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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Republic||View Options:  |  |  |   

Coins of the Roman Republic
Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D.

|Augustus|, |Augustus,| |16| |January| |27| |B.C.| |-| |19| |August| |14| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Honos was the Roman god personifying honor. He was closely associated with Virtus, the goddess of manliness, or bravery, and the two are frequently depicted together. Honos is typically shown wearing a wreath of bay leaves, while Virtus is identified by her helmet.
SH95113. Silver denarius, RSC I 429, RIC I 313, BMCRE I 55, BnF I 196, Choice EF, attractive style, nice toning, well centered, banker's mark on cheek, thin flan cracks on reverse, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.894 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 90o, Italian (Rome?) mint, moneyer M. Durmius, 19 - 18 B.C.; obverse M DVRMIVS III VIR HONORI, bare head of Honos right, with idealized features of Augustus; reverse CAESAR AVGVSTVS, slow quadriga right, modius-shaped car, three grain ears on top, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; ex Superior Galleries, The Moreira Sale, part 2 (10-11 Oct 1988), part of lot 2305; very rare; $1900.00 SALE |PRICE| $1700.00


Roman Republic, First Triumvirate, A. Plautius, c. 55 B.C.

|99-50| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |First| |Triumvirate,| |A.| |Plautius,| |c.| |55| |B.C.|, |denarius|
In 67 B.C., Aristobulus II rebelled against his older brother Hyrcanus II, the king of Judaea. Both brothers appealed to Pompey's deputy Marcus Aemilius Scaurus, who, bribed by a gift of 400 talents, decided in favor of Aristobulus. When Pompey arrived in Syria in 63 B.C., both brothers sent delegates to Damascus, but Pompey did not make an immediate decision. Aristobulus' followers refused to open the gates of Jerusalem and Romans forces besieged and captured the city. Pompey deemed Hyrcanus II, the elder, weaker brother a more reliable ally. Hyrcanus was restored as high priest, but not as king. Aristobulus was taken to Rome as a prisoner. In 57 B.C. Aristobulus escaped to Judaea and instigated another rebellion. A young cavalry commander, Marc Antony, led several men to scale Aristobulus' fortifications leading to his recapture. At the time this coin was struck in 55 B.C., Aristobulus was a prisoner in Rome. Julius Caesar released him in 49 B.C., hoping to turn Judaea against Pompey, but on his way to Judaea he was poisoned by a Pompey supporter. With help from the Parthians, Aristobulus' son Antigonus rebelled against Rome and became king in 40 B.C. He was defeated by Rome and killed in 37 B.C.

This special issue was struck by an Aedile Curule. Aediles supervised public works and staged games. Since this issue bears turreted Cybele, we may speculate it was to finance a building project.
RR94469. Silver denarius, Crawford 431/1, Sydenham 932, RSC I Plautia 13, BMCRR Rome 3916, Russo RBW 1540, SRCV I 395, Choice gVF, well centered on a broad flan, light tone on mint luster, areas of weak strike, light marks, weight 3.867 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 55 B.C.; obverse AED CVR S C downwards on left, A PLAVTIVS downwards on right, turreted head of Cybele right, wearing cruciform earring, hair rolled and in knot at the back, locks falling down neck; reverse Bacchius Judaeus (Aristobulus II High Priest and King of Judaea) kneeling right, with left hand holding reins of camel standing right on his far side, raising olive branch in right hand, IVDAEVS upward on right, BACCHIVS in exergue; from an Israeli collection, ex Mnzzentrum Rheinland, auction 177 (14 Sep 2016), lot 304; $450.00 SALE |PRICE| $405.00


Luceria, Apulia, Italy, c. 211 - 200 B.C.

|Italy|, |Luceria,| |Apulia,| |Italy,| |c.| |211| |-| |200| |B.C.|, |uncia|
In 321 B.C., the Romans, deceived into thinking Lucera was under siege by the Samnites, walked into an ambush and were defeated. The town threw out the Samnites, sought Roman protection, and in 320 B.C. was granted the status of Colonia Togata, which meant it was ruled by the Roman Senate. To strengthen ties, 2,500 Romans moved to Lucera. Roman culture merged with the native one slowly, probably accompanied by cross-cultural marriages, but Lucera was a steadfast supporter of Rome. By the 2nd century B.C., the rustic town was transformed into a proper Roman city with houses, public buildings, paved roads, sidewalks and services for travelers, accommodation for livestock with running water, and warehouses for storing goods.
GB86125. Bronze uncia, SNG ANS 709; SNG Cop 663; SNG BnF 1368; SNG Munchen 504; HN Italy 682; BMC Italy p. 141, 62; Hunterian -, VF, rough, weight 4.084 g, maximum diameter 14.9 mm, die axis 0o, Luceria mint, c. 211 - 200 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, bow and quiver at shoulder, pellet behind; reverse LOVC-ERI, toad seen from above; very rare; $380.00 SALE |PRICE| $342.00


