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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Phrygia| ▸ |Other Phrygia||View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Greek Coins of Phrygia

Phrygia lies in western central Anatolia (Asia Minor) between Bithynia, Mysia, Lydia, Pisidia, and Galatia. The cities were found in the valleys and high plains between the many high mountains of the land. The native Phrygians, whose inscriptions have not yet been deciphered, fell under Lydian, then Persian, then Macedonian rule. Greek and Macedonian settlers were planted in Phrygia by the Seleucids and Attalids in a mutual rivalry, but northern Phrygia was overrun by Celts (eventually it would become Galatia). After the defeat of Antiochus at Magnesia, Phrygia was assigned to the kingdom of Pergamum in 188 B.C., after which it became intensely Hellenized and first struck coins. Rome took control, along with the rest of the Pergamene kingdom, in 133 B.C.

Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Colossae, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.,| |Colossae,| |Phrygia|, |AE| |34|
Colossae was on the Lycus (a tributary of the Maeander River) 10 miles southeast of Laodicea, 13 miles from Hierapolis, and 3 miles from Mount Cadmus. In the 4th century B.C., Xenophon described it as one of six large cities of Phrygia. Antiochus the Great relocated two thousand Jewish families from Babylonia and Mesopotamia to Colossae. The city's commerce included trade in wool and woven fabric. It was known for its religious fusion (syncretism) of Jewish, Gnostic, and pagan influences, described in the first century A.D. as an angel-cult. The Apostle Paul addressed an epistle (letter) to the city's Christian community which addressed the cult and exalted the supremacy of Jesus Christ. The city was overrun by the Saracens in the 7th and 8th centuries A.D. and ultimately destroyed by the Turks in the 12th century. As of 2015, it had never been excavated, but there are plans for an Australian-led expedition.
SH33902. Bronze AE 34, RPC Online 1881; vA Phrygiens II 575 (same dies, Vatican museum); BMC Phrygia -; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; et all -, aVF, weight 21.042 g, maximum diameter 34.3 mm, die axis 225o, Colossae (near Honaz, Turkey) mint, obverse AYT KAI Λ AYPH KOMMO∆OΣ, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse ΣTPATHΓ TΩN ΠEPI ZΩΣIMON ∆ ΦIΛOΠATOPA KOΛOΣΣHNΩN, Artemis standing right, quiver at shoulder, holding branch and antler of stag standing behind her; ex Sayles and Lavender; extremely rare; SOLD


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Ankyra in Abbaitis, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.,| |Ankyra| |in| |Abbaitis,| |Phrygia|, |AE| |32|
Ancyra means anchor in Greek. There were two cities named Ancyra in Anatolia, the one in Abbaitis, Phrygia that issued this coin, and another larger city in Galatia, now the capitol of Turkey. Ankyra in Abbaitis may have struck autonomous coins as Abbaetae Mysi in the 2nd century B.C. Under Rome, Ankyra in Abbaitis struck civic coinage from the rule of Nero to the rule of Philip the Arab.
SH26656. Orichalcum AE 32, RPC Online IV 1721 (2 spec.); BMC Phrygia p. 62, 25; SNG Munchen 96, Choice aVF, large flan with full circle strikes on both obverse and reverse, weight 15.418 g, maximum diameter 32.4 mm, die axis 180o, Ankyra in Abbaitis (Ankara, Turkey) mint, Aug 138 - 7 Mar 161 A.D.; obverse AY KAI T AIΛIOC ANTΩEINOC, bare headed and draped bust right; reverse EΠI ΛIKINIOY APX ANKYPANΩN, Cybele enthroned left, patera in right, left arm resting on drum, lion at feet; very rare; SOLD


Collossae, Phrygia, c 177 - 192 A.D.

|Roman| |Asia|, |Collossae,| |Phrygia,| |c| |177| |-| |192| |A.D.|, |AE| |32|
Colossae was on the Lycus (a tributary of the Maeander River) 10 miles southeast of Laodicea, 13 miles from Hierapolis, and 3 miles from Mount Cadmus. In the 4th century B.C., Xenophon described it as one of six large cities of Phrygia. Antiochus the Great relocated two thousand Jewish families from Babylonia and Mesopotamia to Colossae. The city's commerce included trade in wool and woven fabric. It was known for its religious fusion (syncretism) of Jewish, Gnostic, and pagan influences, described in the first century A.D. as an angel-cult. The Apostle Paul addressed an epistle (letter) to the city's Christian community which addressed the cult and exalted the supremacy of Jesus Christ. The city was overrun by the Saracens in the 7th and 8th centuries A.D. and ultimately destroyed by the Turks in the 12th century. As of 2015, it had never been excavated, but there are plans for an Australian-led expedition.
RP86524. Bronze AE 32, RPC Online temp 1899; vA Phrygiens II 496 - 505; SNGvA 3765; SNG Mn 307; SNG Hunt 1938; McClean III 8789; BMC Phrygia p. 155, 5 (all same dies?), F, broad flan, earthen deposits, porous, weight 19.959 g, maximum diameter 32.3 mm, die axis 180o, Colossae mint, c. 177 - 192 A.D.; obverse ∆HMOC - KOΛOCCHNΩ-N, laureate head of young Demos right; reverse Helios standing in galloping quadriga, facing, wearing radiate crown, globe in left hand, torch in right hand, KO-ΛOC/CH-NΩN in two divided lines below horses; ex David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; very rare; SOLD


Amorion, Phrygia, c. 2nd - 3rd Century A.D.

