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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Mysia| ▸ |Cyzicus||View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Greek Coins of Kyzikos, Mysia

Cyzicus was one of the great cities of the ancient world. It was said to have been founded by Pelasgians from Thessaly, according to tradition at the coming of the Argonauts; later, allegedly in 756 B.C., it received many colonists from Miletus. Owing to its advantageous position it speedily acquired commercial importance, and the gold staters of Cyzicus were a staple currency in the ancient world till they were superseded by those of Philip of Macedon. During the Peloponnesian War (431-404 B.C.) Cyzicus was subject to the Athenians and Lacedaemonians alternately. In the naval Battle of Cyzicus in 410, an Athenian fleet completely destroyed a Spartan fleet. At the peace of Antalcidas in 387, like the other Greek cities in Asia, it was made over to Persia. Alexander the Great captured it from the Persians in 334 B.C. In 74 B.C. allied with Rome, it withstood a siege by 300,000 men led by King Mithridates VI of Pontus. Rome rewarded this loyalty with territory and with municipal independence which lasted until the reign of Tiberius. When it was incorporated into the Empire, Cyzicus was made the capital of Mysia, and afterward of Hellespontus. Gallienus opened an imperial mint at Cyzicus, which continued to strike coins well into the Byzantine era. The site of Cyzicus, located on the Erdek and Bandirma roads, is protected by Turkey's Ministry of Culture.

Kyzikos, Mysia, c. 500 - 450 B.C.

|Cyzicus|, |Kyzikos,| |Mysia,| |c.| |500| |-| |450| |B.C.|, |hekte|
Cyzicus was one of the great cities of the ancient world. It was said to have been founded by Pelasgians from Thessaly, according to tradition at the coming of the Argonauts; later, allegedly in 756 B.C., it received many colonists from Miletus. Owing to its advantageous position it speedily acquired commercial importance, and the gold staters of Cyzicus were a staple currency in the ancient world till they were superseded by those of Philip of Macedon. The site of Cyzicus, located on the Erdek and Bandirma roads, is protected by Turkey's Ministry of Culture.
SL89446. Electrum hekte, SNG BnF 241; SNGvA 1180; BMC Mysia p. 32, 98; Von Fritze I 102; Rosen 482; de Luynes pl. XCII 2460; SNG Cop -, NGC XF, strike 3/5, surface 3/5 (2490378-004), weight 2.674 g, maximum diameter 11.4 mm, Kyzikos (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 500 - 450 B.C.; obverse satyr left, tunny fish vertical with head down to left; reverse quadripartite incuse square; NGC| Lookup; extremely rare; $900.00 SALE |PRICE| $810.00 ON RESERVE


Kyzikos, Mysia, c. 450 - 400 B.C.

|Cyzicus|, |Kyzikos,| |Mysia,| |c.| |450| |-| |400| |B.C.|, |hemiobol|
During the Peloponnesian War, 431 - 404 B.C., Cyzicus was subject alternately to the Athenians and Lacedaemonians. In the naval Battle of Cyzicus in 410, an Athenian fleet completely destroyed a Spartan fleet. At the peace of Antalcidas in 387, like the other Greek cities in Asia, it was made over to Persia. Alexander the Great captured it from the Persians in 334 B.C.
GA95216. Silver hemiobol, von Fritze III 14; SNG Kayhan 57; SNG BnF 375; SNG Cop 49; BMC Mysia p. 35, 120; SNGvA -, EF, well struck and centered on a crowded flan, toned, weight 0.386 g, maximum diameter 10.2 mm, die axis 0o, Kyzikos (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 450 - 400 B.C.; obverse forepart of boar running left, tunny fish upwards behind; reverse head of roaring lion left, star of four rays above, all in incuse square; ex Forum (2015); $170.00 SALE |PRICE| $153.00
 


Kyzikos, Mysia, c. 200 - 100 B.C.