Julius Caesar, Imperator and Dictator, October 49 - 15 March 44 B.C., Minted by Praefectus C. Clovius

|Julius| |Caesar|, |Julius| |Caesar,| |Imperator| |and| |Dictator,| |October| |49| |-| |15| |March| |44| |B.C.,| |Minted| |by| |Praefectus| |C.| |Clovius|, |dupondius|
On 17 March 45 B.C., in his last victory, Julius Caesar defeated the Pompeian forces of Titus Labienus and Pompey the younger in the Battle of Munda. Labienus died in battle, Pompey the younger was executed, but Sextus Pompey escaped to take command of the remnants of the Pompeian fleet.
RR94484. Bronze dupondius, Sear CRI 62, BMCRR I 4125, Crawford 476/1a, RPC I 601, Sydenham 1025, RBW Collection 1667, SRCV I 1417, gF/VF, dark brown patina, porous, areas of corrosion, weight 11.619 g, maximum diameter 27.7 mm, die axis 0o, Italian (Rome or Mediolanum?) mint, late 46 - early 45 B.C.; obverse CAESAR DIC TER (Dictator for the third time), draped bust of winged Victory right; reverse C CLOVI PRAEF (C. Clovius, praefectus), Minerva standing left, trophy over right shoulder, shield decorated with Gorgoneion (facing head of Medusa) in left hand, snake at feet left; from an Israeli collection; $360.00 SALE |PRICE| $324.00


Roman Republic, Q. Pomponius Musa, 66 B.C.

|99-50| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Q.| |Pomponius| |Musa,| |66| |B.C.|, |denarius|
Many of the Roman moneyers had a solid sense of humor and word play with homonyms was very popular. Pomponius Musa, playing on his name, issued ten types each depicting Hercules Musagetes (Conductor of the Muses) or one of nine different Muses, creating one of the most interesting and sought after series of the Republican coinage. This coin depicts Urania, the Muse of Astronomy.
RR94286. Silver denarius, Crawford 410/8, Sydenham 823, RSC I Pomponia 22, RBW Collection 1488, SRCV I 359, gF, banker's marks, a little off center, weight 3.683 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 66 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, star behind; reverse MVSA on left, Q POMPONI on right, Urania, Muse of Astronomy standing left, pointing with rod in right hand at globe on tripod-stand; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 77 (5 May 2019), lot 601; $280.00 SALE |PRICE| $252.00


The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators 49-27 B.C.

|Roman| |Books|, |The| |History| |and| |Coinage| |of| |the| |Roman| |Imperators| |49-27| |B.C.|,
THE HISTORY AND COINAGE OF THE ROMAN IMPERATORS 49-27 BC by David Sear

The brief period covered in this book witnessed the violent transition of the Roman state from a republican constitution, presided over by the Senate, to a full military autocracy under the control of one man, the Emperor Augustus. In reality, the events of these years were merely the culmination of a movement which had been gathering strength over the preceding half-century, since the rise of men such as Marius and Sulla. Caesar had put events into motion by his invasion of Italy and his challenge to Pompey's dominant position in Roman politics. With his assassination on the Ides of March, 44 B.C., Caesar's role was inherited by his youthful great-nephew Octavian who, against seemingly hopeless odds, succeeded in eliminating his rivals for supreme power, notably Mark Antony and his ambitious consort Cleopatra, queen of Egypt. This book traces in detail the unfolding of this drama. Each of its six chapters includes a comprehensive catalogue listing of all the relevant coin types and varieties, each with a full discussion of its significance in the interpretation of the events of the period. Information on the rarity of each type, including estimates of current value, is presented in a separate table. The numerous, though less precisely understood, local coinages of the Imperatorial period are listed in an extensive appendix. Whilst providing a comprehensive numismatic reference work for the age of transition from Republic to Empire the author has also aimed to heighten the historian's awareness of the vital role which may be played by the numismatic evidence in the detailed chronicling of event.
BK43171. The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators 49-27 B.C. by David R. Sear, a detailed survey including valuations for collectors, 1998, 360 pages, illustrated throughout, hardback; $140.00 SALE |PRICE| $126.00 Out of Stock!


