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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Republic||View Options:  |  |  | 

Coins of the Roman Republic
Roman Republic and Central Italy, Cast Aes Rude, c. 5th - 4th Century B.C., 20 Fragments

|before| |211| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic| |and| |Central| |Italy,| |Cast| |Aes| |Rude,| |c.| |5th| |-| |4th| |Century| |B.C.,| |20| |Fragments||Lot|
In Italy, as with other nations, early trade used a system of barter. Aes rude (Latin: "rough bronze"), used perhaps as early as the early 8th century B.C., was the earliest metal proto-currency in central Italy. In the 5th century B.C., bronze replaced cattle as the primary measure of value in trade. Aes rude are rough lumpy bronze ingots with no marks or design, some are flat and oblong, others are square, while many are irregular and shapeless. The metal is mostly copper with roughly 5% tin. Weight varies considerably with some exceeding twelve pounds and others under an ounce. Many smaller examples are fragments of broken larger specimens. A balance was necessary to measure value for commercial transactions.
LT96143. Bronze Lot, Lot of 20 aes rude fragments, cf. BMCRR I p. 1, Haeberlin pl. 1, Vecchi ICC pl. 1, Thurlow-Vecchi pl. 2, SRCV I 505, 13.908g - 65.836g, no tags or flips, actual pieces in the photograph, as-is, no returns; $450.00 (€369.00)


Roman Republic, L. Papius, 79 B.C.

|99-50| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |L.| |Papius,| |79| |B.C.||denarius| |serratus|NEW
In Roman mythology, Juno was the daughter of Saturn and the wife of Jupiter and she had many attributes. Among these was Juno Sospita, who offered protection to women, accompanying them throughout their lives from birth to death. Women called upon her to aid in conception. Juno Sospita was characterized by her goatskin coat and headdress with the horns of a goat. The control marks on this type are normally paired related symbols. Each pair has only one set of dies.
RR98392. Silver denarius serratus, BMCRR I 3070 (same controls); Crawford 384/1, pl. LXVI 94; Sydenham 773; RSC I Papia 1; SRCV I 311, aVF, toned, bumps and scratches, banker's marks, weight 3.705 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 79 B.C.; obverse head of Juno Sospita right, clad in goat's skin, spindle (control symbol) behind, bead and reel border, bankers marks under ear and to right; reverse Griffin leaping right, distaff (control symbol) below, L·PAPI in exergue, bead and reel border; $400.00 (€328.00)


Roman Republic and Central Italy, Cast Aes Rude, c. 5th - 4th Century B.C., 8 Fragments

|before| |211| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic| |and| |Central| |Italy,| |Cast| |Aes| |Rude,| |c.| |5th| |-| |4th| |Century| |B.C.,| |8| |Fragments||Lot|
In Italy, as with other nations, early trade used a system of barter. Aes rude (Latin: "rough bronze"), used perhaps as early as the early 8th century B.C., was the earliest metal proto-currency in central Italy. In the 5th century B.C., bronze replaced cattle as the primary measure of value in trade. Aes rude are rough lumpy bronze ingots with no marks or design, some are flat and oblong, others are square, while many are irregular and shapeless. The metal is mostly copper with roughly 5% tin. Weight varies considerably with some exceeding twelve pounds and others under an ounce. Many smaller examples are fragments of broken larger specimens. A balance was necessary to measure value for commercial transactions.
LT96230. Bronze Lot, Lot of 8 aes rude fragments, cf. BMCRR I p. 1, Haeberlin pl. 1, Vecchi ICC pl. 1, Thurlow-Vecchi pl. 2, SRCV I 505, weight 28.533g - 62.227g, no tags or flips, actual pieces in the photograph, as-is, no returns; $250.00 (€205.00)


Roman Republic, C. Marius C.f. Capito, 81 B.C.