|Cyzicus|, |Kyzikos,| |Mysia,| |c.| |200| |-| |100| |B.C.|, |AE| |22|
The torch is a symbol of Demeter. After Hades abducted Demeter's virgin daughter Persephone to be his wife, Demeter searched for her lighting her way through the earth with torches. While she searched, she was preoccupied with loss and grief. The seasons halted; living things ceased their growth, then began to die. Faced with the extinction of all life on earth, Zeus sent his messenger Hermes to the underworld to bring Persephone back. However, because she had eaten while in the underworld, Hades had a claim on her. Therefore, it was decreed that she would spend four months each year in the underworld. During these months Demeter grieves for her daughter's absence, withdrawing her gifts from the world, creating winter. Persephone's return brings the spring.
GB92132. Bronze AE 22, SNG BnF 490 var.; SNG Cop 82 var.; SNG Tübingen 2265 var.; SNGvA 1241 var.; BMC Mysia p. 39, 161 (none with this control monogram), VF, green patina, scattered porosity, edge splits, beveled obverse edge, central depressions, weight 5.767 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 0o, Kyzikos (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 200 - 100 B.C.; obverse bull butting right on exergue line; reverse flaming torch, KYZI/KHNΩN in two flanking downward lines starting on the right, monogram (control) lower right; ex Ancient Imports (Marc Breitsprecher); $115.00 SALE |PRICE| $104.00
 


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Cyzicus, Mysia, Poppaea or Statilia Messalina Reverse

|Cyzicus|, |Nero,| |13| |October| |54| |-| |9| |June| |68| |A.D.,| |Cyzicus,| |Mysia,| |Poppaea| |or| |Statilia| |Messalina| |Reverse|, |AE| |16|
RPC I notes, "although certainty is not at the moment possible (because of the small size and relatively poor preservation of the coins), the portrait of Nero seems to be the "steps" portrait, introduced in 63. If so, the bust should be that of Poppaea (or possibly Statilia Messalina)." In 62 A.D., Nero divorced Octavia and married Poppaea. In the summer of 65, Nero and Poppaea quarreled. She was pregnant. In a fit of rage, Nero kicked her in the abdomen, killing her. Statilia Messalina was already Nero's mistress. After Poppaea's death, Nero forced Statilia's husband to commit suicide, so he could marry her. Statilia kept a low profile in public and survived the fall of his reign. After Nero's death, Otho promised to marry her, before his suicide in 69.
RP85905. Bronze AE 16, RPC I 2249 (3 spec.), BMC Mysia -, SNG BnF -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG Hunterian -, SNG Tübingen -, Lindgren -, aF, green patina, weight 3.390 g, maximum diameter 15.8 mm, die axis 0o, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 63 - 65 A.D.; obverse NEPΩN (counterclockwise on right), bare head of Nero right, ΦY monogram behind; reverse K-Y-Z (K over Z in left field, Z appearing as I, Y in right field), draped bust of empress right; only one specimen on Coin Archives; extremely rare; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00
 


Kyzikos, Mysia, c. 475 - 450 B.C.

|Cyzicus|, |Kyzikos,| |Mysia,| |c.| |475| |-| |450| |B.C.|, |obol|
During the Peloponnesian War 431-404 B.C. Cyzicus was subject to the Athenians and Lacedaemonians alternately. In the naval Battle of Cyzicus in 410, an Athenian fleet routed and completely destroyed a Spartan fleet. At the peace of Antalcidas in 387 B.C., like the other Greek cities in Asia, it was made over to Persia. Alexander the Great later captured it from the Persians in 334 B.C.
GS92955. Silver obol, SNG Cop 50; SNGvA 1215; SNG Tüb 2228, BMC Mysia p. 35, 121; Klein 266; SNG Kayhan -, VF, toned, tight oval flan, light corrosion, weight 0.741 g, maximum diameter 10.6 mm, die axis 180o, Kyzikos (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 475 - 450 B.C.; obverse forepart of boar running left, tunny fish upwards behind; reverse head of roaring lion left, backward K above left, all in incuse square; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00
 


Kyzikos, Mysia, 480 - 450 B.C.

|Members| |Auction| |Listed|, |Kyzikos,| |Mysia,| |480| |-| |450| |B.C.|, |obol|
Cyzicus was one of the great cities of the ancient world. During the Peloponnesian War (431-404 B.C.) Cyzicus was subject to the Athenians and Lacedaemonians alternately. In the naval Battle of Cyzicus in 410, an Athenian fleet completely destroyed a Spartan fleet. At the peace of Antalcidas in 387, like the other Greek cities in Asia, it was made over to Persia. Alexander the Great captured it from the Persians in 334 B.C.
MA95440. Silver obol, SNG BnF 370; BMC Mysia, p. 35, 116; cf. SNGvA (1.18g, trihemiobol), SNG Kayhan 54 1.13g, trihemiobol), SNG Cop 45 ff. (1.15 - 1.27g, trihemiobol), gVF, edge chips, weight 0.749 g, maximum diameter 10.2 mm, die axis 135o, Kyzikos (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 480 - 450 B.C.; obverse forepart of boar running left, tunny fish upwards behind; reverse roaring lion head left within incuse square; $40.00 (€36.80)


