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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Recovery of the Empire| ▸ |Aurelian||View Options:  |  |  | 

Aurelian, August or September 270 - October or November 275 A.D.

L Domitius Aurelianus was born in Sirmium about 207 A.D. Of humble background, Aurelian rose in the ranks to become one of Rome's greatest generals. Proclaimed emperor around 270 A.D., he quickly crushed the various usurpers, restoring to its largest extent except for the Dacia, which was abandoned permanently. Aurelian then embarked on a series of public works meant to restore the empire's shattered infrastructure. His brilliant rule was cut short by a court conspiracy ending in his assassination in 275 A.D. Rome in 271 A.D.

|Aurelian|, |Aurelian,| |August| |270| |-| |October| |or| |November| |275| |A.D.||antoninianus|
Aurelian issued some rare antoninianii before his coinage reform which introduced larger, better silvered, and generally rounder coins, sometimes identified as a new denomination, the aurelianus. This coin is dedicated to the goddess Fides for her good quality of preserving the public peace by keeping the army true to its allegiance.
RA110046. Billon antoninianus, MER-RIC T1584, RIC V-2 28, Gbl MIR 90a, SRCV III 11533, Blackmoor 3644, Venra 14-20, Komin 574, Normanby 1242, BnF XII -, Hunter IV - (p. cvii), VF, small flan cracks/splits, obverse off center, weight 2.657 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Rome mint, 1st issue, Oct - Dec 270 A.D.; obverse IMP C L DOM AVRELIANVS AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing left, vexillum in right hand, long scepter in left hand, E right; $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00


|Aurelian|, |Aurelian,| |August| |270| |-| |October| |or| |November| |275| |A.D.||denarius|
Victory or Nike is seen with wings in most statues and paintings, with one of the most famous being the Winged Victory of Samothrace. Most other winged deities in the Greek pantheon had shed their wings by Classical times. Nike is the goddess of strength, speed, and victory. Nike was a very close acquaintance of Athena and is thought to have stood in Athena's outstretched hand in the statue of Athena located in the Parthenon. Victory or Nike is also one of the most commonly portrayed figures on Greek and Roman coins.
SH47767. Billon denarius, RIC V-1 71, BnF XII 185, Gbl MIR 135f2, MER-RIC 1799 var. (also draped), superb EF, near full silvering, excellent full strike, weight 2.779 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Rome mint, issue 10, end 274 A.D.; obverse IMP C AVRELIANVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIA AVG (the victory of the Emperor), Victory walking left, wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand, B left, VSV in exergue; SOLD


|Aurelian|, |Aurelian,| |August| |270| |-| |October| |or| |November| |275| |A.D.||antoninianus|
The only other know specimen of this type, MER-RIC T2578 was offered by CGB in its mail bid sale XVI (31 Dec 2002), lot 657. Described as UNIQUE and VF, it went unsold with an estimate of 500 Euros. Our specimen is MUCH nicer.
RA92318. Billon antoninianus, MER-RIC T2578 (1 spec., CGB XVI, 31 Dec 2002, lot 657), BnF XII -, Gbl MIR -, Hunter IV -, RIC V-2 -, Cohen VI -, SRCV III -, et al. -, aEF, much silvering with some luster, well centered on a tight flan, nice portrait, flow lines, some light marks, reverse weak, weight 2.542 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 180o, Serdica (Sofia, Bulgaria) mint, c. 271 A.D.; obverse IMP AVRELIANVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse CONSERVATORI, Aesculapius standing slightly right, head left, leaning on snake entwined staff, S in exergue; only the second known specimen of this type!; extremely rare; SOLD


Palmyrene-Roman Empire, Aurelian and Vabalathus, c. Nov 270 - Mar 272 A.D.

|Vabalathus|, |Palmyrene-Roman| |Empire,| |Aurelian| |and| |Vabalathus,| |c.| |Nov| |270| |-| |Mar| |272| |A.D.||antoninianus|
According to Zosimus, after his defeat, Vaballathus died on the way to Rome. Other sources imply Aurelian allowed Vaballathus and his mother Zenobia to live, but only after they had been marched through the streets of Rome in a triumphal procession. This would have been humiliating, but better than death. This theory is supported by Aurelian's similar treatment of the Tetrici, Tetricus I and Tetricus II of the Gallic Empire, long-time enemies of Rome whom the emperor allowed to retire following their defeat at the Battle of Chlons in 274.
RA35037. Billon antoninianus, MER-RIC 3107, RIC V-2 381, BnF XII 1248, Hunter IV 7, Gbl MIR 353a5, Cohen VI 1, SRCV III 11718, Choice gVF, weight 3.646 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 135o, 5th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, Nov 270 - Mar 272 A.D.; obverse IMP C AVRELIANVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, E below; reverse VABALATHVS V C R IM D R, laureate, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; SOLD