|99-50| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |C.| |Marius| |C.f.| |Capito,| |81| |B.C.||denarius| |serratus|NEW
Plowing with a yoke of oxen usually symbolized colonization. The ceremonial founding of a colony included plowing a furrow, the pomerium, a sacred boundary, around the site of the new city. For this issue, the control numbers are always the same on both sides.
RR98678. Silver denarius serratus, BMCRR I Rome 2884 (hound), Crawford 378/1c (horse), Sydenham 744b, RSC I Maria 9, SRCV I 300, F, toned, porous, scratches, banker's marks, punch on rev., slightly off center, weight 3.427 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 81 B.C.; obverse CAPIT• CXXXV (135, control number), draped bust of Ceres right, wreathed with grain, CXXXV (135, control number) above, running horse or hound (control symbol) below chin; reverse plowman conducting yoke of two oxen left (priest plowing pomerium), CXXXV (135, control number) above, C•MARI•C•F / S•C in two lines in exergue; $150.00 (€123.00)


Roman Republic, Anonymous, Second Punic War, 211 - 206 B.C.

|211-100| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Anonymous,| |Second| |Punic| |War,| |211| |-| |206| |B.C.||as|
Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, beginnings and endings. He is most often depicted as having two faces or heads, facing in opposite directions. Janus is believed to be one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.
RR88221. Bronze as, Crawford 56/2, Sydenham 143, BMCRR Rome 373 ff., SRCV I 627, F, green patina, crack, porous, weight 29.386 g, maximum diameter 33.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 211 - 206 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Janus, I (mark of value) above, countermark: head right in round punch; reverse war galley prow right, I (mark of value) above, ROMA in exergue; ex Moneta Numismatic Services; $100.00 (€82.00)


Osco-Latin, Central Italy, Cast Aes Formatum, Late 4th - Early 3rd Century B.C., Bipod Shell

|Italy|, |Osco-Latin,| |Central| |Italy,| |Cast| |Aes| |Formatum,| |Late| |4th| |-| |Early| |3rd| |Century| |B.C.,| |Bipod| |Shell||Aes| |Formatum|
 
GA96779. Cast bronze Aes Formatum, cf. Fallai IAPN 8, pl. 6, 2-2c; Alvarez-Burgos P28; Thurlow-Vecchi -, Fair, weight 13.617 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, uncertain Osco-Latin mint, late 4th - early 3rd century B.C.; cast from a bipod shell; $80.00 (€65.60)


Roman Republic, Anonymous (Unofficial?), c. 91 B.C.

|99-50| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Anonymous| |(Unofficial?),| |c.| |91| |B.C.||quadrans|
Russo suspects this type may be unofficial because, despite the attractive style, the prow does not include the usual features found on most coins of the period.
RR88352. Copper quadrans, Russo RBW 1244 (unofficial?), Crawford 339/4a, Sydenham 679c, BMCRR Rome 2208, SRCV I 1195, VF, porous, rough, edge splits, weight 2.114 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 180o, unofficial(?) mint, c. 169 - 91 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right, wearing Nemean Lion scalp headdress, three pellets behind; reverse prow right, apotropaic on side, ROMA above, three pellets below; $65.00 (€53.30)










REFERENCES|

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 1: Pompey to Domitian. (Paris, 1880).
Crawford, M. Roman Republican Coinage. (Cambridge, 1974).
Grueber, H.A. Coins of the Roman Republic in The British Museum. (London, 1910).
Haeberlin, E. J. Aes Grave. Das Schwergeld Roms und Mittelitaliens. (Frankfurt, 1910).
Rutter, N.K. ed. Historia Numorum. Italy. (London, 2001).
Seaby, H.A., D. Sear, & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Volume I, The Republic to Augustus. (London, 1989).
Sear, D. R. The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators 49 - 27 BC. (London, 1998).
Sear, D. R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume One, The Republic and the Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Stannard, C. The local coinages of Central Italy in the late Roman Republic: provisional catalogue, Oct 2007.
Sydenham, E. Aes Grave, a Study of the Cast Coinages of Rome and Central Italy. (London, 1926).
Sydenham, E. The Coinage of the Roman Republic. (London, 1952).
Thurlow, B. and I. Vecchi. Italian Cast Coinage. (Dorchester, 1979).

Catalog current as of Thursday, January 20, 2022.
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