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Amorion,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |2nd| |-| |3rd| |Century| |A.D.|, |medallion|
Amorion in Phrygia was founded in the Hellenistic period. Early historical records that mention the city are strictly limited to a reference by Strabo. On the Byzantine military road from Constantinople to Cilicia, the city flourished under the Byzantine Empire. It declined after the Arab sack of 838, after which 42 Byzantine officers and notables of Amorium were taken as hostages to Samarra (in Iraq today). Refusing to convert to Islam, they were executed there in 845, and became canonized as the "42 Martyrs of Amorium." The city's ruins are located under and around the modern village of Hisarky, 13 kilometers east of the district center, Emirdag, Afyonkarahisar Province, Turkey.
SL87436. Bronze medallion, Apparently unpublished, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG Mn -, SNG Tb -, SNG Tire -, SNG Hunt -, SNG Leypold -, BMC Phrygia -, Imhoof MG -, RPC -, NGC VF, strike 5/5, surface 1/5, pierced (2490378-005), weight 2.155 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 0o, Phrygia, Amorion (Hisarky, Turkey) mint, c. 2nd - 3rd Century A.D.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse AMOPI-A-NΩN, lion advancing right; extremely rare; SOLD


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Sebaste, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Sebaste,| |Phrygia|, |medallion| |AE| |35|
Perseus slaying Medusa!
SH80132. Bronze medallion AE 35, SGICV 2597, aF, weight 21.856 g, maximum diameter 34.9 mm, die axis 180o, Sebaste (Selcikler, Turkey) mint, obverse ANTΩNEINOC, laureate draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse EΠI ΛOVKIΛΛIOV ANTΩNIOV APC, Perseus, naked, reaching right, cutting off Medusa's head, careful not to look at Medusa, he is looking back at Athena and at the reflection of Medusa in Athena's shield, CEBACTH/NΩN in exergue; rare; SOLD


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D., Cotiaeum, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Valerian| |I,| |October| |253| |-| |c.| |June| |260| |A.D.,| |Cotiaeum,| |Phrygia|, |tetrassarion|
Asklepios is the Greek god of medicine. Hygieia is the goddess of health and Askelpois' daughter. Telesphoros is Asklepios' assistant. Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
RP91190. Bronze tetrassarion, SNG Munchen 333; SNGvA 3791; SNG Hunterian 2048; BMC Phrygia p. 177, 95 var. (exergue in two lines...Ω/N); SNG Cop -; SNG Righetti -, Choice VF, well centered, dark patina, highest points flatly struck, small edge split, central depressions, weight 6.308 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 180o, Cotiaeum (Kutahya, Turkey) mint, Oct 253 - c. Jun 260 A.D.; obverse AYT K Π ΛIK OYAΛEPIANON, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse EΠI Π AI ∆HMHTPIANOY IΠΠ (P. Ailios Demetrios, archon and hipparchos), Hygieia, on left, standing right, feeding serpent in right hand from patera in left hand; Asklepios, on right, standing facing, head left, leaning with right hand on serpent-entwined staff; Telesphoros between them, standing facing, ΛP/X in two lines above center, KOTIAEΩN in exergue; SOLD


Faustina Junior, Augusta 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Wife of Marcus Aurelius, Prymnessos, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Faustina| |Junior,| |Augusta| |146| |-| |Winter| |175/176| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Marcus| |Aurelius,| |Prymnessos,| |Phrygia|, |AE| |26|
Prymnessus is the modern day town of Sln in central Turkey.
SH57234. Bronze AE 26, apparently unpublished for Faustina; cf. vA Phrygiens 1086 (Marcus Aurelius), VF, weight 8.419 g, maximum diameter 26.3 mm, die axis 180o, Prymnessus (Sulun, Turkey) mint, obverse CEBACTH ΦAYCTEINA, draped bust right; reverse ΠPYMNHCCΩN, Dikaiosyne (Aequitas) standing left, scales in right hand, ears of grain in raised left; extremely rare; SOLD


Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Amorium, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Claudius,| |25| |January| |41| |-| |13| |October| |54| |A.D.,| |Amorium,| |Phrygia|, |AE| |19|
RP82530. Bronze AE 19, RPC I 3237; Lindgren 878; BMC Phrygia p. 50, 28, VF, weight 4.497 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 0o, Amorion (Hisarkoy, Turkey) mint, obverse TI KΛAY∆IOC ΓEPMANIKOC KAICAP, laureate head right; reverse EΠI ΠE∆ΩNOC KAI KATΩNOC, eagle standing right on uncertain object, wings closed, caduceus under left wing, AMP monogram upper left; SOLD


Lucius Verus, 7 March 161 - February 169 A.D., Midaeum, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Lucius| |Verus,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |February| |169| |A.D.,| |Midaeum,| |Phrygia|, |AE| |28|
Midaeum means Midas' city.
SH80233. Bronze AE 28, ANS 1973.191.41 (different reverse die); SGICV -; SNGvA -; SNG Cop -; SNG Righetti -, SNG Delepierre; Lindgren -, VF, weight 13.437 g, maximum diameter 27.9 mm, die axis 0o, Midaeum mint, obverse AY KA AYΠ − OYHΠOC AP, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse TONKTAC−THN MI∆AEIC, draped bust of King Midas right, wearing Phrygian cap; well centered, very little wear, a little rough; very rare; SOLD


Plautilla, Augusta 202 - 22 January 205 A.D., Otros, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Plautilla,| |Augusta| |202| |-| |22| |January| |205| |A.D.,| |Otros,| |Phrygia|, |AE| |20|
In the chaotic period after Alexander's death, northern Phrygia was overrun by Celts, eventually to become the province of Galatia. The former capital, Gordium, was captured and destroyed by the Gauls soon afterward and disappeared from history. In 188 B.C., the southern remnant of Phrygia came under the control of the Attalids of Pergamon. In 133 B.C., the remnants of Phrygia passed to Rome. For purposes of provincial administration the Romans maintained a divided Phrygia, attaching the northeastern part to the province of Galatia and the western portion to the province of Asia.
RP81584. Bronze AE 20, BMC Phrygia p. 344, 7, Choice aVF, weight 4.034 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 225o, Otros mint, obverse ΦOYΛ ΠΛAYTIΛΛAC, draped bust right, hair in ridges, large bun at back; reverse OTPOHNΩN, Demeter standing left, wearing long chiton and peplos, in extended right three stalks of grain, long torch in left; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

Babelon, E. Trait des Monnaies Grecques et Romaines. (Paris, 1901-1932).
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Head, B. A Catalogue of Greek Coins in the British Museum, Phrygia. (London, 1906).
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Imhoof-Blumer, F. Kleinasiatische Mnzen. (Vienna, 1901-2).
Imhoof-Blumer, F. Zur griechischen und rmischen Mnzkunde. (Geneva, 1908).
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Lindgren, H. & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coins of Asia Minor and the Levant. (San Mateo, 1985).
Mildenberg, L. & S. Hurter, eds. The Dewing Collection of Greek Coins. ACNAC 6. (New York, 1985).
Roman Provincial Coinage Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2: Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
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Strauss, P. Collection Maurice Laffaille - monnaies grecques en bronze. (Ble, 1990).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 6: Phrygia to Cilicia. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
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Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock, Vol. 2: Caria, Lydia, Phrygia, Lycia, Pamphylia. (Berlin, 1962).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain I, Part 2, The Newham Davis Coins in the Marischal College Aberdeen. (London, 1936).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain III, R.C. Lockett Collection, Part 5: Lesbos - Cyrenaica. Addenda. (gold and silver). (London, 1949).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IV, Fitzwilliam Museum, Leake and General Collections, Part 6: Asia Minor: Pontus-Phrygia. (London, 1965).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IX, British Museum, Part 1: The Black Sea. (London, 1993).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XI, The William Stancomb Collection of Coins of the Black Sea Region. (Oxford, 2000).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, Univ. of Glasgow, Part 1: Roman Provincial Coins: Spain-Kingdoms of Asia Minor. (Oxford, 2004).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, sterreich, Sammlung Leypold, Kleinasiatische Mnzen der Kaiserzeit, Vol. II: Phrygia-Commagene. (Vienna, 2004).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Russia, State Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts: Coins of the Black Sea Region. (Leuven, Belgium, 2011).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Schweiz II, Katalog der Sammlung Jean-Pierre Righetti im Bernischen Historischen Museum. (Bern, 1993).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Turkey 5: Tire Museum (Izmir), Vol. 1: Roman Provincial Coins From Ionia, Lydia, Phrygia, etc. (Istanbul, 2011).
von Aulock, H. Mnzen und Stdte Phrygiens. (Tbingen, 1987).
Waddington, W., E. Babelon & T. Reinach. Recueil Gnral des Monnaies Grecques d'Asie Minuere, Vol. I. (Paris, 1904-25).

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