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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Phrygia| ▸ |Other Phrygia||View Options:  |  |  | 

Ancient Greek Coins of Phrygia

Phrygia lies in western central Anatolia (Asia Minor) between Bithynia, Mysia, Lydia, Pisidia, and Galatia. The cities were found in the valleys and high plains between the many high mountains of the land. The native Phrygians, whose inscriptions have not yet been deciphered, fell under Lydian, then Persian, then Macedonian rule. Greek and Macedonian settlers were planted in Phrygia by the Seleucids and Attalids in a mutual rivalry, but northern Phrygia was overrun by Celts (eventually it would become Galatia). After the defeat of Antiochus at Magnesia, Phrygia was assigned to the kingdom of Pergamum in 188 B.C., after which it became intensely Hellenized and first struck coins. Rome took control, along with the rest of the Pergamene kingdom, in 133 B.C.

Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D., Cotiaeum, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Valerian| |I,| |October| |253| |-| |c.| |June| |260| |A.D.,| |Cotiaeum,| |Phrygia||tetrassarion|
Asklepios is the Greek god of medicine. Hygieia is the goddess of health and Asklepios' daughter. Telesphoros is Asklepios' assistant. Asklepios learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
RP110209. Bronze tetrassarion, SNG Hunt 2048; SNG Mu 333 var. (rev. leg.); SNG Cop 337 var. (same) BMC Phrygia p. 177, 94 var. (bust); SNGvA 3791 var. (Telesphoros in center), VF, dark near black patina, light deposits, near centered, die wear, small rev. die crack/breaks, weight 7.089 g, maximum diameter 25.1 mm, die axis 195o, Cotiaeum (Kutahya, Turkey) mint, Oct 253 - c. Jun 260 A.D.; obverse AVT K Π ΛIK OVAΛEPIANON, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse EΠ Π AIΛ ∆HMHETPIANOY IΠ (P. Ailios Demetrios hipparchos, HM ligate), Hygieia, on left, standing right, feeding serpent in right hand from patera in left hand; Asklepios, on right, standing facing, head left, leaning with right hand on serpent-entwined staff; AP/X (archon) in two lines above center, KOTIAEΩN (ΩN ligate) in exergue; $125.00 (126.25)


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Ococlea, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Gordian| |III,| |29| |July| |238| |-| |25| |February| |244| |A.D.,| |Ococlea,| |Phrygia||AE| |28|
Ococlea was a city of southern Phrygia, believed to have been in the neighborhood of ancient Metropolis (site near Yenikoy, Turkey). The location of the site is uncertain.
RP110428. Bronze AE 28, RPC VII-1 730/2 (same dies); SNG Leypold II 1699; Waddington 6363; VA Phryg I 717, Choice F, well centered, green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, minor edge splits, weight 10.226 g, maximum diameter 28.0 mm, die axis 180o, Ococlea (near Yenikoy, Turkey) mint, 29 Jul 238 - 25 Feb 244 A.D.; obverse AYT K M AN ΓOR∆IANO-C (Imperator Caesar Marcus Antonius Gordianus), laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front; reverse OKOKΛIEΩN (N reversed), Zeus seated left on throne, himation around hips and legs and over left shoulder, patera in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand; this is the first coin from Ococlea handled by FORVM; rare; $125.00 (126.25)


Cotiaeum, Phrygia, c. 235 - 238 A.D. Diogenes, Archon

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Cotiaeum,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |235| |-| |238| |A.D.| |Diogenes,| |Archon||diassarion|
The image of Demos, the personification of the People, was used on ancient coinage as early as the 5th century B.C. In Roman times, many towns under Roman domination struck pseudo-autonomous coinage depicting either the bust or head of Demos, or showed him standing with the Emperor, Boule (the city council), or the Demos of another city.
RP97257. Bronze diassarion, SNG Cop 318 - 319; BMC Phrygia p. 162, 20, SNGvA 3776, SNG Righetti 1165, Kurth Demos 398, Martin Demos 16, VF, well centered on a broad flan, nice dark green patina, light earthen deposits, light marks, some die wear, weight 7.915 g, maximum diameter 25.8 mm, die axis 0o, Cotiaeum (Ktahya, Turkey) mint, time of Valerian I - Gallienus, c. 235 - 238 A.D.; obverse ∆HMOC (Demos) KOTIAEΩN, diademed bust of the Demos to right, slight drapery over far shoulder; reverse EΠI ∆IOΓENOVC ∆IONVCIOV (struck under Diogenes, son of Dionysios), Zeus seated left on a low backless throne, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, A-PX (archon - Diogenes' title) divided across fields, KOTIAEΩN in exergue; rare; $95.00 (95.95)


Cibyra, Phrygia, 2nd - 3rd Century A.D.

