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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Denominations| ▸ |Eastern Denarii||View Options:  |  |  | 

Eastern Denarii
Caligula, 16 March 37 - 24 January 41 A.D., Caesarea, Cappadocia

|Cappadocia|, |Caligula,| |16| |March| |37| |-| |24| |January| |41| |A.D.,| |Caesarea,| |Cappadocia||drachm|NEW
Kayseri, originally called Mazaka or Mazaca, is in central Turkey on a low spur on the north side of Mount Erciyes (Mount Argaeus in ancient times). During Achaemenid Persian rule, it was the capital of a Satrapy on the crossroads of the Royal Road from Sardis to Susa and the trade route from Sinope to the Euphrates. It was conquered by Alexander's general Perdikkas, was ruled by Eumenes of Cardia, then passed to the Seleucid empire after the battle of Ipsus. It became the capital of the independent Cappadocian Kingdom under Ariarathes III, around 250 B.C. During Strabo's time it was also known as Eusebia, after the Cappadocian King Ariarathes V Eusebes, 163 130 B.C. The name was changed again to "Caesarea in Cappadocia" in honor of Caesar Augustus, upon his death in 14 A.D. The city passed under formal Roman rule in 17 A.D. In Roman times, it prospered on the route from Ephesus to the East. Caesarea was destroyed by the Sassanid King Shapur I after his victory over the Emperor Valerian I in 260 A.D. At the time it was recorded to have around 400,000 inhabitants. Arabic influence changed Caesarea to the modern name Kayseri. The city gradually recovered and has a population of around 1 million people today. Few traces of the ancient city survive.
RS110687. Silver drachm, RPC Online I 3624 (11 spec.), Henseler 87, RIC I 63, BMCRE I 102, Cohen I 12, SNG Cop 176, F, toned, broad flan, obv. off center, rough, weight 2.731 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 0o, Cappadocia, Caesarea (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, c. 37 - 38 A.D.; obverse C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS, bare head right; reverse IMPERATOR PONT MAX AVG TR POT, simpulum and lituus; rare; $400.00 SALE PRICE $360.00


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

|Septimius| |Severus|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.||denarius|NEW
Victory or Nike is seen with wings in most statues and paintings, with one of the most famous being the Winged Victory of Samothrace. Most other winged deities in the Greek pantheon had shed their wings by Classical times. Nike is the goddess of strength, speed, and victory. Nike was a very close acquaintance of Athena and is thought to have stood in Athena's outstretched hand in the statue of Athena located in the Parthenon. Victory or Nike is also one of the most commonly portrayed figures on Greek and Roman coins.
RS111583. Silver denarius, BMCRE V p. 99, W397; RIC IV 425 (S); RSC III 697; SRCV II -; Hunter III -, VF, tight flan cutting off parts of legends, porosity, weight 2.965 g, maximum diameter 16.2 mm, die axis 0o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 194 - 195 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE L SEP SEV - PERT AVG COS II, laureate head right; reverse VICTO-R AV-G (the victory of the Emperor), Victory advancing left, wreath in extended right hand, palm frond in left hand sloped up and to right near left shoulder; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 124 (8 Jan 2023), lot 986 (part of); scarce; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Pescennius Niger, April to 1 June 193 - March, April or May 194 A.D.

|Pescennius| |Niger|, |Pescennius| |Niger,| |April| |to| |1| |June| |193| |-| |March,| |April| |or| |May| |194| |A.D.||denarius|
The Romans believed that Fortuna, after deserting the Persians and Assyrians, took flight over Macedonia and saw Alexander perish as she passed into Egypt and into Syria. At last arriving on Mount Palatine, she threw aside her wings and casting away her wheel, entered Rome where she took up her abode forever.
SH28187. Silver denarius, cf. Lanz 114, 447 and CNG 61, 1848 (both with different obv legends); cf. RIC IV 29 for rev type (based on BMC specimen which doesn't actually exist), gVF but softly struck, weight 3.105 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse [IMP CAES C] PESCE NIGER IVSTI AV, laureate head right; reverse FORTVNAE REDVCI, Fortuna standing left, grounded long palm vertical in right, cornucopia in left; extremely rare; SOLD


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

|Vespasian|, |Vespasian,| |1| |July| |69| |-| |24| |June| |79| |A.D.||denarius|
Ephesus peaked during the 1st and 2nd century A.D. when it was second in importance and size only to Rome, with a population estimated at 400,000 to 500,000 in 100 A.D. The city was famous for the Temple of Artemis, the Library of Celsus, and its theater, seating 25,000 spectators. Ephesus also had several large bath complexes and one of the most advanced aqueduct systems in the ancient world. Water powered numerous mills, one of which has been identified as a sawmill for marble. The city and temple were destroyed by the Goths in 263 A.D., marking the decline of the city's splendor.
RS77202. Silver denarius, RIC II-1 1457; BMCRE II 475; RSC II 277; RPC II 853; Hunter I 192, gVF, excellent portrait, toned, some luster in recesses, tight flan, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.275 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, Ephesus mint, 74 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS V TR P P P, laureate head right; reverse PACI AVGVSTAE, Victory advancing right, filleted wreath raised in extended right hand, palm frond in left hand over left shoulder; star lower right, annulet below; very rare; SOLD


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

|Septimius| |Severus|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.||denarius|
Emesa frequently copied old coin reverse types. Sometimes they even copied old inscriptions listing honors that applied, not to the current emperor, but to the long dead emperor who issued the copied type. The normal Severan crescent and seven stars reverse has the legend SAECVL FELICIT (era of happy good fortune). Only a few Severan examples are known with this AETERNITAS AVS legend, copied from Pescennius Niger. We know of one example for Julia Domna, two for Severus with a COS obverse legend, and this coin with a COS II obverse. This coin is unpublished and, to the best of our knowledge, unique
SH59264. Silver denarius, Unpublished and likely unique; RIC IV -, RSC III -, BMCRE V -, Mazzini -; Hunter -, aVF/VF, light toning, weight 2.648 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 180o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 194 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, laureate head right; reverse AETERNITAS AVS , crescent and seven stars; extremely rare; SOLD


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

|Septimius| |Severus|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.||denarius|
Bonus Eventus, the god of good outcomes, was originally worshiped by the Romans as a deity especially presiding over agriculture and successful harvests. During the Imperial era, he was associated with other types of success. The epithet Bonus, "the Good," is used with other abstract deities such as Bona Fortuna ("Good Fortune"), Bona Mens ("Good Thinking" or "Sound Mind"), and Bona Spes ("Good Hope," perhaps to be translated as "optimism"), as well as with the mysterious and multivalent Bona Dea, a goddess whose rites were celebrated by women.
RS68070. Silver denarius, RIC IV 369, RSC III 68, BMCRE V 343, SRCV II 6267, aEF, well centered, weight 3.081 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 180o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 194 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, laureate head right; reverse BONI EVENTVS, Bonus Eventus standing left, basket of fruit in right, two heads of grain in left; SOLD







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