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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Mysia| ▸ |Cyzicus||View Options:  |  |  | 

Ancient Greek Coins of Kyzikos, Mysia

Cyzicus was one of the great cities of the ancient world. It was said to have been founded by Pelasgians from Thessaly, according to tradition at the coming of the Argonauts; later, allegedly in 756 B.C., it received many colonists from Miletus. Owing to its advantageous position it speedily acquired commercial importance, and the gold staters of Cyzicus were a staple currency in the ancient world till they were superseded by those of Philip of Macedon. During the Peloponnesian War (431-404 B.C.) Cyzicus was subject to the Athenians and Lacedaemonians alternately. In the naval Battle of Cyzicus in 410, an Athenian fleet completely destroyed a Spartan fleet. At the peace of Antalcidas in 387, like the other Greek cities in Asia, it was made over to Persia. Alexander the Great captured it from the Persians in 334 B.C. In 74 B.C. allied with Rome, it withstood a siege by 300,000 men led by King Mithridates VI of Pontus. Rome rewarded this loyalty with territory and with municipal independence which lasted until the reign of Tiberius. When it was incorporated into the Empire, Cyzicus was made the capital of Mysia, and afterward of Hellespontus. Gallienus opened an imperial mint at Cyzicus, which continued to strike coins well into the Byzantine era. The site of Cyzicus, located on the Erdek and Bandirma roads, is protected by Turkey's Ministry of Culture.

Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

|Maximian|, |Maximian,| |286| |-| |305,| |306| |-| |308,| |and| |310| |A.D.||post-reform| |radiate|NEW
On 1 March 293, Diocletian and Maximian appointed Constantius Chlorus and Galerius as Caesars. This is considered the beginning of the Tetrarchy, known as the Quattuor Principes Mundi ("Four Rulers of the World"). The four Tetrarchs established their capitals close to the Roman frontier: Diocletian at Nicomedia in Bithynia (Izmit, Turkey), Maximian at Mediolanum in Italy (Milan, Italy), Constantius at Augusta Treverorum in Gallia Belgica (Trier, Germany), and Galerius at Sirmium in Pannonia (Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia).
RL94881. Billon post-reform radiate, Hunter V 88 (also 5th officina), RIC VI 16b, SRCV IV 13315, Cohen VI 54, Choice gVF, nice near black desert patina with highlighting red earthen deposits, excellent portrait, well centered, weight 3.939 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 0o, 5th Officina Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 295 - 299 A.D.; obverse IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, radiate draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse CONCORDIA MILITVM (harmony with the soldiers), Maximianus standing right, holding short scepter and receiving Victory on globe from Jupiter; Jupiter standing left, holding long scepter in right hand, K E low center between them; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00
 


Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

|Maximian|, |Maximian,| |286| |-| |305,| |306| |-| |308,| |and| |310| |A.D.||antoninianus|NEW
Maximian was emperor of the West in the Tetrarchy, abdicating with Diocletian in 305. In 306 he resumed the throne with his son Maxentius but was again forced to abdicate in 308. He took the throne again in 310 but this time he was defeated by Constantine the Great and forced to commit suicide.
RL94879. Billon antoninianus, Hunter IV 53 (also 4th officina), SRCV IV 13115, Cohen VI 53, RIC V-2 607 var. (no dot exergue), VF, highlighting desert patina, full border obv., small spot of corrosion on obv., rev. die wear, rev. slightly off center, weight 3.883 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 292 - 294 A.D.; obverse IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse CONCORDIA MILITVM (harmony with the soldiers), Maximianus standing right, holding scepter and receiving Victory on globe from Jupiter standing left, holding long scepter, ∆ between them, XXI• in exergue; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $65.00 SALE |PRICE| $58.50
 


Kyzikos, Mysia, 480 - 450 B.C.

|Members| |Auction| |Listed|, |Kyzikos,| |Mysia,| |480| |-| |450| |B.C.||obol|
Cyzicus was one of the great cities of the ancient world. During the Peloponnesian War (431-404 B.C.) Cyzicus was subject to the Athenians and Lacedaemonians alternately. In the naval Battle of Cyzicus in 410, an Athenian fleet completely destroyed a Spartan fleet. At the peace of Antalcidas in 387, like the other Greek cities in Asia, it was made over to Persia. Alexander the Great captured it from the Persians in 334 B.C.
MA95440. Silver obol, SNG BnF 370; BMC Mysia, p. 35, 116; cf. SNGvA (1.18g, trihemiobol), SNG Kayhan 54 1.13g, trihemiobol), SNG Cop 45 ff. (1.15 - 1.27g, trihemiobol), gVF, edge chips, weight 0.749 g, maximum diameter 10.2 mm, die axis 135o, Kyzikos (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 480 - 450 B.C.; obverse forepart of boar running left, tunny fish upwards behind; reverse roaring lion head left within incuse square; SOLD







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REFERENCES|

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