Kyzikos, Mysia, c. 1st Century B.C.

|Cyzicus|, |Kyzikos,| |Mysia,| |c.| |1st| |Century| |B.C.|, |AE| |20|
In 74 B.C. Cyzicus, allied with Rome, withstood a siege by King Mithridates VI of Pontus. Rome rewarded this loyalty with territory and with municipal independence which lasted until the reign of Tiberius. When it was incorporated into the Empire, it was made the capital of Mysia, afterward of Hellespontus. Cyzicus was one of the great cities of the ancient world.
GB91361. Bronze AE 20, cf. SNG BnF 464 var. (H below), SNGvA 1235 (uncertain letter below); SNG Cop 72 (same); BMC Mysia p. 39, 151 (same), F, attractive green patina, well centered, some scattered porosity, light earthen deposits, weight 5.687 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 0o, Kyzikos (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 1st century B.C.; obverse bust of Kore Soteira right, wreathed with grain; reverse KY/ZI in two lines, monogram at center, all inside oak wreath, uncertain Greek letter below wreath; $36.00 SALE |PRICE| $32.40
 


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

|Constantius| |II|, |Constantius| |II,| |22| |May| |337| |-| |3| |November| |361| |A.D.|, |reduced| |centenionalis|
In a religious context, votum, plural vota, is a vow or promise made to a deity. The word comes from the past participle of voveo, vovere; as the result of the verbal action "vow, promise", it may refer also to the fulfillment of this vow, that is, the thing promised. The votum is thus an aspect of the contractual nature of Roman religion, a bargaining expressed by do ut des, "I give that you might give."
RL92710. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VIII Cyzicus 49 (S), SRCV V 18074, LRBC II 1307, Cohen 335, Hunter V -, aVF, well centered, earthen encrustation, scrapes, obverse legend weak and obscured, weight 1.822 g, maximum diameter 14.4180 mm, die axis 180o, 8th officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 347 - 348 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, rosette-diademed head right; reverse VOT XX MVLT XXX, inscription in four lines within wreath, SMKH in exergue; scarce; $28.00 SALE |PRICE| $25.00
 


Byzantine Empire, Justin II, 15 November 565 - 5 October 578 A.D.

|Justin| |II|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Justin| |II,| |15| |November| |565| |-| |5| |October| |578| |A.D.|, |half| |follis|
In 572, the Byzantine Empire was at war with Persia and was attacked by the Visigoths from Spain.
MA95681. Bronze half follis, DOC I 131.1 (also missing the first S in Justinus), Ratto 888, SBCV 373, V, green patina, scratches, porosity, weight 4.958 g, maximum diameter 24.9 mm, die axis 180o, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 572 - 573 A.D.; obverse d N IVTIMV-S P P AVS, Justin II seated on left and Sophia seated on right facing on double throne, both are nimbate, he holds a globus cruciger, she holds a cruciform scepter, cross between heads; reverse large K (20 nummi), between A/N/N/O and ϖII (year 8), cross above, KYZ (Cyzicus) in exergue; $22.00 (€20.24) ON RESERVE


Crispus, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 326 A.D.

|Crispus|, |Crispus,| |Caesar,| |1| |March| |317| |-| |326| |A.D.|, |reduced| |follis|
The reverse legend dedicates this coin to "Jupiter the Protector." The Roman's believed as the king of the gods, Jupiter favored those in positions of authority similar to his own. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he was therefore the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
MA95694. Billon reduced follis, RIC VII Cyzicus 17 (R3), SRCV IV 16685, Cohen VII 77, VF, nice green patina, earthen deposits, weight 2.592 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 0o, 4th officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 321 - 324 A.D.; obverse D N FL IVL CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI (to Jupiter the protector), Jupiter standing left, Victory on globe in right hand, scepter in left hand, eagle with wreath in beak to left, X/IIΓ and captive right, SMK∆ in exergue; $13.55 (€12.47)




  



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REFERENCES|

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