiolaodicea all belong to the reigns of Titus and Domitian.
RP97865. Bronze AE 19, SNGvA 152 (same dies), RPC Online II 1613 (14 spec.), vA Lykien 151 - 153, SNG BnF 2322, Waddington 4779, F, earthen adhesions, weight 6.794 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea Catacecaumene (Ladik, Turkey) mint, as caesars under Vespasian, 69 - 79 A.D.; obverse TITOC KAI ∆OMITIANOC KAICAPEC, confronted bare heads Titus (on left) and Domitian; reverse KΛAY∆IOΛAO∆IKEWN, Cybele seated left on high-backed throne, kalathos on head, patera in right hand, resting left arm on tympanum, lion couchant left on near side of throne; scarce; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Galba, 3 April 68 - 15 January 69 A.D., Koinon of Galatia

|Galatia|, |Galba,| |3| |April| |68| |-| |15| |January| |69| |A.D.,| |Koinon| |of| |Galatia||AE| |21|
RP63431. Bronze AE 21, RPC I 3566 (citing only 2 examples); c/m: Howgego 348 (5 pcs), F, weight 6.918 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 0o, obverse ΓAΛBAC CEBACTOC, bare head left, c/m: owl standing right in circular punch; reverse CEBACTWN, hexastyle temple, pellet in center intercolumniation, shield in pediment; rare type and countermark; ex CNG auction 206; lot 343, ex D. Alighieri Collection; SOLD


Nero and Poppaea, 62 - 65 A.D., Koinon Galatia, Galatia

|Nero|, |Nero| |and| |Poppaea,| |62| |-| |65| |A.D.,| |Koinon| |Galatia,| |Galatia||AE| |26|
Poppaea was renowned for her beauty and voluptuous extravagance. In 62 A.D., Nero divorced his wife Octavia to marry Poppaea. According to Tacitus, Poppaea married Otho only to get close to Nero and then, in turn, became Nero's favorite mistress, and then wife. She bore Nero one daughter, Claudia Augusta, born 21 January 63, who died at only four months of age. At the birth of Claudia, Nero honored mother and child with the title of Augusta. According to Suetonius, one day in the summer of 65, Poppaea quarreled fiercely with Nero over his spending too much time at the races. She was pregnant with her second child. In a fit of rage, Nero kicked her in the abdomen, killing her.
SH42882. Bronze AE 26, RPC I 3562, SNG BnF 2400, SNGvA 6117, SGICV 662, aVF, weight 16.654 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 45o, Tavium(?) mint, 62 - 65 A.D.; obverse NEPΩNOΣ ΣEBAΣTOY, laureate head of Nero right; reverse ΠOΠΠIAΣ ΣEBAΣTHΣ, draped bust of Poppaea right; SOLD







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REFERENCES|

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Arslan, M. "The Roman Coinage of Ancyra in Galatia" in Nomismata 1 (1997).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (London, 1992 - ).
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Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of Northern and Central Anatolia, Pontos, Paphlagonia, Bithynia, Phrygia, Galatia, Lykaonia, and Kappadokia...Fifth to First Centuries BC. HGC 7. (Lancaster, PA, 2012).
Imhoof-Blumer, F. Zur griechischen und rmischen Mnzkunde. (Geneva, 1908).
Lindgren, H. & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coins of Asia Minor and the Levant. (San Mateo, 1985).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Mionnet, T. Description de Mdailles antiques grecques et romaines, Vol. IV. (Paris, 1809).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2: Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Volume 7: Cyprus to India. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Mnzsammlung Universitt Tbingen, |Part 6: Phrygien-Kappadokien; Rmische Provinzprgungen in Kleinasien. (Berlin, 1998).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock, Vol. 3: Pisidia, Lycaonia, Cilicia, Galatia, Cappadocia, Cyprus, [etc.]. (Berlin, 1964).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Cabinet des Mdailles, Bibliothque Nationale, Vol. 3: Pamphylia, Pisidia, Lycaonia, Galatia. (Paris, 1994).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, sterreich, Sammlung Leypold, Kleinasiatische Mnzen der Kaiserzeit. Vol. II: Phrygia - Commagene. (Vienna, 2004).
Wroth, W. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Galatia, Cappadocia, and Syria. (London, 1899).

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