Palmyrene-Roman Empire, Aurelian and Vabalathus, c. Nov 270 - Mar 272 A.D.

|Vabalathus|, |Palmyrene-Roman| |Empire,| |Aurelian| |and| |Vabalathus,| |c.| |Nov| |270| |-| |Mar| |272| |A.D.||antoninianus|
In 272, the Emperor Aurelian crossed the Bosporus and advanced quickly through Anatolia. While the Roman general Marcus Aurelius Probus recovered Egypt. Aurelian defeated Zenobia in the Battle of Immae near Antioch. The Palmyrene armies retreated to Antioch, then later Emesa, while Aurelian advanced and took the former. The defeat at Emesa forced the Palmyrene armies to evacuate to the capital. The Romans began a siege. Zenobia, Vaballathus's mother, left the city and headed east to ask the Sasanian Empire for help. The Romans followed the queen, arrested her near the Euphrates, and brought her back to the emperor. Soon after the city fell. Vaballathus, his mother and her council were taken to Emesa and put on trial. Most of the high-ranking Palmyrene officials were executed. Vaballathus and Zenobia were sent to Rome to be displayed in Aurelian's Triumph.
RA85171. Billon antoninianus, MER-RIC 3113, BnF XII 1259, Gbl MIR 353a8, Venra 10809, RIC V-2 381, Cohen VI 1, SRCV III 11718, Hunter IV -, Choice EF, well centered and struck, coppery surfaces, weight 3.313 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 0o, 8th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, Nov 270 - Mar 272 A.D.; obverse IMP C AVRELIANVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust of Aurelian right, from the front, H below; reverse VABALATHVS V C R IM D R, laureate, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Vabalathus right, from behind; SOLD


Palmyrene-Roman Empire, Aurelian and Vabalathus, c. Nov 270 - Mar 272 A.D.

|Vabalathus|, |Palmyrene-Roman| |Empire,| |Aurelian| |and| |Vabalathus,| |c.| |Nov| |270| |-| |Mar| |272| |A.D.||antoninianus|
In 272, the Emperor Aurelian crossed the Bosporus and advanced quickly through Anatolia. While the Roman general Marcus Aurelius Probus recovered Egypt. Aurelian defeated Zenobia in the Battle of Immae near Antioch. The Palmyrene armies retreated to Antioch, then later Emesa, while Aurelian advanced and took the former. The defeat at Emesa forced the Palmyrene armies to evacuate to the capital. The Romans began a siege. Zenobia, Vaballathus's mother, left the city and headed east to ask the Sasanian Empire for help. The Romans followed the queen, arrested her near the Euphrates, and brought her back to the emperor. Soon after the city fell. Vaballathus, his mother and her council were taken to Emesa and put on trial. Most of the high-ranking Palmyrene officials were executed. Vaballathus and Zenobia were sent to Rome to be displayed in Aurelian's Triumph.
RA85177. Billon antoninianus, MER-RIC 3106, BnF XII 1246, Gbl MIR 353a4, RIC V-2 381, Cohen VI 1, SRCV III 11718, Hunter IV -, Choice EF, bold full circles strike, weight 3.563 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, Nov 270 - Mar 272 A.D.; obverse IMP C AVRELIANVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust of Aurelian right, from the front, Δ below; reverse VABALATHVS V C R IM D R, laureate, diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust of Vabalathus right, from behind; SOLD


Palmyrene-Roman Empire, Aurelian and Vabalathus, c. Nov 270 - Mar 272 A.D.

|Vabalathus|, |Palmyrene-Roman| |Empire,| |Aurelian| |and| |Vabalathus,| |c.| |Nov| |270| |-| |Mar| |272| |A.D.||antoninianus|
In 272, the Emperor Aurelian crossed the Bosporus and advanced quickly through Anatolia. While the Roman general Marcus Aurelius Probus recovered Egypt. Aurelian defeated Zenobia in the Battle of Immae near Antioch. The Palmyrene armies retreated to Antioch, then later Emesa, while Aurelian advanced and took the former. The defeat at Emesa forced the Palmyrene armies to evacuate to the capital. The Romans began a siege. Zenobia, Vaballathus's mother, left the city and headed east to ask the Sasanian Empire for help. The Romans followed the queen, arrested her near the Euphrates, and brought her back to the emperor. Soon after the city fell. Vaballathus, his mother and her council were taken to Emesa and put on trial. Most of the high-ranking Palmyrene officials were executed. Vaballathus and Zenobia were sent to Rome to be displayed in Aurelian's Triumph.
RA21371. Billon antoninianus, MER-RIC 3105, BnF XII 1244, Gbl MIR 353a3, RIC V-2 381, Cohen VI 1, SRCV III 11718, gVF, weight 3.847 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 180o, 3rd officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, Nov 270 - Mar 272 A.D.; obverse IMP C AVRELIANVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, Γ below; reverse VABALATHVS V C R IM D R, laureate, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; SOLD


