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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Mysia||View Options:  |  |  | 

Ancient Coins of Mysia, Antatolia

Mysia is the northwestern region of Anatolia (Asia Minor) located on the shore of the Propontis (Marmara Sea) between Troas and Bithynia. The chief physical features of Mysia are the two mountains, Mount Olympus at (7600 ft) in the north and Mount Temnus in the south. The most important cities were Pergamon in the valley of the Cacus, and Cyzicus on the Propontis. The whole sea-coast was studded with Greek towns, several of which were places of considerable importance; thus the northern portion included Parium, Lampsacus and Abydos, and the southern Assos, Adramyttium. Further south, on the Eleatic Gulf, were Elaea, Myrina and Cyme.

Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Lampsakos, Mysia

|Lampsakos|, |Augustus,| |16| |January| |27| |B.C.| |-| |19| |August| |14| |A.D.,| |Lampsakos,| |Mysia||AE| |17|NEW
Priapus or Priapos was a minor rustic fertility god, protector of livestock, fruit plants, gardens and male genitalia. Priapus is marked by his absurdly oversized permanent erection, which gave rise to the medical term priapism. He became a popular figure in Roman erotic art and Latin literature, and is the subject of the often humorously obscene collection of verse called the Priapeia. Statues of Priapus were sometimes placed on boundaries and hung with signs which threatened sexual assault on trespassers.
RP111013. Bronze AE 17, RPC I 2274; SNG BnF 1267; BMC Mysia p. 87, 79; Lindgren I 262; SNG Cop -, F, edge splits and cracks, corrosion, weight 3.269 g, maximum diameter 16.8 mm, die axis 45o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 16 Jan 27 B.C. - 19 Aug 14 A.D.; obverse CEBACTOY, youthful laureate head of Augustus right; reverse ithyphallic Priapus standing left, right hand raised, left hand on hip, L-A/M-Ψ/A-K in three divided lines across field; scarce; $125.00 (126.25)


Parion, Mysia, c. 500 - 475 B.C.

|Parium|, |Parion,| |Mysia,| |c.| |500| |-| |475| |B.C.||drachm|NEW
A Gorgoneion was a horror-creating apotropaic Gorgon head pendant. The name derives from the Greek word gorgs, which means "dreadful." The Gorgons were three sisters who had hair of living, venomous snakes, and a horrifying face that turned those who saw it to stone. Stheno and Euryale were immortal, but their sister Medusa was not, and was slain by Perseus. Zeus, Athena, Hellenistic kings and Roman emperors wore Gorgoneion for protection. Images of the Gorgons were also put upon objects and buildings for protection. A Gorgon image is at the center of the pediment of the temple at Corfu, the oldest stone pediment in Greece from about 600 B.C.
GA110685. Silver drachm, SNG BnF 1347; SNG Delepierre 2526; SNGvA 1318; BMC Mysia p. 94, 1; SNG Cop -, gVF, die wear, toned, weight 3.300 g, maximum diameter 13.0 mm, Parion (Kemer, Canakkale, Turkey) mint, c. 500 - 475 B.C.; obverse gorgoneion; reverse incuse square with angles in the corners forming cruciform pattern, pellet in center; $110.00 (111.10)


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Attaea, Mysia

|Other| |Mysia|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Attaea,| |Mysia||AE| |26|
Attaea appears to be known only from its coinage. Its site is uncertain but, based on coin finds, may be Dikeliky, Turkey.
RP110211. Bronze AE 26, SNG BnF 154; SNGvA 1083; BMC Mysia p. 17, 12; AMNG IV 407; SNG Cop -, F, near centered, dark green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, mild porosity, weight 10.071 g, maximum diameter 26.4 mm, die axis 0o, Attaea (Dikeliky, Turkey?) mint, 28 Jan 198 - 8 Apr 217 A.D.; obverse AYT KAI M AYP ANTΩNEINOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse CTP POY AN∆PONOC ATTAITΩN, Youthful male figure on left, standing right, nude, left foot resting on large rock, both arms resting on left knee, bearded male figure (Zeus or Demos), on right, standing facing, wearing himation, left hand reaching toward youth, long scepter vertical in left hand; $100.00 (101.00)


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Lampsakos, Mysia

|Lampsakos|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Lampsakos,| |Mysia
||AE| |16|NEW
This type and a variety with the full ethnic were the only types struck at Lampsakos during the Flavian period.