Roman Republic, L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus, 62 B.C.

|99-50| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |L.| |Aemilius| |Lepidus| |Paullus,| |62| |B.C.|, |denarius|
At the end of the Third Macedonian War (171 - 168 B.C.), King Perseus of Macedonia was decisively defeated by Rome at the Battle of Pydna. He surrendered to general Lucius Aemilius Paullus and was imprisoned in Rome with his half-brother Philippus and his son Alexander. The Antigonid kingdom was replaced with four republics, which were later dissolved and became the Roman province of Macedonia.
RR92948. Silver denarius, RSC I Aemilia 10, Crawford 415/1, Sydenham 926, RBW Collection 1497, BMCRR I Rome 3373, SRCV I 366, Choice F, well centered, round punch on obverse, toned, light marks and scratches, weight 3.754 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 62 B.C.; obverse PAVLLVS LEPIDVS CONCORDIA, veiled and diademed head of Concordia right; reverse Paullus on right, standing left, togate, with right hand touching trophy of captured arms in center; on the left, three standing bound captives: King Perseus of Macedonia, his half-brother, and his son, TER above PAVLLVS in exergue; $140.00 SALE |PRICE| $126.00


Roman Republic, Anonymous, 211 - 206 B.C.

|before| |150| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Anonymous,| |211| |-| |206| |B.C.|, |as|
Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, beginnings and endings. He is most often depicted as having two faces or heads, facing in opposite directions. Janus is believed to be one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.
RR88221. Bronze as, Crawford 56/2, Sydenham 143, BMCRR Rome 373 ff., SRCV I 627, F, green patina, crack, porous, weight 29.386 g, maximum diameter 33.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 211 - 206 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Janus, I (mark of value) above, countermark: head right in round punch; reverse war galley prow right, I (mark of value) above, ROMA in exergue; ex Moneta Numismatic Services; $130.00 SALE |PRICE| $117.00


Roman Republic, Unofficial, c. 169 - 91 B.C.

|before| |150| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Unofficial,| |c.| |169| |-| |91| |B.C.|, |quadrans|
Crawford notes, "The very common quadrantes with M and N (as Milan 351) are clearly unofficial."
RR79715. Copper quadrans, cf. Milan 351 (from Crawford appendix p. 309 unofficial issues of bronze coins), Sydenham -, VF, centered on a tight flan, light marks,, weight 4.182 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 135o, unofficial mint, c. 169 - 91 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right, wearing Nemean Lion scalp headdress, three pellets behind; reverse prow right, ROMA below, three pellets before, M above; ex Forum (2006), ex Goodman collection; $125.00 SALE |PRICE| $113.00


Roman Republic, Cn. Gellius, c. 138 B.C.

|150-100| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Cn.| |Gellius,| |c.| |138| |B.C.|, |quadrans|
In 138 B.C., Tautalus, chieftain of the proto-Celtic Lusitanian tribe from western Hispania, surrendered to the Romans. An Iberian town by the river Turia was refounded as the Roman colony Valentia Edetanorum and about two thousand Roman colonists settled there.
RR92994. Bronze quadrans, Crawford 232/4, Sydenham 435b (very scarce), BMCRR I Rome 923, RBW Collection 966, SRCV I 1139, gF, tight flan, earthen deposits, scratches, weight 5.334 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 138 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right, wearing Nemean lion-skin headdress, three pellets (mark of value) behind; reverse prow right, CN. GEL above, ROMA in exergue; very scarce; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00




  






REFERENCES|

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 1: Pompey to Domitian. (Paris, 1880).
Crawford, M. Roman Republican Coinage. (Cambridge, 1974).
Grueber, H.A. Coins of the Roman Republic in The British Museum. (London, 1910).
Haeberlin, E. J. Aes Grave. Das Schwergeld Roms und Mittelitaliens. (Frankfurt, 1910).
Rutter, N.K. ed. Historia Numorum. Italy. (London, 2001).
Seaby, H.A., D. Sear, & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Volume I, The Republic to Augustus. (London, 1989).
Sear, D. R. The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators 49 - 27 BC. (London, 1998).
Sear, D. R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume One, The Republic and the Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Stannard, C. The local coinages of Central Italy in the late Roman Republic: provisional catalogue, Oct 2007.
Sydenham, E. Aes Grave, a Study of the Cast Coinages of Rome and Central Italy. (London, 1926).
Sydenham, E. The Coinage of the Roman Republic. (London, 1952).
Thurlow, B. and I. Vecchi. Italian Cast Coinage. (Dorchester, 1979).

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