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Cibyra,| |Phrygia,| |2nd| |-| |3rd| |Century| |A.D.||AE| |26|
Nemesis, the winged balancer of life, is the goddess of revenge, the avenger of crimes and punisher of wicked doers. She distributes fortune, good or bad, in due proportion to each according to what is deserved. She often holds a lorum, a long scarf worn by Roman magistrates, to symbolize her authority as judge, and sometimes holds scales and cubit rule to measure each man's just deserts. The wheel of fate sometimes rests against her side. On this coin she holds her adamantine bridles to restrain the frivolous insolences of mortals.
RP110162. Bronze AE 26, SNGvA 3726; SNG Cop 277; BMC Phrygia p. 136, 33, aVF/F, well centered, dark tone, earthen encrustation, weight 10.162 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 180o, Kibyra (near Glhisar, Turkey) mint, 2nd - 3rd Century A.D.; obverse BOYΛH (clockwise from upper right), laureate, veiled, and draped bust of Boule right; reverse KAIC KIBY-PATΩN, Nemesis standing facing, head left, pulling out chiton from her breast with right hand, adamantine bridles in left hand hanging down at side; rare; $80.00 (80.80)


Kibyra, Phrygia, c. 138 - 192 A.D.

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Kibyra,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |138| |-| |192| |A.D.||AE| |21|
Kibyra (Cibyra) near the modern town of Glhisar in south-west Turkey, was possibly originally settled by Lydians. The city was in the far south of Phrygia adjoining Lycia. It is uncertain whether the city was part of the Province of Asia or of Lycia in the early imperial period. According to Strabo, the Lydian language was still being spoken by a multicultural population in the 1st century B.C. Thus Kibyra was the last place where the Lydian culture, by then extinct in Lydia proper, persevered.
RP110161. Bronze AE 21, RPC IV.2 T1953 (10 spec.); Kurth Demos 358; SNG Cop 276; SNGvA 3724; BMC Phrygia p. 135, 25; SNG Mu -; Lindgren -, aVF/VF, dark green patina, rough, porous, earthen deposits, broad flan, weight 6.631 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 180o, Kibyra (near Golhisar, Turkey) mint, c. 138 - 192 A.D.; obverse ∆HMOC (clockwise from upper right), laureate head of Demos right, unbearded; reverse KIBYPATWN, Demeter standing slightly left, head left, wearing long chiton and veil, poppy and grain in right hand, long torch in left hand; rare; $70.00 (70.70)


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Dionysopolis, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Tiberius,| |19| |August| |14| |-| |16| |March| |37| |A.D.,| |Dionysopolis,| |Phrygia||AE| |17|
Dionysiopolis (or Dionysopolis) in Phrygia is mentioned in a letter of M. Cicero to his brother Quintus, in which he speaks of the people of Dionysopolis being very hostile to Quintus, which must have been for something that Quintus did during his praetorship of Asia. Pliny places the Dionysopolitae in the conventus of Apamea, which is all the ancient writers note of their position. We may infer from the coinage that the place was on the Maeander, or near it. Stephanus of Byzantium says that it was founded by Attalus and Eumenes. Stephanus mentions another Dionysopolis in Pontus, originally called Cruni, and he quotes two verses of Scymnus about it; however, he likely meant the town of Dionysopolis in Thrace, on the Pontus, rather than in Pontus. Dionysiopolis was important enough in the late Roman province of Phrygia Pacatiana to become a bishopric, suffragan of its Metropolitan Archbishopric Hierapolis in Phrygia, but was to fade. Its site is tentatively located near modern Bekilli, Turkey.
RP110064. Leaded bronze AE 17, RPC Online I 3120; vA Phryg II 108-20; SNG Cop 349; SNGvA 3538; SNG Fitz 4965; BMC Phrygia 16, F, dark green patina, tight flan, weight 4.641 g, maximum diameter 16.3 mm, die axis 0o, Dionysopolis (near Bekilli, Turkey) mint, 19 Aug 14 - 16 Mar 37 A.D.; obverse ΣEBAΣTOΣ, bare head right; reverse Dionysus standing half left, head left, wearing chiton and himation, grapes in extended right hand, resting on thyrsus vertical in left hand, ∆IONYΣOΠOΛITΩN XAPIΞENOΣ XAP TOY XAP (Charixenos, son of Char[ixenos], grandson of Char[ixenos]) in four downward lines, both XAP ligate; $60.00 (60.60)







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REFERENCES

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