In Greek mythology, Priapus was a minor rustic fertility god, protector of livestock, fruit plants, gardens and male genitalia. Priapus is marked by his oversized, permanent erection, which gave rise to the medical term priapism. He became a popular figure in Roman erotic art and Latin literature, and is the subject of the often humorously obscene collection of verse called the Priapeia.
RP111643. Bronze AE 16, RPC II 890 (3 spec.), SNG BnF 1270, SNG Cop 235, F/aF, green patina, corrosion, flaw in neck, edge split, weight 2.884 g, maximum diameter 16.0 mm, die axis 180o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 13 Sep 81 - 18 Sep 96 A.D.; obverse ∆OMITIANOC KAICAPI, laureate head right; reverse statue of ithyphallic Priapos standing left on basis, ΛA-MKΨ in downward columns flanking statue; very rare; $100.00 (101.00)


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Parion, Mysia(?)

|Parium|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Parion,| |Mysia(?)||AE| |15|
The attribution of this very rare type to Parium is uncertain. See RPC II p. 137.

The ceremonial founding of a new Roman colony included plowing a furrow, the pomerium, a sacred boundary, around the site of the new city.
RP94451. Bronze AE 15, RPC II Online 889 (12 spec.), SNGvA 6202, F, dark brown patina, light corrosion, tight flan, weight 3.575 g, maximum diameter 15.3 mm, die axis 0o, Parion, Mysia(?) mint, 13 Sep 81 - 18 Sep 96 A.D.; obverse DO-MIT AVG (clockwise from the upper right), laureate head left; reverse priest plowing right with two oxen, marking the pomerium (sacred boundary marked for the foundation of a new Roman colony), GERM in exergue; zero sales of this type recorded on Coin Archives in the last two decades; very rare; $90.00 (90.90)


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Lampsakos, Mysia

|Lampsakos|, |Augustus,| |16| |January| |27| |B.C.| |-| |19| |August| |14| |A.D.,| |Lampsakos,| |Mysia||AE| |16|NEW
Priapus or Priapos was a minor rustic fertility god, protector of livestock, fruit plants, gardens and male genitalia. Priapus is marked by his absurdly oversized permanent erection, which gave rise to the medical term priapism. He became a popular figure in Roman erotic art and Latin literature, and is the subject of the often humorously obscene collection of verse called the Priapeia. Statues of Priapus were sometimes placed on boundaries and hung with signs which threatened sexual assault on trespassers.
RP111641. Bronze AE 16, RPC I 2275 (5 spec.); BMC Mysia p. 87, 78; SNG BnF 1267 var. (rev. leg. arrangement); SNG Cop -, F, green patina, rough, earthen deposits, weight 2.586 g, maximum diameter 15.8 mm, die axis 0o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 16 Jan 27 B.C. - 19 Aug 14 A.D.; obverse CEBACTOY, youthful laureate head of Augustus right, star lower right; reverse LAM-ΨAK (counterclockwise from upper right), ithyphallic Priapus standing left, right hand raised, left hand on hip; scarce; $90.00 (90.90)


Salonina, Augusta 254 - c. September 268 A.D., Pergamon, Mysia

|Pergamon|, |Salonina,| |Augusta| |254| |-| |c.| |September| |268| |A.D.,| |Pergamon,| |Mysia||AE| |27|
Salonina was the wife of emperor Gallienus. A very beautiful and intelligent woman, she was extremely loyal to her husband. Opinion is divided as to whether she was murdered in the purge of Gallienus family after his murder, or if she survived.

Pergamon, Mysia was located to the northwest of the modern city of Bergama, Turkey, 16 miles (26 km) from the Aegean Sea on a promontory on the north side of the Caicus (Bakircay) River. It was the capital of the Kingdom of Pergamon under the Attalid dynasty, 281-133 B.C. Pergamon is cited in the book of Revelation as one of the seven churches of Asia.
RP97266. Bronze AE 27, Weber 5230, SNG BnF 2304 var. (...CE), SNG Tanrikulu 315 var. (same), SNG Cop -, SNGvA -; SNG Hunt -, BMC Mysia -, VF, well centered, a bit rough and porous, weight 6.447 g, maximum diameter 27.1 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, 254 - c. Sep 268 A.D.; obverse KOP CAΛΩNEINA CEB, diademed and draped bust right, wearing stephane, hair in ridges and in plait looped below ear up the back of head; reverse EΠI C AVP ∆AMA ΠEPΓAMH/NΩN - ΠPΩ - Γ - NEΩK (in two clockwise lines), Hygieia standing right, feeding snake held in her right hand, from philae in her left hand; ex Gorny & Mosch online auction 259 (20 Oct 2018), lot 3468; first specimen of this type handled by FORVM; rare; $85.00 (85.85)


Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D., Germe ad Rhyndakos, Mysia

|Other| |Mysia|, |Titus,| |24| |June| |79| |-| |13| |September| |81| |A.D.,| |Germe| |ad| |Rhyndakos,| |Mysia||AE| |22|
There were two towns named Germe: Germe ad Rhyndakos near Pergamum in Mysia and Germa ad Caicus in Lydia. BMC and SNG Cop include the city under Lydia, but recent scholarship indicates only Germe ad Rhyndakos in Mysia struck coins.
RP97866. Bronze AE 22, Ehling 35 - 46; BMC Lydia p. 82, 14; RPC Online II 926 (15 spec); SNG Righetti 710; SNG Lewis 1356; Lindgren III 460; SNG Cop -, aVF, green patina with some chipping, scratches, oval flan, weight 3.408 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 0o, Mysia, Germe ad Rhyndakos mint, 24 Jun 79 - 13 Sep 81 A.D.; obverse AYTO T KAI CEBAC, laureate head right; reverse ΓEPMHNWN, Apollo standing facing, head left, patera in right hand, kithara (lyre) in left hand; scarce; $70.00 (70.70)


Adramytion, Mysia, 2nd Century B.C.

|Other| |Mysia|, |Adramytion,| |Mysia,| |2nd| |Century| |B.C.||AE| |20|
Adramytteion was a coastal town northwest of Pergamon in Mysia, said to be founded by Adramys, brother of King Kroisos. In classical times, Adramyttium received settlers from Athens and Delos. It later belonged to the Roman province of Asia, whose capital was Ephesus. The ancient city with its harbor has entirely disappeared. Paul, while being taken as prisoner from Caesarea to Rome, embarked upon a ship belonging to Adramyttium (Acts 27:2). It conveyed him only to Myra, in Lycia, from which he sailed on an Alexandrian ship for Italy.
GB99076. Bronze AE 20, SNG BnF 22; SNG Cop 7; AMNG IV p. 17, 35; BMC Mysia p. 3, 7; Waddington 612; SNGvA 1052 var. (no bow or quiver), aVF, attractive style, brown tone, slightly rough, inscription obscure, weight 6.543 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 0o, Adramytion (Edremit, Turkey) mint, 2nd century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo left, hair tied at the back with two locks falling down neck, bow and quiver at shoulder; reverse cornucopia overflowing with grain, pomegranate, and a bunch of grapes hanging down to the left, flanked by two pilei (caps of the Dioscuri) with stars above, A∆PA-MY/TH-NΩN in two lines above and below caps; $70.00 (70.70)


Lampsakos, Mysia, 4th Century B.C.

|Lampsakos|, |Lampsakos,| |Mysia,| |4th| |Century| |B.C.||AE| |10|
Lampsakos was founded by Greek colonists from Phocaea in the 6th century B.C. Soon afterward it became a main competitor of Miletus, controlling the trade roots in the Dardanelles. During the 6th and 5th centuries B.C., Lampsacus was successively dominated by Lydia, Persia, Athens, and Sparta. Artaxerxes I assigned it to Themistocles with the expectation that the city supply the Persian king with its famous wine. When Lampsacus joined the Delian League after the battle of Mycale in 479 B.C., it paid a tribute of twelve talents, a testimony to its wealth.
GB99210. Bronze AE 10, SNG Cop 206, SNG BnF 1223, SNGvA 1300, Waddington 887, aVF, glossy green patina, corrosion, pitting, weight 1.725 g, maximum diameter 10.3 mm, die axis 270o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 4th century B.C.; obverse ΛAM, female (nymph IO?) head right, hair in sakkos; reverse ΨA, forepart of Pegasos right; $60.00 (60.60)










REFERENCES|

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