Palmyrene-Roman Empire, Aurelian and Vabalathus, c. Nov 270 - Mar 272 A.D.

|Vabalathus|, |Palmyrene-Roman| |Empire,| |Aurelian| |and| |Vabalathus,| |c.| |Nov| |270| |-| |Mar| |272| |A.D.||antoninianus|
Vabalathus, son of the Palmyran king Odenathus and Zenobia, was declared Augustus but Aurelian defeated his forces. He and Zenobia were then taken to Rome where they were paraded in humiliation in Aurelian's Triumph. According to some sources, they were allowed to live the rest of their lives in great comfort in Rome. The abbreviated titles of Vabalathus most likely were, Vir Clarissimus Romanorum (or Rex) Imperator Dux Romanorum. The portraits of Vabalathus are interesting because they display both the Roman laurel and the Hellenistic royal diadem.
RA85176. Billon antoninianus, MER-RIC 3107, RIC V-2 381, BnF XII 1248, Hunter IV 7, Gbl MIR 353a5, Cohen VI 1, SRCV III 11718, gVF, coppery surfaces with traces of silvering, some porosity, weight 3.262 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 315o, 5th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, Nov 270 - Mar 272 A.D.; obverse IMP C AVRELIANVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust of Aurelian right, from the front, E below; reverse VABALATHVS V C R IM D R, laureate, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Vabalathus right, from behind; SOLD


Palmyrene-Roman Empire, Aurelian and Vabalathus, c. Nov 270 - Mar 272 A.D.

|Vabalathus|, |Palmyrene-Roman| |Empire,| |Aurelian| |and| |Vabalathus,| |c.| |Nov| |270| |-| |Mar| |272| |A.D.||antoninianus|
In 272, the Emperor Aurelian crossed the Bosporus and advanced quickly through Anatolia. While the Roman general Marcus Aurelius Probus recovered Egypt. Aurelian defeated Zenobia in the Battle of Immae near Antioch. The Palmyrene armies retreated to Antioch, then later Emesa, while Aurelian advanced and took the former. The defeat at Emesa forced the Palmyrene armies to evacuate to the capital. The Romans began a siege. Zenobia, Vaballathus's mother, left the city and headed east to ask the Sasanian Empire for help. The Romans followed the queen, arrested her near the Euphrates, and brought her back to the emperor. Soon after the city fell. Vaballathus, his mother and her council were taken to Emesa and put on trial. Most of the high-ranking Palmyrene officials were executed.
RA85178. Billon antoninianus, MER-RIC 3106, BnF XII 1246, Gbl MIR 353a4, RIC V-2 381, Cohen VI 1, SRCV III 11718, Hunter IV -, Choice VF, full circles strike, nice portraits, coppery surfaces with traces of silvering, weight 3.902 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 0o, 4th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, Nov 270 - Mar 272 A.D.; obverse IMP C AVRELIANVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust of Aurelian right, from the front, Δ below; reverse VABALATHVS V C R IM D R, laureate, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Vabalathus right, from behind; SOLD







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OBVERSE LEGENDS

AVRELIANVSAVG
AVRELIANVSAVGCONS
AVRELIANVSPAVG
IMPAVRELIANVSAVG
IMPAVRELIANVSINVICTAVG
IMPAVRELIANVSINVICTVSAVG
IMPAVRELIANVSPAVG
IMPAVRELIANVSPFAVG
IMPAVRELIANVSPIVSAVG
IMPCAVRELIANVSAVG
IMPCAVRELIANVSINVICTVSAVG
IMPCAVRELIANVSINVICTVSPAVG
IMPCAVRELIANVSPAVG
IMPCAVRELIANVSPFAVG
IMPCAVRELIANVSPIVSFELAVG
IMPCDAVRELIANVSAVG
IMPCDOMAVRELIANVSAVG
IMPCLDAVRELIANVSAVG
IMPCLDAVRELIANVSPFAVG
IMPCLDOMAVRELIANVSAVG
IMPCLDOMAVRELIANVSPAVG
IMPCLDOMAVRELIANVSPFAVG
IMPCAESLDOMAVRELIANVSAVG
IMPDEOETDOMINONATOAVRELIANOAVG
SOLDOMIMPROM
SOLDOMIMPROMANI
SOLDOMINVSIMPERIROMAN


REFERENCES

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